Friday, March 18, 1881

Warren Ledger

Location: Warren, Pennsylvania

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Warren Ledger (Newspaper) - March 18, 1881, Warren, Pennsylvania LEDGER. Friday, by j. MOKIUSS Editor. WARBEN CO., PA. ia CABYZK HOBBB BLOCK._____ BUSINESS CARDS. U D. PRWSTON, M. D., HOMdOPATHIO PHYSICIAN, of Third and Liberty dmee, rcii- and jio.irt.nce, iberty 'MuchaalOftl. -m.r utirniniBtered. oppomto WM. A. QBBATKS. Portrait Painter, War- ren, Pa. Studio in second story of Hall s brick block, next to Cliuroli roi- form life, or fiom any old picture of do- Irlend painted oil. Satisfaction and flnt work waimnted in all cases. Attorney and Councilor at Lww, Block, Va. H. LJONHAUT, Dealer In Lftgoi Wine, Fancy (Jroceiics, Oigaiii, 0.0- Pipefl, Caiiuod Fiuit, ftc-.thioedoois below House, 'Wairea, Fa. novlo i7tr_ DTt B B. STBWA11T, Physician and Surgon. in the rear of jWeltine Davis' ik ug Residenco on Hickory street, nearly op- posite Union School house.___ 77-iy v OLHBY, Justice, of the Peace. Irvliioton Conveyancing, zniikJng out deotls, ana other elencal business entrusted to luui will Deceive prompt and caieful attention. 1 liOUSB.-Gontieinen vrislilng to a good Temperance Hotel will nnd Tanner House in condition. Clean win j.aniier beds and best tables of any house in town, with Kood stable accommodations. Hoard and loug ui 5 04 4 15 3 17 8 S3 3 3ft 4 63 421 4 517 5 DO 6 09 4 83 6 14 444 4 58 9 20 6 3t S28 6 48; COfr n ess G40 pm i S4 r oo 710 7 45 806 pm a. 9 10 9 21 925 9 0 50 9 68 10 10 1040 10 1057 11 00 n is il 3t It 4Ui 12 16 1321 is 12 K 1'lttsflald........ Valley..... ...East Tituavilte... i m 11 oil 11 21 11 18 11 10 10 5'i 10 r.O 10 80 10 10 S( 9 5' 1) 48 9-15 9 32 24 9 1'.' U 12 i) OU S 53 8-14 8 40 8 SIT rt pm b 55 6 '11 b 40 6 1' G p m 1210 U 01 11 57 11 3T 11 21 6 U 12 5 (58 U 00 6 SO 10 51 20 in ar> 5 20 5 1 '1 17 4 41 4 US 4 VI 69 10 10 12 10 2') 10 10 W 10 01) 0 53 9 45 MRS. LYDIA E. OF LYNN, MASS. DISCOYBKBR OF LYDIA E. PINKHAM'S VESBTABLB COMPOUND. The Positive Cure For all Female Complaints. This preparation, aa its name signifies, consists ot Vegetable properties that nro barmlebs to tho most dol- icato invalid. Upon one trial tho merits of this Com- pound -vrill be rooognizod, as relief Is Immediate j and hen Iti nso Is continued, In nlnoty-nlne cases In n, liun. died, thousands will tes- tify. On account of Its proven merits, It Is to-day re- commended and prescribed by tho best physicians in tho country. It will cmo entirely the Tvorst form of falling ot the uterus, Leucorrhosa, Irregular and painful Menstruation, all Ovarian Troubles, Inflammation and Ulceration, Flooding.., all Displacements and the con- sequent spi'.tU weakness, and is especially adapted to tho Chango of lAto. It will dissolve and expel tumors from the uteiusln an caily stage of development. The tendency toe ulcerous humors there Is checked very speedily by itii uso, In fnct it has proved to be the great- est and best lornedy that has ecer boon disoovei- od It permeate s every portion of tho system, and gives now lif o and vigor. It removes f de- stroys all craving for stimulants, and relieves weakness ot the stomach It cures Bloating, Headaches, Nervous Prostration, General Debility, Sleeplessness, Depression and Indi- gestion. That fooling of bearing down, causing pain, weight and backache, is always permanently cured by iteuse. It iviU at nil times, and under all circumstan ces, act in harmony with the law that governs the foranlesystom, For Kidney Complaints of either sex this compound is unsurpassed. Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound It prepai cd nt 233 and 235 Western Avenue, Lynn, Pi ico 01 00. Six bottles for Sent by mail in tho form of pills, also in the form of Lozenges, on receipt of puce, Sl-W, Per box, for either. Mrs. PD.TCHAM freely answers all letters of Inquiry. Send for pam- phlet Addioss as above Mention this r, No fatally should be without LYDIA E. PIKKHABt' LIVER PILLS. They cure Constipation, BUloUBnesa and Torpidity of the liver. 25 "ants per box. W SAYINGS BANK, WARRTEN, PA., Is the only chartered Savings Bank In Warren County or vicinity. Interest Allowed on Deposits. DEPOSITS MADE BY MARRIED WOMENor MINES B, KINSKY. Opposite Union School House, Warrtn, Pet. Manufacturer of nil kinde of MARBLE GRANITE MONUMENTS, TOMBSTONES, etc. I have no agents, or the so-called drummers, haunt the mourner's home, thereby giving purchasers the advantage of 15 to 20 per cent, usually paid to cover expenses of these ttoublesome talk- ing machines. My work is first- class, and satisfaction guaranteed. Warren High School fTpIIIS INSTITUTION haa for several yeius shown such JL excellence and efficiency that it may justly be called Jit piovicles tlie very best imtruction In MATHEMATICS, LITEEATUKE, AKD SCIENCE, And is provided vith excellent apparatus for illustration. Its full comse of study covera throe years, and affords fcuponot fncilitios for obtaining a liberal und practical education. If the youtig men and wemon of War- ren county and their patents will investigate tho moiito of this school, thoy will fiud theio isjno need of going abroad to got n thoiongh preparation for business 01 professional life. YOUNG TEACHERS Can find no better place to loam tho J1EST ME1HOD8 OF TEACHING, And no bottei moans than n iocominondatioa from this school to SECURE GOOD POSITIONS. L. F.WATSON, B. NE8MITH, A. J. HAZELTINE, President. Vice President. Cashier. DIRECTORS: L. F. WATSON, E. G. WOOD, O. H. HUNTER, B. NESMITH, M. B. DUNHAM, A. KIRBBRGER, JAS. CLARK. JR. WM. D. BROWJT, A. J. HAZELTINB. COAL, WOOD HMD UMBER. vs-v of unykiud, lots of Oncer, toe or eye, RIH'TIJKE, if but alight, dis- ease oflauUR or Varlame Veins give a pension. Under new law thousands are entitled to an increase of pension. luows, orphans and dependent fathers or mothers of soldiers who died in tho nrmr get a ..pension. charge for wound, injuries or rnptnre, XiVea full bounty. Sends stamps foroopy Pension and Bounty Acts. Address P. H. Fitzgerald Co.. Claim Agents. Irnhnnnpolin, Ind. -TVe refer to n, P. I'rea't Indiana Banking I Co., and R. F. Kenoetly. Pree'tC'tutral Bank.IjQth of ImUanapolifl. ,_ L ft, t SUPPINO They are slipping sweet, swift years, Like a leaf on the current caat; With never a break in their rapid flow, We watch them as one by one they go _ Into the beautiful past. As silent and swift as a weaver's thread, Or an arrow's flying gleam: As soft as the languorous bieezes hid, That lift the willow's long golden lid, And ripple the glassy stream. As light as the breath of the thistle-down; As lond as a lover's dream; As pure as the flush in the sea-shell's throat, k.s sweet as the wood-bird's wooing note, So tender and sweet they seem. One after another we see them pass, Down the dim-liglited stair; We hear the sound of their steady tread" n the steps of the centuries long since dead, As beautiful and as fair. There are only a few years left to love; Shall we waste them in idle strife? Shall we trample under our ruthless feet Those beautiful blossoms, rare and sweet, By the dusty way of life? ?here are only a fewjswift let No envious taunts be heard; Make life's fair pattern of rare design, And fill up the measure with love's sweet winet But never an angry word! [Prepared lor the .LBDBEK. SCIENTIFIC MISCELLANY. I The body of a colossal rhinoceros was' recently found in Siberia, a country most ich in gigantic fossils. Like the mam- moth washed ashore by the Lena River n 1799, it is remarkably well preserved, ,he skin-being unbroken and covered with long hair, After a cruise of a few months in the South Pacific ocean, a French man-of- war was recently found to have specimens of living coral growing upon hull, which interesting discovery has thrown some light on the question of the rapidity of giowth of corals. The evidence tends to show that the vessel on passing a reef of the G-ambier Islands, against which it rubbed, had picked up a young funqia, which adhered to the sheathing of the ship, and grew to the size and weight it had when diameter of nine nches and a weight of two and one-half nine weeks. An Australian correspondent furnishes ntereating proof of the provident and far-seeing instinct of bees. Last year the drought in JNew South Wales was of long duration, and the denizens of the apiaries suffered much from it. This year the bees lave made provision against a similar emergency by filliag a large number of the external cells in every hiye with, pure water instead of honey. It is believed ;hat the instinct of the insects leads them to anticipate a hot summer and to pro- vide against it. By means of newly-improved pumps, it is possiblejto secure a vacuum so nearly perfect that a given spacp will contain not more than the (-millionth of its normal quantity of air. The Journal de edited by M. d'Almeida, rates this During the investment'-and ,'siege of Paris by the German armies in 1870-71 M. d'Almeida took a prominent part in certain attempts to re-establish telegraphic communica- tion between Paris and the provinces, using the river Seine as a conductor. This suggestion originated with M. Bour- bonze (of galvanometer who was, after the war, created a chevalier for his suggestion. It was proposed to send powerful currents into the river Seine from batteries at the nearest available point outside the German lines, and to receive in delicate galvanometers, from the river such a portion of these currents as might not have leaked into the earth. After some preliminary ex- periments, it was decided to make the attempt, and accordingly on Dee. 17, 1870, d'Almeida was despatched by balloon in order to try to establish this novel mode of wires, The balloon descended after sundry perils in the Arcadian solitudes of Cham- pagne outside the Prussian lines. Thence he proceeded to Bavre, where he was compelled to wait for the arrival of appar- atus from England. The instruments were conveyed to Poissy, where M. d'Al- meida arrived on Jan, Ice in the river now interfered, and ere the attempt at made the armistice was proclaimed. It was too late; and the world missed a famous sci- entific exploit from among those which made the siege of Paris notable beyond all other sieges of history. A late novel application of electricity is the construction of a soldering iron in which a piece of platinum is heated by the electric current, and employed to fuse any kind of solder. A new use for photography in connec- tion with the higher arts has been found in the discovery that it may be relied upon to detect any restoration or tamper- ing with old paintings. On recently ex- amining the first proof of a well-known Madonna, in the British National Gal- lery, photographer observed a disfiguring blur over tha forehead. No such blur was discernible in the original, except upon close inspection with the aid of a magnifying glass. The microscopic ex- amination showed that the restorer had repaired some casual damage with a skill that reproduced the color and the texture of the painter; but he had not used the same pigments, and this was instantly detected by the subtle chemistry of light. Eecent investigations have shown the depth of the ocean between latitudes sixty degrees north and sixty degrees south to be nearly three miies, or fathoms. The greatest depth which has been ascertained by sounding is five miles and a quarter, or fathoms, and oc- curs in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. This represents a thickness of the watei layer nearly equal to the' height of the loftiest known mountain. The effect of alloying certain metals with certain other, metals is quite re markable. The presence of one-twen tieth of one per cent of lead in standard gold will render a bar an inch thick so brittle that it may readily be broken by a slight rap with a hammer. Several electric railways will be exhibi ted at the forthcoming exhibition of elec trie apparatus at Paris, and will doubt less attract much attention from scien tificmen. "BUSINESS PRINCIPLES" When you want .something to attend strictly to business and cure a cough or qold in the head, get Dr. Fenner's lin proved Cough It will relieve an] case in one hour. Try a sample bottle at a, -feblfiyl AK AMERICAN FACT. BY IDA DINSMOOR. "Their taunts and jeers I can no longer bear to hear. Yes, to-night I will leave this place where sneers are heaped upon me. I must tear myself away, no one cares for me, and why should they? poor and penniless, and they say they do not enow even my origin. Oh, howjiard it s to be cast upon the world thus, friend- ess and poor." And as he spoke, he buried hia face in hia hands, as if he would suppress his gushing feelings, and near to him .stood one that witnessed his distress. said a syren voice close be- lind him, "is there no one who cares for you, Percy V" and on his shoulder she intlly laid her snowy hand, as though she would suppress his unbelief. He started, turned around, and there stood Bose, and her sweet face wore a look of pain. "A <tyoke heaaid, "yes, yes, sweet still-----" "I do, Percy, and father----" "Yes, your father is my friend." "Then why will you leave us, said Bose in a tender tone. "Bose, you know that I have been the jause of much discord since 1 have been n your family, and I have borne the reatment I have, for the respect I lad for your father, and my love for you; but I can bear it no longer, I will go out nto the world in hopes that I may yet acquire a fortune j and Bose, tell me, if I do, and cotue ag ;in may I hope-----" Ob, I will love you said she, nterrupting him, "and though years hould pass away before you return, I will remain faithful." be, and then he im- pressed a kiss upon her sweet, rosy lips, md away. Another hour and he had quit the house where be had pent so many years. It was near the closing of a mild, sum- mer day, when a magnificent steamer ay anchored at the Oresent City, its decks were crowded with strangers, all eager to tread onee more upon the land. Among the last that stepped on shore, was a tall young man from the North. With his valise in Us band, he bent his way along the wharves in search of em- ployment among the shipping houses ;hat stood there; but alas I be was a stranger and had failed to bring creden- tials to recommend himself, as he should have done; he searched in vain, until at last with faltering atep and a heavy heart ae was giving up in despair, when he came to a large ware-house, where he had not been before; he walked into the counting-room, where a man of perhaps forty years of age was sitting, Percy thought perhaps he might be the leader of the establishment. Percy enquired if he was the head, bis answer was, young man, what do of With a full heart Percy spoke, "Do you want a boy in your store to do such work as lean do? I have no reccommend to offer yon. I have just arrived in a steamboat from the North, have no money or friends, have not even change to pay for a nights lodging." The mer- chant looked incredulous. Percy saw it and his heart sank with fears; "Oh, do not refuse he said, while tears trickled down his cheek. The merchant, at first half doubting, was moved by his grief, and being pleased by his frankness, told ijim he would try him a few days. Our young friend walked home with the merchant; and a few days it proved as he told. The merchant was so much pleased with the strange .youth that he engaged turn to assist him in his trade. In course of time he became the head- clerk, he never seemed to weary of any task that would please his employer, and in the family of the merchant he was a great favorite. They all loved him, and tie in return loved them as ardently as an own son. But Percy, although he thought that Nellie Thornton was as fair as his Bose, still he only loved her as a sister. Five years'had passed and be had now become one of the owners of the store where five years before he had begged a home; poor, moneyless and without friends. One evening as they were conversing in the family, as Percy was socially talking, Mrs. Thornton eyed him very sharply and said, "Percy looks like Nellie very said her husband, "if they were brother and sister they would not look more alike; our own little boy, our Percy we lost, could not resemble her more." Had you a son by that said Percy, "when did he die." "I would to God that he was said Mrs. Thornton, with a sigh; "I should fee! much more happy if I thought him dead, tor now if he is alive he may be among strangers, whose hearts seldom give the love and sympathy of apparent'' "He was lost said Percy. said Mr.Thornton; '-seventeen years ago my wife and I went to the North, on a visit to New York. We had only one child at that time, our little son. We arrived there in safety, and after we had staid some time with our friends we prepared to return. All in readiness, we took our way to Philadelphia, where we hastened on board a steamer that lay there all ready for sea. I went to see ii our baggage was secure; my wife and child I thought were safe in the cabin. Marjc my surprise, when I went down, to find my wife, but my boy was gone; she thought he was with me. We searched the vessel, but no boy was found. My wife fell in a swoon. Ah, how awful were my thoughts, that each moment increased the distance between us and our darling child; and another thought would come rushing into my mind, that our boy had fallen overboard and was drowned, resolved as soon as we reached New Orleans to leave my wife with her friends and hasten back to find my boy. But underwent so much that I was seized with a fever and spent months on the road; when I recovered aud arrived in Philadelphia, I could find no trace of m; child, and never since have we hear bat her daughter could wed the son of the richest merchant in New Orleans. Without resounded music; joy and gladness reigned witbin tbe elegant mansion, for it was the birtb-nigho of sweet Bose. Tbe youtb and beauty of the metropolis had been asked, and as Bose mingled in tbe giddy whirling of the dance, a lovely smile might be seen on her sweet face, but as soon as the excitement passed by a sorrowful expression would steal into the lately laughing eye; and those tbat saw it knew that something was wanting to make her happiness com ete. Perhaps it was Percy, who was wandering afar from the mansion seat of Mr. Le Claire; perhaps she was thinking .bat be who had won ber maiden heart was diagging bis life away in poverty. Yes, it was of tbat friendless youth she was thinking; such is woman's con- tancy; alasl that it should be abused. Then, was it strange that she should ook so sad? The evening was advanced, when Mr. Le Claire came to Bose, linked arm in arm with one who, it appeared, md chanced to call upon him. His countenance was dark, bis hair like the wing, and his tall, straight form and black eye showed clear that he was born beneath a southern sun. Thornton, of New said Mr. Le Claire, and, after talking a moment, he walked to the opposite side of the saloon, where Mrs. Le Claire was sitting. "Who is that tall young man you have iust introduced to said she, seem- ingly lost in admiration. "Why, that is Mr. Thornton, dear, of New Orleans, the richest merchant that lives there." After a short conversation with Bose, his heart as full as it cduld be, he led her on to the floor to dance the last dance of the evening. It is strange that a few years will ihange one so much, not only the form, but the face. Tbe morning after the party, Mr. Le Zaire's family were seated in the parlor, Bose leaning her head on her hand as though in deep thought, when a servant entered and gave a letter to Mr. Le Claire; he opened and looked at it a mo- ment, then approaching Bose be said: 'Cbeeriup Bose, Percy has come, he will be here in twenty minutes; come, come, :heer up he is welcome Then he began pacing the floor. _ said he, as a fine carriage drove to tbe door, with servants and liv- ery. A gentleman sprang lightly out. s is Mr. Thornton, and I will intro- duce him to Percy, who will soon be here." "I don't see why you should be so glad to introduce a poor youth like Percy so Mr. Thornton of the South. But per- haps, he may be as rich as Mr. Thornton now, for when be went away be said he bad hopes of gaining a she said sarcasticly. he bas been most fortunate, exclaimed Percy, who entered that moment. "Thanks to kind Provi- dence for directing me to my father's house some years ago. 'Tis Percy himself who stands before you. Bose screamed with delight, and flew to his arms, too much overcome to speak. The old man was affected so much tbat he stood silent, with trembling lip, and wept like a child. Oh, how deep was that moment of bliss; it made amends for all the years of absence, years of doubt and distress tbat both bad passed. It was not long before lights again gleamed from the mansion of Mr. Le Claire, and again there gathered a gay crowd to witness the marriage of Bose to tbe man who had borne so much for her sake, and her proud and haughty mother was pleased with the union of her daugh- ter with a poor outcast. Itching Plica Is one of the most annoying diseases in tbe world, and yet all can find sure relief by the use of Dr. Swayne's Ointment. It bas been tested in thousands of instances and invaria- bly makes a sure cure. The symp- toms are moisture, like perspiration, intense itching, increased by scratch- ing, very distressing, particularly at night, as if pin-worms were crawling in and about tbe recUm; the private parts are sometimes affected. Reader, if you are suffering from this distr ss- ing complaint, tetter, itch, scald head, ringworm, barber's itch, any crusty, scaly, skin eruptions, use Swayne's Ointment and be cured. Sold by all prominent druggists. Alfred Meyers, of Lower Mt. Bethel, is tbe owner of a strange looking calf, born about ten days ago. Instead of having eves, where these invaluable organs usually exist in animals of its class, there are two narrow slits, and where tbe tail should be there is none, but the "narrative" appears midway be- tween the hip and where it properly be- longs. At its birtb this strange creature balanced a hundred and four pounds, and it promises to reach the common days of its species. Mr. Meyers remains unde- termined what to do with tbis singular beast. A Daughter Reacued. A Franfcfort (Ky.) physician writes: Some months ago tbe daughter of one of our prominent citizens was pronounced a hopeless consumptive. She was very much reduced in flesh, terriblecougb, her life gradually wasting away. I recom- mended ber to use "Dr. Swayne's Com- pound Syrup of Wild which she did. In a short time she was free from all cougb and other symptoms; and is now rosy and healthy. Price 26 cents and a bottle, or 6 bottles The large size is tbe most economical. Prepared only by Dr. Swayne Son, Philadelphia. Sold by druggists. An occasional dose of "Swayne'a Pills" should betaken to keep tbe bowels free. Tbey are excellent for torpid liver and bilious complaints. dl0y current article is en till! i "Shrink- age in Hogs." It can't refer to tbe breed that occupies two seats apiece a rail- road ear. They don'fc shrink. They ex and, spread oat. diffuse themselves, so ,1 T i it' AN OLD-TIME EASTON SENSATION. Who Can Tell What the Strange flappings Meant J Twenty-five years ago Depue S., and Thomas T. Miller kept a dry goods, gro- cery and general store at what was known as "Burke's old now the parlor ot the residence of Mr. John T. Knight, on North Fourth stieet, nearly opposite Barnet's hotel. Among the men in their employ was Fred Heller, a young man of steady habits and fiue appearance, who came to Eastern to Monroe county. Depue S. Miller, a brother of our townsman Thomas T., took considerable interest in religious matters and delighted to dis- cuss doctrinal points. He was very lib- eral in his views and did not have a great deal of, iaith in the orthodox theory of an unending torment lor the wicked. Young Heller did dot agree with Mr. Miller and they often discussed their differences of opinion. One day, after a debate upon the truth or fallacy of endless punish- ment, one of them proposed that he who died first should return and by certain raps inform the other which doctrine was the correct one. The proposition was at once accepted. Another person, a Oer- man named Barthol, also in the employ ot Miller Bro., was called to witness the agreement. Mr. Thomas T. Miller happened to be in the store at the time and also heard what was said. When the bargain was made both men were in good health, with every prospect of many moie days. During the following winter Mr. Heller went lo a sleighing party at which he took a severe cold, that rapidly devel- oped into consumption. Unable to follow bis occupation the young man went to his home in Monroe county. And heie the first strange occurrence happened. One day he retained to the house looking very pale and nightened, and when he was asked by his iiiends what ailed him replied that as he was picking shellbarks he had been' taken up by some unseen power, carried some distance and again set on earth. As he grew worse Mr. Hel- ler, who while in Easton boarded in Mr. Depue S. Miller's iamily, became anxious to return to town. Despite the remon- stances ot his friends be came to Easton, and two days after his arrival died very unexpectedly at the residence of Mr. Miller, the house now occupied by Kev. CJ. H. Edgar, on the corner of North Fourth hnd Spring Garden street. Boon after Mr. Heller's death strange noises were heard in and about the house. The noise always consisted of three distinct raps or blows. .At one time three loud raps weie heard in the hall, but on going out no one was to be seen, while the raps weie repeated on the partition. Keys on the piano were sounded, always three in rapid succession. On the day that the corpse of young Heller out of the house, raps were heard by the pall bearers in the en try. These occurrences became so fie- quent, and desiring that the matter should not be given publicity, Mr. Miller sent bis family away. But be continued to sleep in the building, accompanied by the man Barthol, had been the wit- ness to the agreement made with Heller. One night while the two lay in bed, they heard three loud raps on the wall of their toom. In a few minutes after a hand seemed to grasp their cover, ana in three jerks pulled it from them to the floor. Mr. Barthol was about to speak to the invisible visitor, when Mr. Miller whis- pered to him to keep quiet, adding, "Don't you rememoer my baruain with Ferd From that hour the noises ceased, and although watch was kept for several succeeding nights, noth- ing bappputid wot thy of mention. Of couise it is impossible for the writer to say what power made" the noise heard by the inmates of Mr. Miller's house, or pulled the covers from the bed. He leaves it to each reader to judge whether the opinion of some that it was the spirit of Ferd Heller, returned to inform Mr. Mil- ler in accordance with their agreement is correct or not. That the agreement was made is beyond doubt. Triat strange noises or disturbances followed the death of Mr, Heller can be proven by living witnesses. Mr. Miller never volunteered to talk about the matter, although when questioned he always told tl.e same story, aid as he was a man of the highest in- tegrity, no one presumed to question, what he said. Mr, Miller afterwards moved to Stroudsburg and then to Kan- sas, where he died a few years ago, became of the man Barthol we cannot say. Mr. Thomas T. Miller, a brother of Depue S., is the enterprising wholesale dealer in hardware, on North Fourth street, and he doutless recollects the mat- ter ot which this article relates. A Long Absent Husband Turns up at Last. WOONSOCKET, E. L, Feb. socket has a sensation in the unexpected return of a long-lost husband and father after a prolonged and unexplained ab- sence. It seems that twenty seven years ago Albert Fame was a young stone mason in Woonsocket. lie had a wife and one child, a son. Paine was the owner of a tract of land, which he leased for the sum of to William Andrews. Almost immediately after leasing the land he (Paine) mysteriously disappeared and all efforts to learn of his whereabouts or whether he was m the "land of living" were unavailing. His wife, after a season of inquiry aud a period of lament- ing and mourning, began to consider her husband as dead. Seven years passed away, and the alleged widow became a supposed bride, manying A. B. Cole, of the town of Woonsocket. For twenty years Mrs. Paine lived as the wife of Cole, and no suspicion over crossed her mind that she was not his "lawfully wedded." The sou, A.VB Prine, had in the meantime grown commenced suit against William A. Andrews for the property leased by his father before he disappeared. This si it is still pending in the court. A few days ago the Paine-Cole family was astounded by the sudden re-appear- ance of Albert Paine. He returned after an absence, aa stated above, of twenty- seven years to find his wife married to another, his son grown up and himself regarded as dead. He was as one who came ftona the grave to learn that the world had moved during his long sleep, and those be had most dear had formed other ties and relations. Paine has been all these twenty-seven years in New Hampshire engaged in farming. He has accumulated a considerable property. He will return to New Hampshire at once. What the double-wedded wife is not known. Paine, ic is said, says that he will not live with her again. "Swayne's Ointment and Pills The Greatest Remedies the World has ever Known, Curing the most inveterate case of skin diseases, such as tetter, salt rheum, scald head, barber's itch, sores, all crusty, scaly skin eruptions, and that distressing com- plaint, itching piles. Aa a blood purifier and liver regulator, Swayne's Tar and Sarsapadlla Pills are excellent, Cure sick and nervous headache, dyspepsia, indigestion; ward off malarial fevers, cleansing the system and bowels of all impurities, restoring to healthy activity every organ of the body. Price 25 cents a box; five boxes Ointment, 60 cents; three boxes Can be sent by mail to any address on receipt of price. Ad- dress letters, Dr. Swayne Son, 330 North Sixth Street, Philadelphia. Sold by druggists. decl9yl A Fatherlets Cowtry. A man recently received a woodcut pic- ture of George Washington, and pinned it to the wall near his office door. day while at his work his little girls came into his room, and, espying the picture, started the following dialogue: "Who is that a picture of, "Washington." Who was "Father of this country." "Why was he called father of his try, "Because be fought for its independence and was a great and good num." "Is he alive now, papaV" "No." "When did be "December 14th, 1799." "Who is father of this country now. "No one; it's fatherless." The little girl was silent a few moments, and then enquired: "Was he the little boy that couldn't tell a "The same." "Well, this country will never bave another father, will it, And the conversation was concluded with the emphatic "Neverl not even a stepfather." York housekeepers are just now stirred up by the discovery that the One foreign servants have brought over with them something besides docility and capacity. It is the universal practice in the larger cities of Europe for the servants to extort com missions from alt sorts of shop-people with whom thev are sent to deal by their masters. In Paris this is the most fertile source of fleecing practiced upon strangers who take bouses. Commissions are collected by the con- cierge (doorkeeper) by the cook, by the butler and often by the housemaid. Sometimes the whole body of domestics are batided together and share the spoil pro rata, sometimes each exacts on individual account. Thus every article consumed in the household pays a tax, from the coal merchant to the milkman. It a book be kept and the mistress of the. house seeks to regulate her affairs, a double entry is made, onatbr the mistress and one for the butler. If the shopkeeper have any scruples, which he never does, the domestics so manage as to get hia warea into disrepute. The business has readied such ptoportioas in JSew York that the newspapers have taken it up and the revelations fairly equal the worst phases of the tratlic in Paris or London. Butchers report ttut servants exact from 25 to a month and that if this black mail is refused the meat is so cooked that the housekeeper declines to trade any more with the shop. So on through the whole list, the tax being openly and per- sistently demanded. When this is not done large dealers are in the habit of making the cook a present during the holidays. wooden Indian ought properly to be the sign not of a tobacco shop, but of loan office. It would indicate to the pawner that within be would find the Pawnee. following receipt for eloquence is given by a "Down-East" orator: "Get yourself chock full of the subject, knock a You ngswille correspondent of the Tituaville Herald we take this bit of feminine independence: "Quite a revival meeting has been in progiass lately on Yoi k Hill, two miles from this place. It is carried on by the Weslcyan Methodists, It is well known that this denomination ignore secret societies, and never let an opportunity pass without giving useless blows at the head of the hated mouster. One evening during the revival, a preach- er from Uattaraugus county, N. Y., pitched into secret, societies in his usual vigorous manner. A leading lady mem- ber of the York Hill Wesleyan Church, who belongs to the YoungsvilleEquitable Aid Union, sat and listened, aim at the close of the reverend gentleman's tirade, jumped to her feet, and, clapping her hands m a happy and independent man- ner, said, in a voice verging on what you might call loudness, "I listen to such talk and let it fall hai unless to the ground. It don't hurt me. Thank Godl I've got a policy on earth, and one in Heaven, and I'm going to keep both of them Things soon settled down, and the meet- ing went on. But there is less secret society talk than before this little out- burst." An Elegant Toilet Preparation, Hair dressing and restorative is found in "London Hair Color Bestorer." It sel- dom fails to restore gray or faded hair to its original youthful color beauty. Fall- ing hair is checked by its use, and it pro- duces a growth of beautiful young hair, soft, glossy and luxuriant. It certainly is the most cleanly and effective hair restorer now before the American peo- ple. A. A. Gibson, Barrytown, Duchess caunty, N. if., writes: Dr. Swayne Sou Philadelphia: enclose a post- oflicH order for eight dollars; please send me one dozen "London Hair Color Be- storer." It has stopped my hair from falling, and restored it to its natural color. It has proven satisfactory in every respect. Tlie "London Hair Color Re- storer" can be obtained at all the leading druggists at 75 cents a bottle. way they start a railway train in Germany is thus described: When all is rea-iy, a bell rings. Then another bell rings. Then the engine whistles, or rather, she toot-toot-toots generally. Then the conductor tells the station-mas- ter that all is ready. Then the station- master looks placidly around and says Then the conductor shouts "Fer- interrogatively. Then the station- master shouts "Fertigl" positively. Then the conductor blows a bom; the engine whistles; the bell rings; the other bell rings; the station master says the passengers swear, in various tongues; and the train starts. That is, unless a belated fat man comes. Then they do it all over again. have been a sufferer for years with Catarrh and under a pbysieian'a treatment for over a year, have tried a numfooi ol "sure cure" reme- dies and obtained no I was advised to try Ely's Cream Balm. It gave me immediate relief. I believe I am now entirely cuicd. G. S. DAVIS, First National Bank, Elizabeth, N. J., August By far the best remedy for the treatment of catarihand its kindred, diseases is Ely's Cream Balm, which is having the largest sales withjus Of any preparation now ottered. The reports arc all favorable, and we do not hesitate tofln- dorse it as superior to any and all other articles in the market. The Balm is pleasant anil easy to use. CYRUS LAWAM. Sow, Druggists, Eauton, Pa. inli-U superiority of the masculine over the femeniue gender is apparent in all the concerns of life, aud yet we have found no such irrefutable statement of the fact as that made by a thoughtful Teuton. He said: "If the women look at the moon, they always see a ma in it; if they hear a mouse nibbling after dark, it's a man trying to break into the house; and they always look under the bed, the last thing at night, to find a man. Now, a man never looks under the bed to find a woman, does Irish laborer in a coal-yard struck for higher wages, and got discharged. said he, "I've learned something from the boss, while I worked for him, that I didn't know before, and that is that a ton is pounds." was a four-year-older who ashed: "Papa, have you done anjtlung down town to-day that you think I ought to whip you for, if I were as big as 700 tailor was startled the other day by the return of a bill which be had Mitt to an editor, with a notice that the script was respectfully declined." is a fact worth remembering jn the Washington holiday seMoa that ashes made by burning the of a cherry tree will never produce lye; a discussion with a temperance lecturer, a toper, asked: "If water rota your boots, what effect must it bave on the coats of your stomachV" is painful rumor afloat that the ice crop has been touched by the frost, and that high prices may, consequently, be expected next summer. corn-dodger: a man who avoids wearing tight BAD. The agony of neuralgia, toothache, headache, or any pain whatsoever can be relieved instantaneously by using Dr. Fenner's Goldeu Belief. Itateoreadllf cured rheumatism, kidney dis- ease, colic, diarrbcBo, dysintery bur Try ft out the ,and tot:

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