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Warren Evening Mirror Newspaper Archive: June 30, 1917 - Page 1

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Publication: Warren Evening Mirror

Location: Warren, Pennsylvania

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   Warren Evening Mirror (Newspaper) - June 30, 1917, Warren, Pennsylvania                               THIRTY-FIFTH YEAR. JUNE 1917. PRICE TWO CENTS. Heavy Blows Have Been Delivered But at an Awful Cost to tie Flower of the German Army BRITISH HAVE ADVANCED FOUR MILES DURING RECENT OPERATIONS Lens Must Soon Be Evacuated by Re- sume Offensive in Eastern Assumes Her-Share in Patroling South Atlantic and Providing Shipping ASSOCIATED PARISr June Germans Resumed -a attack on the Verdun front west of Dead Man Hill last night. Picked German troops advanced one to three quarters on 'a mile front and were almost annihilated by the French. The Germans penetrated the first line trench but were driven out excepting on the western slope of Dead Man Hill. '.Grown- Prmcerfoiled-'a -year- ago' in'his prolonged- attempt take is again delivering blows of magnitude on its and has made some impressions on the French line. assaults are anything more than demonstrations on a large it is difficult to make out from the official reports. Dead Man Hill and Hill 304 were scenes of'the heaviest Ger- attacks. Both commanding eminences are protected by a strong fortress. In neither Thursday's or yesterday's which the French reports were anything more than first line-trenches penetrated and General Petain's forces last night got back most of the ground lost the day before on Hill the Dead Man Hill sector the Germans carried a line on the entire but the French reaction drove them out except on the western slope of the hill. On the British front the Germans still are on back Gen- eral Haig's latest operations carrying the British line well south of the coal city of Lens. Hi's flanking movement makes the German tenure of 'the city itself more precarious daily. to Co-operate June navy has begun co-operating with the American fleet in South American waters in hunting down German sea raiders and watching for submarines. The sending of a special diplomatic mission to Brazil to arrange for a greater coordination of sea forces is new under consideration here. Mas Joined United States Without a formal declaration of war Brazil has joined the forces of the United States in its action against Germany. Concurrant with the announcement of naval operations comes a plan' for .the shipping of frozen meats and other food stuffs .to the allies go- ing into effect. Whether or not Brazil will make a formal declaration of war against 'Germany is not known as the govern- ment at Rio de Janeiro is inclined to regard her acts more as defensive than offensive. _ For the present Brazil's part is to do all she can to safeguard the south- ern seas and move with all rapidity to Europe supplies of foodstuffs. Her navy is the largest of the South American group and its co-operation with the South Atlantic Fleet com- manded by Admiral Caperton and H is believed that the work of keeping the South Atlantic clear for shipping will be greatly facilitated. It is not the purpose of Brazil to patrol the coasts off Argentine and hopes is still held by the state de- on Page TRY TO COLLECT BIG TRANSFER TAX WHOLE FAMILY BUB3TED TO BEATH EST HOME June B. aged his aged and their six ranging in age from one to 13 years of were burned death today in a fire that destroyed their home at near this place. HUMILITY WITH LASH Lloyd George Says Prussians Are Now Receiving Much Needed Lesson Says If Necessary Govern- ment Will Aid People of England to Buy Bread Associated June have got the German army under- said David Lloyd-George to- day in a speech delivered here. a great army is driven to dig themselves it means that we are pounding a sense of their gTeat in- feriority into the pores of the German military mind. This is good for the but it is even better for after the for as long as the Prussians have an idea that they are supreme in any sense of the will not be a place for decent people to make their home. Prussian nation has never ex- perienced aay sense of humility arid this sense of humility is now being taught to the Prussian leaders and by the .flerce and relentless Lloyd-George also said that if neces- sary the government would go to the exchequer in order that the price of bread might be kept within reach of all of the people of the United King- dom. MORE MEN ARE CITED FOR TRIAL Associated NE June In- vestigation of the methods employed by the police department of New York in unraveling the mystery surround- ing the murder of Ruth the 18-year-old high school girl murdered last February by Alfredo was not in progress it nounced many new angles would be presented when the investigation is resumed July 6th. With the cases five members of the police department already referred the investigation and trial at po- lice headquarters by Commissioner who is conducting the in- it is said that two others of the department are to be cited for trial. COMPANY I DRILLED ON AND ATTRACTED MUCH ATTENTION Several Enlistments Made Last Night and Some Fine Young Men Were Added to Roster Associated June state will fight to enforce the transfer tax of on the estate of the late Hetty Green. It will be if to the United States supreme court. The tax will amount to The comptroller today announced that the decision of the surrogate With more interest shown than has been apparent for many weeks past the regular weekly drill of Company I was held Friday evening. There were about fifty members of the com- pany out in uniform and Captain Tribble took the'men out on the street and gave them a fine evening's drill. During the drill the men were taken out on Pennsylvania avenue and they attracted much attention. The major portion of the men who turned out to drill were recruits and their progress in the drill regulations may well be a matter of pride to them. The company is winning some fine lecruits during the past few sturdy specimens of young American manhood who will reflect credit on flag and their country. Three new names were added to the roster Friday evenin-g Bryan Werner Malhyer and Arthur J. Van- i Sile. All passed the physical cxamm- j ation and were sworn into the ser- vice. During the week Theron who was formerly a member of the and who was on the reserve list came back into the service. A complete roster of Company I up to date appears today under the roll of honor for Warren county. If any names have been overlooked it is to be hoped that Ihe boys notify the equipment that they will need in ser- vice. The addition of many recruits to the company has drained the quarter- masters supply of clothing and men who enlist now are having their which held that the estate was Mirror. not taxable because .Airs. Green vas a Second Lieut. Harry Whcelock was resident of Bellows Falls. Vt. not present at the drill as he is out of The decision of the supreme court'1 tic city. Lieut. Wheelock has sent for will form the basis for legislation to J his equipment tbat'is required for his rover the imposition of taxes on prop- office and it is expected to arrive in erty of non-residents who are now re- a few days. Major Bordwell and Ma- siding in the state. jor Wheelock have also sent for the measurements taken and the company is making requisitions for the need- ed supplies. When the company leaves Warren it is planned to have each man in as fine shape as possible as regards etc. Charles of Tidioiite attend- ed drill Friday evening. Charlie was recently promoted to corporal and he is making good. He has secured a number of recruits at Tidioute and they are drilling regularly. He re- por.ts he has some more likely young men interested in the company and that he expects to be able to enlist them' soon. Just when the guard will be called into service is problematical although the original announcement that July find the New York and Pennsylvania guardsmen in service has not been changed. That date has been tentatively selected.and will undoubtedly stand. Two weeks will be spent in the armory according to the plans and then the men will go to the mobilization camps. From there the step into the training camps in France is expected to be very short as the announcement that the guard camps will be of canvas leads to the belief that the men. will go aboard transports in the very near future and that their period of training will be General Pershing Gives Out First Statement Regard- ing American Forces NO SERIOUS ILLNESS REPORTED Wonderful Scenes Marked Landing of American Regulars Associated June a man was lost.in transit and there was not even a case of serious said Gen- eral Pershing today on his return to headquarters here after- a quick trip to the port of debarkation of the American troops now in France. landing of the first American contingent of the army was highly successful. In the largest trans- port of a large of troops in fact the biggest we have ever under- taken there was a single man or ani- mal lost or injured. There- was not even any sickness except a few cases of men who landed were all In splendid condition and their morale was excellent. All were spirited and full of life and looked ready for any- thing they might physical appearance was ex- cellent and with their red cheeks and in the glow of health all were young fellows and they will compare in appearance with any troops en- gaged in the activities on the western Americans are being-cared for exceptionally well in camps of wooden with good beds and good placed on high ground. For all ot these things we are greatly indebted tol French officer's so ably and willingly co-operated with my of- ficers and men in preparing for the coming of Scenes of Joy AT A FRENCH June by first .contingent of American troops landed today and they were given wel- come. The transports whose arrival had not been announced publicly-came steaming in in a long line into the har- bor. News of their arrival spread rapidly and by the time the ships were drawn up to the docks thousands had gathered on the quays to give them greeting. A wild welcome was given the Americans by the shipping in the harbor and the whistles of the many tugs and boats screeched forth. Cries of la and la Estates seemed to pour from every throat. Dotted in the crowd among the women and children and the old men were the bright uni- forms of the soldiers and naval men who had been drawn to the scene. As the transports drew up .to the docks the Stars and Stripes broke out from on Page EXCESS PROFIT TAX SETTLED on Page Associated June inform- ation reached here today that Dr. Maurice the American minis- ter to DenmarR at has delivered a protest to the Danish gov- ernment regarding anti-American ut- terances of M. the Socialist member of the Danish cabinet at the recent Socialist convention in Stock- holm. M. Strauuing is a minister without j a portfolio in the Danish cabinet and I was a most prominent figure at the re- cent Socialist convention at Stock- holm. Little reference to his remarks concerning the United States have reached but the of quotes him as j United States is vainly publishing its j peace aims in its when it is a war of capital and the entry of the United States is retarding rather than bringing peace ONLY STATES HAVE Recruiting Week Has Failed to Give Army as Many Men As Needed Western States Have Given More Men Than Were Allotted to Them Associated June Wilson's call for volunteers to bring up the strength of the army to the needed number of men has not been realised. The war department announced today that the army was still short The discrepancy in numbers will be relieved by reserves from the new conscriptive army. With recruiting week at an end only nine states have furnished their quota of men. Nevada to fill its having furnished with a quota of Idaho gave 737 with a quota of Illinois with a quota of Indiana gave with a quota of Michigan gave with a quota of Montana gave with a quota of Ore- son gave with a quota of Utah gave with a quota of and Wyoming gave with a quota of 290. MURDERER HAS CHOSEN TO BE SHOT Associated SALT LAKE June 30 Howard De sentenced to death for the slaying of his wife last Septem- has chosen to be shot rather than hanged at the law's July 6th. He is resigned to his fate and says he hopes that no steps will be taken to gain a new trial or a reprieve. 'The laws of Utah provide that a person sentenced to death may choose the way to die. Before deciding upon being De Weese asked the prison guard questions relative to the calibrei of the stating that he did not want the marksmen to with but to make dealh instantaneous. DC Weese eloped with the of Harry W. from New York. Tfiey went to Reno and Pacific coast cities to live. Last Sep- tember the who had married at Reno after Mrs. Fisher obtained a came to Salt Lake City. A few days later neighbors became suspicious and the apartment was en- tered. They discovered the body of Mrs. De her features smashed by a flatiron which lay on the bed be- side her. A few months later De Weeso sur- rendered to the Chicago police. In the interval between his surrender and trial he confessed to numerous burg- laries and boasted that he was the greatest diamond thief of the last de- cade. He asserted that his wife was slain by robbers with whom ho for- merly who had tracked him and his wife to Salt Lake Cjty he was committed the murder to obtain worth of jewels DC Weese said he had stolen. THRJUTJHX TO TIE IT SHIFTIMJ WITH STItIKE Associated NEW June en- gineers and crews of the tug boats in the harbor here are demanding a raise in wages and threaten to strike on -Monday and tie up all shipping if their demands aie refused. The cap- lains and engineers arc demanding a raise of pel1 month and the deck- hands and cooks arc asking for a raise of per month. ANOTHER imUADNAUCJHT WAS TODAY Associated N. June suer- drcadnaught Idaho was successfully launched today. Henrietta Aurelia granddaughter of Governor of was the sponsor. The general public was not admitted because of war conditions. In speed the Idaho dupli- cates Pennsylvania and Missis- sippi. Massachusetts State Board of Labor and Industries has ruled that women coiemakcrs may not lift more than 25 Three Stirring Speeches on Patriotism to be Delivered by Clergymen Civil War Company I and Other Military Organi- zations to be Honor Guests In response to a is- sued by Gov. calling upon all the churches of the state to unite in patriotic Warren will hold two big mass i'or men in Library theatre and one for wo- men in the First Presbyterian church. The meeting i'or men will begin promptly at o'clock and the Rev. W. H. pastor of Trinity Memo- rial Episcopal church will preside. Tho music will be -under the super- vision of Prof. J- -assisted by singers from the various churches. The A. F. of M. band will bo present and act as escort for Company and the marching men and assist in the service m the theatre. The program is as Prelude. Invocation. Hymn. Scripture N. J. Wes- sell. E. W. Robinson. Oiferatoiy. Hymn. The subjects will be of Our ratriotism ot Our of W. E. Rev. N. A. Rev. J. W. Smith. Hymn. Benediction. Eben N. Ford G. A. has ac- cepted an invitation to attend in a body and the members of the Post will meet at their hall at 7 o'clock and march to the theatre in a body where They will have seats of honor with others on the stage. During the ser- vice an offering will be received for the Red Cross. Every roan and boy in Warren is urged to attend this ser- vice. GLASS BOTTLE PLANT BURNED Fire breaking out this morning shortly before 5 o'clock in the plant of the Sheffield Glass Botlie of damaged the plant to the extent of resulted in damage to the machines and will cause the shut down of the plant until Septem- ber 1st. The alarm was sounded by engines on the P. R. whose engi- neers noted the and this was followed by a general alarm being sounded. The department was soon on the job and held the fire in check until the engine of the Elk Tanning company when under heavy water pressure the flames were beaten down. The fire was burning when discov- ered on the clapboards in front of the tanks in the main building and this Structure was practically the cause of the fire is unknown. The loss through inability to handle business during the time the plant is being rebuilt will be as there were many contracts in foicc that were being turned out and the supply was not equal to the demand for the The plant never had been running so smoothly as at the present time and the will make every effort to yet the plant into oper- ation as soon a.s possible. U. S. PROTESTS TO DANISH GOVERNMENT June war excess profit taxes on corporations and partnerships ranging from 12 to 40 per cent and raising in or more than is raised at present were agreed upon to- day by the senate finance committee. The committee has been engaged for some time in revising the revenue bill which will raise and in all probability the measure will not now be changed. Special Program Arranged Will be in the First Pres- j byterian Church j Special Music and Speeches to be Features of the Occasion i Every indication points to tlifl largest mass meeting for women that has been held in Warren in years. It will take place Sunday evening in the Presbyterian church and will com-' mence at sharp. This meeting will be presided-over by the- Rev. Wj C. pastor of the Lutheran church. Theanusic will bo under supervision of Miss Anna assisted by singers from the various churcfies. The program is as Concert tions. Am by Flakier. Invocation. j Hymn. Scripture lesson. W. C. Wallace. Arr. by Blgarj Hymn. Addresses of Rev. Carl Jacobson. triotistn of Our Rev. H. Barr. of A. M. Rickel or Bishop Hamilton.. Hymn. Benediction. Spangled Buck. An offering will be received for thg Red Cross. YEGGS OVERLOOK ANDJJOLD WATCH When robbers took in cash and a gold watch from LpiSenzo of Blue while he lay sleeping irtf the basement of Wallace's livery laat they overlooked which was in his other pockets. Hei reported the matter to the police but as he did not know was with him last or who took hint to the the police Have no clue to work on and are at a loss to how to go to work to find the party. Mattison explained that Be had had but two he said he was fa-fl from being that he knew what he was buying and paving foil and knew every move he was he was a stranger in the city and he asked a young man whom he dicl not know whero he aould go to take a' he was taken to the base- ment of the where he curted up on a pile of baled hay and Trent sleep. When he awoke he laid almost tin-i der the hind feet of a in the swish of the horse's tail in.' face awoke him. His watch was gone. It had been snatched from his as indicated by the broken the bar and a piece of the chain sty.1 rnatning in the buttonhole of his vest. The money which was stolen was taken from the watch pocket of in his hip pocket was let containing and in the side pocket of his trousers was another bank roll containing almost Mat- lison is a woodsman and has working near Blue Jay. He and his brother have the reputation of tlic swiftest bark peelers in the state and the money he had on his person represented the wages of a number of months. The watch was a present to him and he regrets losing it. -don't care so much for the but I am sorry about the he said. THE WEATHEB Today Fair probably followed by thundershowers early Sunday. Somewhat moderate west backing to south winds. Temperature 50 lowest since S p. highest 72. Barometer 28 4-5.   

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