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Titusville Herald  Newspaper Archive: December 13, 1913 - Page 1

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Publication: Titusville Herald

Location: Titusville, Pennsylvania

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   Titusville Herald  (Newspaper) - December 13, 1913, Titusville, Pennsylvania                                WEATHER FORECAST vv Far Saturday and Sunday moderate brisk southwestwinds FIRST DAILY PAPER IN THE OtD REGIONS ESTABLISHED ON JUNE 1805 Memberf of v J Associated Wess VOL 49 NO 157 TITUSVILLE PA SATURDAY DECEMBER 13 1913 THREE THIEF IB TOMil LONG LOST TREASURE UNHARMED YEARS by His Fervor From y Aetotiaied Press Italy Dec jMona liiBa Leonardo Da Vincis great Pointing which was stolen from the liouvre in Paris more than two years agohas been found It in the hkrids of the Italian authorities and be returned to Prance Mono or La Joconde as it IgVlhore popularly known the most portrait pf a women ever been the object of ex baustive i search in all quarters of the The mystery of its abstraction f rbm the LouvreV its great intrinsic value and strange fascination of the smile of the portrayed Giqcpndo the wife of a Wealthy have combined to keep alive interest in its recovery The picture recovered under cyrious circumstances An Italian wrote HoSignoKGeri an antiquary of Florence some weeks ago saying vin possession of the missing Mona Lisa butbeing a patriotic Italian desirei that it shall remain ceaterof Italian art i He Vsigned the letter Leonard the antitiuary at first paid small attention thinking he had to do with zinnia din an Later hovever he com Dr Poggl director of museum whosug he continue tho cor with the man This was done and ah was ar ranged i to view the picture The date set was NoV but events pre verited thev meetirigv A young man gaily rdressed Geri yesterday and and stay discovery of yje painting He added Mona Lisa will be delivered to the wifhv a solemnity worthy Leonardo Da Vinci and a spirit of hap Aptness worthy of Moiia Lisas smile the masterpiece is dear to all Italians as one of these best pro ductions of the genius of race we will be willing tor return it tpits foster country which has regretted its loss so bitterly as a fresh pledge of friendship and brotherhood be tween the two great Latin nations Strangely enough the painting is in an almost perfect state of preserva tion notwithstanding the vicissitudes it must haye Undergone Perugia he had not made a complete confession has admitted that he concealed it under the false bottom of a trunk or fixed it behind the canvas of a worthless sketch PARIS IS EXCITED BY THE GOOD NEWS Reward Goes to the Discoverer PARIS Dec With Mona Lisa found what was regarded as one of the unfathomable mysteries has been solved The sensation1 caused by its recovery was only equalled by that caused by its disappearance in August 1911 editions of the newspapers carried the news the length and breadth of Paris and to night it vwas the sole topic of conver sation The finding of Mona Lisa had been so often announced only to be contradicted news was at flrst considered with but Ambassador Barreres dispatch MTm Rome to the French ministry of pub lic instruction though brief was ex plicit and then the names of the Italian experts mentioned seemed a sufficient guarantee that it was the origitial painting The Florence dealer Geri it is be lieved will be entitled to claim the rewards amounting to 240000 francs offered by the Society of the Friends of the Louvre and various newspapers M Hommole who was director of the Louvre when Mxma Lisa was stolen and who was suspended by the French cabinet because of the loss of the painting was overcome with joy when he learned of its recovery BATTLESHIP VE10NI Geri to go him to see the pic ture The dealer notified D r Poggi Who weritto the hoteland who up orivbeing shown thepainting recog nized it as the genuine Mona Lisa DrPoggi asked to be allowed to take the picture with him so that he nilght compare it with other works He made an appointment to meet Leonard this afternoon to agree upon the price The director took him several officers who placed the man under arrest Employe of the Louvre On being interrogated the prisoner said his real name is Vincenzo Peru gia thiat hei was born in the province of Como is by profession a decorator and is unmarried For six years he liyed in France and for three years was employed at the Louvre Perugia posed as a patriot T was ashamed he said that for more than a century no Italian had thought of avenging the spoliations committed by Frenchmen under Na poleon when they carried off from the Italian museums and galleries pictures statues and treasures of all kinds by wagon loads ancient manuscripts by the thousands and gold by sacks How He Stole Picture He had often observed he said in the Louvre many works of art stolen from Italy and conceived the idea of returning to its home Da Vincis mas terpiece He entered the Louvre ear ly ohomorn ing detached tho picture and removed the painting from tho Irani el He concealed the frame un der trie backstairs where it was after wards found He hid the picture be neatH his workmans blouse and sucv ceedert in leaving the place without attracting suspicion of the theft Perugia was not employed in the Louvre but he knew all the exits and entrances and how to avoid attention He kept the painting concealed he said until his patriotism led him to offer it to the Italian people Positively Identified The painting has also been identi fied1 by Dr Ricci director general of the department of flne arts who was dispatched hurriedly to Florence from Rome by the minister of public in struction Ltiigia Credaro After a careful examination Dr Ricci tele phoned to the minister who was in credulous Ricci said I will stake my head on it do not care for your head but if this news after it is published is found not to ba true you will be dis missed Dr Ricci answered I will take full responsibility and am ready to risk dismissal Discovery Announced News of the discovery of Mona Lisa spread in the chamber of depu ties in session at Rome where ex tremist members were engaged in fisticuffs in an endeavor to prevent a vote upon the election of a National deputy for Rome The disorder ceased immediately The deputies Burrounded the minister of public in struction who exhibited a telegram from Ricci the statement he had already made by telephone Signor Credaro announced that he had immediately notified the French Ambassador Camille Barrere of the Main Shaft Breaks and SoveraiGonipaftmeiits Are Flooded BU Associated Press WASHINGTON Dec her starboard main shaft broken and sev eral of her compartments flooded the battleship Vermont 5s limping toward Hampton Roads on her return from the Mediterranean cruise under con voy of the battleship Delaware and the colliers Orion and Jason The accident occurred at a m yesterday and at 8 oclock last night the Vermont was 1200 miles from Hampton Roads and COO miles from Bermuda A radiogram to the navy department from Rear Admiral Charles E Badger commanderinchief of the Atlantic fleet describing the accident said there was no cause for alarm The Vermont is proceeding to Hampton Roads un der her port engine making eight knots in a comparatively smooth sea Admiral Badger says the skin of the ship and the propeller strut were ex amined by a diver and appeared unin jured Neither the shafting nor thr propeller was lost The Vermont and her convoys should arrive at Hampton Roads about Dec 17 or 18 The battleships Wyoming Arkansas Florida and Utah of the returning Mediterranean squadron are contina ing toward New York where they are expected to arrive next Monday The Connecticut Kansas and Ohio are proceeding toward Guantanamo en route to Mexican waters DR MacALLISTER DIED ON THURSDAY Former Head of Brexel Passed Away at Sea fU Axnciatetl Prctg PHILADELPHIA Dec Tames MacAllister for twenty years president of Drexel Institute of this city and an educator of international reputation died at sea yesterday on the steamship Carribean bound from New York to Bermuda according to a wire less message received today He re signed thepresidency of the institute last June because of ill health Dr MacAllIster was the head of tho schools of Milwaukee from 1874 to 1881 and later became a regent of Wis consin normal schools He was at one time a lecturer at Johns Hopkins col lege and at the College of the City ot New York He waa a trusteeof the University of Pennsylvania and in 1890 was elected an officer of LAca demie Paris Dr MacAllister was a liberal con tributor to literature mainly on ped agogical subjects He was 73 years old SHAKEUP AT CHICAGO CHICAGO Dec resigna tions of five members of the school board who are said to have voted apainst the reelection of Mrs Ella Flagg Young as superintendent were accepted tonight by Mayor Harrison to take effect at once In accepting the resignations Mayor Harrison said that be would remove other opponents of Mrs Young If he had the power DRAMATIC AT COMMITTEE A S K E D FOB MEETING V VOTE IS THE Republicans May Work Out a New Scheme to Apportion Delegates t t Jilt Associated Ircss WASHINGTON Dec Tho Re publican national congressional cam paign comrijittee went on record as fa voring a national convention of tho Republican party next year and en dorsed three plans as suggestions for reapportioriment of delegates to future conventions It was resolved by the committee called togetherhy its chairman Rep resentative Woods of Iowa that in its judgment Objects of Meetina A special national convention of the Republican party should he held as soon as practicable for the purpose of taking action relative to the appor tionment of delegates to the national nominating of delegates to the party to the unit of representation to the full recognition of theprimary laws of the states pertaining to the election of delegates and members ot national committee and the timf when the latter shall take office and such other matters as may seem de sirable This resolution will be submitted to the Republican national committee which meets here next Tuesday to gether with the plans suggested for re apportionment of tho delegates to na tionalconventions The present dele gate representation in a national con vention is 1026 The first suggestion ofthe congressional committee which would make tho total delegate repre sentation 1044 is as follows How it Would Work For each of such districts in which the vote cast for the Republican candidates for presidential electora in IJOg was not more than 40 per cent electors in such districts in said elec tion one delegate for each or such districts in which suca Republican vote was 40 per cent but hot morethan 60 per cent two dele gates for each of such districts in which auch Republican vote was more than 60 per cent three delegates In tiny state where a reapportionment act has not been passed to provide the full number of congressional districts such state will be entitled delegates atlarge for each representativeat large in congress at the above ratio comparing the full vote of the state with total Republican vote in the state In Arizona and New Mexico the apportionment shall be based on dele gates in congress Upon this basis representations from the southern states would be diminished and in some of the states it would be increased For example Alabama would be reduced from 28 to 22 Ar kansas from 28 to 20 Georgia from 28 to South Carolina 18 to 11 and other southern states accordingly New York would increase 90 to 108 Massachusetts from 36 to 44 Illinois from 58 to Cl and so on Another Plan Alternative rcapportlonment plans suggested are the following Fourdeegatesatlarge for each state and in addition thereto one dele gate for each 10000 votes or major traction thereof cast for the Republi can candidates for presidential elec tors in 1008 or four delegatesatIarge for each state and for each congres sional district one delegate for each 10000 votes or major fraction there cast for the Republican candidates presidential electors cast in 1008 Provided that each congressional district shall have at least one dele gate and there shall be two for each congressmanatrlarge The former plan would cut the total delegate representation to 045 and tho latter to 1028 Members the com mittee who joined in support of the resolutions represented twentystates CARNEGIE CALLED ON THE PRESIDENT Says Times Are Going to Be Better RV Aianclnted WASHINGTON Dec Andrew Carneglo visited the White House to day to inquire after President Wil sons health He talked with Secretary Tumulty about world peace and went to tho state department later to pursue the subject with Secretary Bryan As he left the White House Mr Car negie said he thought business condi tions wore going to be better than ever after the now legislation which congress has in hand is passed He expressed his gratification at the award of the Nobel prize to Senator Root I think Senator Root is one of the wisest men in America he said Pres ident Roosevelt Baid so Lord Norlev told me he thought so and I believe the best thing the Republican convention could do would be to nominate him for President TRIAL Detective Reads Mans ponfession Press NEW YORK Dec Hans Schmidts coufesslori of themurder of Anna was road today into the record of his trial by Polled In spector Faurpt in command ottho de tective bureau It was Faurpt who arrested Schmidt an6 to liJm the one time priest told the story of his crime Leaving the witness clialr Faurot stepped before the jury box and with dramatic gesture and word reenacted tho scono of the confession From his seat the prisoners dock Schmidt viewed the uausual proceedings with unchanged stolidity of expression f slapped Schmidt on the back whoa I flrst saw him said the inspector and said Como now tell us tho whole truth about the thing Schmidt sank into a chair aiid buried his faca n his hands and uegan to cry Present ly he said r killed Uor because I loved her Before we left Schmidt tried to embrace Father Quinii who was with me but Father Quinn avoided him Father Quinn asked Are you a regular ly of God and Schmidt replied I5 was ordained by Saint Elizabeth HEAD OF COLLEGE OUSTED ON FRIDAY i Three Years Trouble Is Ended By AssociatedPress SEATTLE Wash dent Thomas Francis Kane of theUni versity of Washington was removed from office today bythe board of regents who unanimously adopted a resolution declaring the office vacant The action was the climax of an agitation that has lasted tbree years inwhich a majority ofthefaculty and students are reporteimb haye aligned themselves against President Kane Resolutions ITI t J at theConventionat Beading By Awocfafed READING Dec The State Granges adjourned here this afternoon after a four days session A feature was the presence this forenoon of suf fragettes and antJsuffragettes sent here by the stated committees who tried to convert tlie Grangers to1 their cause The Grange night en dorsed womans rsitff rage A resolution passed on tho subject of proliobition says in part Religiously booze stultifies tho conscience benumbs the morals makes a brute of him who was created in the image of the Creator drags down and degrades manhood be smirches and disgraces womanhood ridicules and belittles the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God Morally rum weakens the intellect makes liars and thieves of otherwise honorable beings it starves children emaciates helpless women and makes repulsive bloated besotted creatures of its patrons Socially the rlrihk traffic makes a babbling idiot of its victim causes women and men to do things and acts that the Instinct of the common dog would refrain from it disgraces the brightest of tho sons and daughters and causes the premature grey hairs of the father and mother Financially vast sums of money are worse than wasted The high cost of living fades into insignificance be side the high cost of the nations drink bill wages are wasted estates are squandered and tradesmen are beaten out of their bills large numbers oi people are employed it the traffic and thereby become nonproducers and have to be fed by tiie labor of the pro ducing classes Vast numbers of our citizens are incapacitated for earning a living thereby becoming a public burden on tho industrious toiler groat sums of money are diverted from the legitimate channels of trade thereby crippling and paralyzing industry BRACELET IS HELD AT CUSTOM HOUSE Found by Maid and Is Claimed by Marquis flu Aafocialed Preae WOW YORK Dec A gold brace let Htudden with gems and valued a 50000 found by a maid and clatrnor by a nobleman was held by custom inspectors berr today until Home one pays duty on it The bracelet was ifound on a traV between Liverpool and London by maid employed by F Greenwood o ibis city Mr Greenwood was en trusted with the bracelet and shortlj afterwards the Marquis De San Carlo de Pedroso claimed it His descriptlor of the article did not satisfy Mr Green wood who refused to surrender It When the Mauretania arrived here to day there was a dispute upon the pic between MrGrcenwood and the mar quls This the inspectors ended hold Ing the bracelet for payment of duty FLETCHERS DEMAND IS OBEYED REBELS GAINING Federals Are Driven Back to the Protection of the Gunboat Bravo Jy Axsotiiattil Press MEXICO CITY Dec Ad niral Fletcher commander of the American naval forces in Mexican wa ters today ordered tho rebels and federals fighting at Tamplco1 to cense firing threatening to open lire on thorn with tho guns of tho gunboat Wheeling if his orders Wcro not obeyed Doth sides complied with the order Tlits information is contained in a dispatch received tonight by Sir Lionel ardon tho British minister from Rear Admiral Sir Christopher Cradock of the British cruiser Berwick which s lying off Tampioo Will Protect Foreigners The federals hold tho center pC tho own of Tampico and tho watir front Rpar Admiral Fletcher 1ms ordered foreigners to take refugo on board iliips or to congregate on the water front where they will be under tho protection of his guns TWO thousand federals at Tampico protected by tho shells of the gunboat Bravo more than by their own efforts were yetvvaiting late today a forward mbvement of the rebels or some other maneuver that might deckle the fate of tho seaport Tho lighting which began two days ago was then contin uing and the best indications were that it might last another day or oven longer How many rebels are engaged in tlie attack on Tampico isnot known but it is estimated their number is at least twice that of tho federals aud their operations indicate that they ejc pectod more men from Victoria capi tal of the state of Tamaulipas which lays between Tampico and Monterey to tho Tho rebels who are in possession of the railroad yards and shops and largii stores of material and equipment havo actually detached from their lines suf ficient men to undertake repairing the railroad north and west from Tampico toward Victoria The damage that has been done this line while enough to prevent the operation of trains la nol so serious that it will long delay re sumption of tralllc Most of the de stroyedbridges being small ones they can bo easily replaced Repairs to tho roadsouthward from Victoria is also being rushed and it not Improb able that the rebels will bo able to transport fresh troops and additional artillery supplies in time Ur use them at Tampico before tho government can get reinforcements to the port Occasional shells fell in the heart of the city of Tampico during tho diiy and bullets from rllios ami machine guns were numerous enough to make it advisable that all residents not en gaged In the operations seek cover For the most part the Ilring was llrii tted to the artillery of the rebels and guns of the Bravo Battle Is Expected Dec ful strength of the rebel army is report cd to be approaching Ojinaga wit the purpose of starting a siege and possi ble attack from i000 to HOOO are in the vicinity awaiting reinforcements and rebel General Francisco Villa who lu to start from Chihuahua MAN AND WOMAN KILLED IN WRECK Bodies Found Beneath an Auto WfLMfNGTON Dec T Moore a travelling salesman for i Philadelphia tobacco house but a ror idcnt of Salisbury Md and MTH Harrj Pinrco a widow of Wilmington wcr kellcd in un automobile accident to tlay near Newark Del So fur a known to the police no one saw accident The automobilo was fount overturned with the lifeless bodies o the man and woman pinned bencatf it The accident occurred on smooth Htrctch of road Several per sons who saw tho automobile a shor time before it was found wrecked naU that it was not running at an execs sivo speed Moore IcftPhiladelphialaHt Saturdv in an automobile owned by Cho Phil adelphia firm which employed him 1K hnd been viHiting tobacco dealers in Wilmington und was KuppOKcd to b on a business trip through tlie count when the accident occurred Heleave a widow nnd one davighter in Sallsburv Mrs Pierces husband died la August He was 4a Ralcaman for tb same firm and Moore BiccRcded to hi territory when Pierce died PRINCELY BEQUEST LONDON Dec is announcer that the will of late Sir Itiliu CharloH Wernher who was a mcmbe of the firm of Wernher Belt ft Co diamond merchants King Sdward fnmi soon will receive 000 and additional 1000000 later VIRS MACKAY DIES ON OPERATING TABLE Coroner Is Conducting an Inquiry Hit Associated Press NRW YORK Dec coroners hyslctan began today an investigation if the dentil of Mrs Helen L Mack ay vidow of tho Rov Dr Donald Sago tackny for many years pastor of the lollcgiate church ot StNicholas on avemio and president of ihe gen rnl synod of the Reformed churchin kiuorlca Mrs Mackay diod yesterday ternoon under the Influence of other vlven at her own request on an oper tinR table in a private hospital whoro be had registered a fow hours before vs Mrs J H Stone of Boston A scrap of paper iirhsrhaiidbag led o her identification The belief that lib was Crorii an incurable llsenso lod her to visit the hospital for in examination according to the thc ny of the coroner Until onrly today tho body lay un jlaimed Then a daughter sought to in vo tho body removed to an under akors She waa not permitted to do intil tho coronors examination should inve been completed Mrs Mackay was H daughter oC tho ate J Gregor Smith one time gov rnoiof Vermont from whom she la loritcd a largo fortune She was proin nont in New York society Dr Mnck ty died smldonlv in a railroad station n Portland August 100S DYNAMITE USED FIEND BY POLICE AEE AT WORK Infernal Machine Similar to One Sent to Judge in 1911 MAN Y SHOT IN EBIES STRIKE Strikebreaker Fired Upon From Behind 1S1HF Pa Dec Trouble broko out afroah tonight in connection with the strike of moulders hero and as ix rpsult one man is boliovcd to bo dy K In St Vincents hospital Tolm and Fritz Lawreuco atriko breakers wero on their wav liomo from work when they wereat tacked from behind Snenor was shot in the back of tho nock and tho leCt aide Lawreuco was not much injured SIPPED BY Kbnetchy and JBpb HarmoriK flii AHsnvlntrtJ NEW YORK Doc of the most important baseball trades mado in the National league in recent years were consummated here tonight in volving more than half tho clubs of the league Chlbf among the deals In the dispo sal of Too Tinker recently deposed as Cincinnatis manager Tinker was bought by Brooklyn for If ho agrees to play with the team that pur chased hlm be will receive 10000 of the sum the rent of tho money going to the Cincinnaticlub The other sensational shakeups in the 1914 personnel of tho senior major league are Charley Herzogi thirl baseman and catcher of New York to Cincinnati In exchange for Bob I3dward IConetchy first baHemaM H and Hob Ifairmn pitcher all of St Louis go to Pittsburgh in exchange fnr John Wilier first baseman J O Wilson outfielder Arthur Butler in liohlcr Albert baseman and J II The trades were the outcome of ne gotiations carried on by National league club owners during tho leagues anutial meeting concluded lust night The saleof Tinker whose services had been eagerly sought by at least three major league clubs disposes of an eleventh hour rumor that August Herrmann president of the iCincitniaU club had changed his mind about letting tho famous short stop go and bad decided to retain him manager for another year The acnuiiiitlon of who wan a JO 12 worlds championship player means in all probability that the Giant third baseman of last season will bo selected to manage the Reds next season 7y Associated Press NEW YORK Doc Anue wltz a girl of 18 employed as confi dential bookkeeper of the 0 K Bottling company at 528 West fifth street was killed today bomb soul to her employers Thomats McCabe managing salesman wascut in the head by flying metal and Michael Ryan an employe outside the officer waa injured by shatteied glass The desk on the bomb was placed as Miss y wlU opened it waa demolished anilVt the office was wiecked Tho bomb was delivered by tne diivor of an expiess wagoji It lay unopened amid letters and packages for an hour on desk awaiting hor arrival cut the coid and removed wrapping paper when the packageexx ploued Apparently it contained dy namita as tho oi the explosion J v was downward Detectives afc Work Who sent tho nuestlous that sent halfa hundiredvor move detectives at work on1 possible cluo Piecing libbons of tho brown cbverink1 they found that the tempted to print tho name botl tllng company in black In upper loft Jaand corner In wilting the return State street New York building at this address ofllce building porting firms who of foreigners Detectivesbi addressto bo fictitious 0 work to interview every tho buIMinjj Another teotlyes sought presg company bomb r K The bureau Ing on the mystery wJtlf the few J of metalfound In tho annovmced that ithe1 missilewas similar construction to the sent to Judge Rosalsky about yearsago Wllllnm H Callahan the bottling company saidthat had no enemies and denied1 ments of several of his employea tljjit he had recently discharged thirty workmen v 3 v COTTON CROP FELL BELOW THE RECORD TJie large t UNITED EFORTTO GET FEDERAL HELP Commission Is Convention Most Valuable However in History By AnKOKliilril Vrcna WASHINGTON Dec crop of pounds of cotton not in cluding linters was produced in the United States during the season of 1913 the department of agriculture reported today This ia the third in size or record that of 1011 which amounted to 7ir0rMO000 pounds being the record and that of last when 0851710 000 pounds were grown being second TblK years crop probably will be the most valuable ever grown in tlie Unit ed States At the average farm valuo of cotton on Nov 1 was 13 cents it H worth S50rj75500 The previous moat valuable crop was that of 1010 which was valued at All the states with the oxccptlon of Mississippi Louisiana Missouri and Oklahoma produced crops better than the avcrago of tho past five years whlle Georgia Alabama and South Carolina produced their secondlarg est crop and Texas Its third largest PHILADELPHIA Dec Uon which petitions the President cot the United States to appoint acom mission from civil life to majce a thorough Investigation cjuesttpu of federal appropriations for roafl con struction wasadopted atrtheclqslnK session here this the dele gates attending the tenth annual con vention of tho American RoadBuild ers association and Its afflHatedrbodr the Good Roads congress The resolution called attention to the fact that several other organlratlons are working same lines aa the American Builders association and states itilsr evident that thia work can be accomplished by complete co operation or amalgamation with othtip associations working with tho same broad purposes v The resolution further said thevled eral congress In the nearfutureWill take some action leading to thepar ticipation In the building pf rbgtfs bY1 the government and in order that such legislation should as enactedbo fair and equitable andthattba monevs that are appropriatedshallbo spent without undue influence bypoll tlcinns it is advisable organizationsshould present aunited point of view to congress it 3 NEAELY DESTROYED Historic Spot Scene of a Fire By Associated BALTIMORE Dec ned by a high wind for a time i thIa afternoon threatened to devastate4 his toric Fort McHenry the Star Spangled Banner Burning grass ignited the adminis tration building and the officers quar ters and the barracks gered v Before the fire was extinguished three rooms of the administration building were wrecked completely About an acre of grass was biiriierf Fort McHenry has been for some time a deserted post Only caretak ers remain Sparks from abon fire started the blaze   

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