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Smethport McKean Democrat: Thursday, September 1, 1910 - Page 1

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   McKean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - September 1, 1910, Smethport, Pennsylvania                                THE Me H VOL. XXXIII. s. LINDSLEY COMPANY PUBLISHERS SMETHPOUT, McKEAN COUNTY, PA., SEPTEMBER 1, 1910. TERMS: PCn YCAFI IN ADVANCE NO. 20 THAT POSTAL RULING. j Protecting Foods. ____ I The peaky house lly has a hard The Centre County Publisher Take Action of it, but the rules laid down in tlie Matter. The Bellefonte Democrat of last week I time by the Pure Food Association of Pennsylvania ,ire mm IQO u is liulNe are tnc spreaders of dis- saya: A meeting of the publishers of tnal slrjct curc should always Centre county was held in Bellefonteon ils prevention of con- i tiunjnilicil food. Friday, for the purpose of discussinu the recent postal laws, and ro take such xiiese rules apply to all places where l steps as will prove a protection to their I js uv S01d. The State is go-' business in the Ir The following j to a in the matter and papers were r' .esented: Bellefonte j fooli tu ijC protected. Mcrch-' Republican, Q ere Democrat, Centre and fruits Hall Reportr1 Democratic Watchinan, I not with netting are liable and State College j A of The rules follow: Times. T' j Millheim Journal and How- j Every person being in charge of i ard llu'' .er, while not represented, sent sucl) shall keep it in a clean sam-' notice .nat each would cooperate in any j tary j acti' taken. j z. Shelves, trays, baskets or other re-' ceptack'S for food must he kept clean I and free from decayed matter. j 3. All provisions must be raised two! feet from floor or sidewalk unless in j ".ie principal point taken up for uis- was the recent Postal Law in to subscribers who are oycr year due and hi'.ve not express- ly renewed the same. The postal au- thorities have notified the publishers that they must arrange their business glass cases. Dogs are prohibited in food stores. 5. Personal cleanliness must, be exact- within a limited time, and therefore it i of was decided that between tliis and Oct. I Q_ pcrson suffering from tuuercu- 1st to cut delinquent subscribers trom the mailing list who have not complied with this law. The limit of credit being- only one losis or other communicable disease shall be employed where he or she will come in contact with food or foodstuffs. 1. All garbage must be covered and CKED1TORS MAKE ANOTHER MUVE. Livetyiuen Noi Affected. Although the people of Oil Cily are sulVermg as geiicrally f rnni the iiutomo-, ,he nciHnn Enltcil B.iiik Will bile fever us those of otlu'r citK'S of its JIakt-Another Efloit. class, I lie forebodings I'xprosicd some lime the ownership of so many 'Hie Kldred Kagle says: While tho call machine.-; and so many otIVml fio- hire j through the liable last week didn't (rot would put (be liverymen out of business circulated nut of town in lime to, many country residents to gel in, lo the meet- on Saturday last, there were, present to make Ihe ears bank wreckers tingle and to go ahead with tins plans of criminal I has proved unfounded. James H. Clark has been in the livery business for the] past '25 years, iiml than whom none in; enough the oil country is better posted, says I that his business has increased fully per eenl. since the people of Oil City action against those connected with the commenced lo invest in automobile.-., j institution. An agreement was drawn Une reason ascribe.! is that owners of "overing the following points: Iroin a trip! 1- The creditors agree to stand to- throughout the country districts here- j getber and pay their prorata cost of almuls, advertise tho pleasures uf slurl j prosecution, according to the amount jaunts and people who do not led they had in the bank nt the time it dally able to indulge in the luxury of closed. a machine of their own, content them- Z. That the agreement was made an selves with hiring livery rigs. Another i "''der on the Trustee for their part of incentive is the improvement of roads the costs if they were not paid at the the automobile has come to be a u dividend was declared. 3. That no criminal action can be ilhdrawn except by the majority vote Nebraska Bill's Wild West. year, on account of the recent postal Amoved as frequently as possible. law, no doubt it will offend many good, honest readers, who are not accustomed or disposed to regulate their affairs that way, and will censure the publisher. Al- ready we have lost a number of unduly sensitive persons, who were friends for years, as subscribers, who regard the receiving of a bill a reflection upon their integrity and resented it by ordering the paper discontinued at once. About Saturday, October 1st, the next meeting of the publishers will be held and at that time each will have his list of delinquents made up and the en- tire lot will then he compiled in a gen- eral Hat ot all the newspaper delin- quents in Centre county. A copy of same will be furnished each publisher in Centre county, and thus each will have the information at hand to show the name of anybody who owes a pub- lisher for a newspaper, and has not paid for it. In this way it will be prac- tically imposible for a man to take a paper for a few years, drop it when pay is demanded, and then subscribe for 1 become a 'professional "roun- der." After this, it looks as though it will be difficult for a man to take ad- S. Shops must ue closely screened du- ring the lly season. 9. Refrigerators must be kept clean and free from odor. 10. Cellars ma-it be ventilated and kept clean. 11. Berries, fruit, vegetables, fish or other foods must not be exposed tofties or dust in open doors or windows or on the sidewalk. 12. All prepared foods, cheese, cook- ing meats, honey, pickles, olives, sauer kraut, mince meat, bread, cakes, lard, butter, figs, dates and mackerel or oth- er prepared fish must be covered so aa to exclude dust and flies. 13. Proper utensils must be used in serving the above foods, as little hand- ing with the hands as possible. 14. No diseased, decayed or otherwise unwholesome food shall be offered for sale or gift. 15. Flour must be raised from the This attraction will be one of the strong features at the Big McKcan County Fair next Shott History ot Womeu's Ulubs. We are asked what is the scope of the Woman's Club? The growth of the club movement his in a way been slow anil well considered. From the beginning high character has been the organized in 1S'J2, and has never looked backward sir.ce its organization. Its work commenced us a literary club but year by year the vital questions oc cupyinc the minds of the club womei have crept in nnd found lodgment in the hearts of its members. vantage of mire, than one paper, as he will then be properly rated, and at the end of his string. Every honest man in Centre county- is proud of his rating and we believe will endorse such a course. There was further discussion m re- gard to adopting heroic measures for the collection of the various delinquent subscription accounts, but no definite action was taken at this meeting. We believe the public in time will ap- prove of this action taken by the pub- lishers, as no honest man will be an- noyed or injured, or have cause for com- plaint. In Aid ot Mr. Adams. The employes of the United Natural Gas Company are signing a subscnp- floor and protected from dust by cover- ing. 16. Fruit and vegetables must be kept from decayed matter. The law, it will be seen, is very rigid and punishment for its violation severe and yet it is volated every day in every town and city of Pennsylvania. This fact, however, will not excuse any one who is caught and prosecuted as an ex ample. A Fine Concrete Residence. Some few years ago Thomas A. Eddi son predicted that as lumber grew les and more expensive the coming bulk ing would be made of cement. Tha this prediction is being verified one ca discover by taking a walk over to th Brooklyn side and seeing whac to allap ard of our nation. Therefore.if it is to ad ambition, power, strife for wealth, s principles should be intelligently id universally taught. They must e made a part of the child's arly home education. The home nd the school are the institutions n which the life and character of our S'ation is builded. The world has earned that literature is a vital ele- ment in the home and community; no nfluence may be stronger in the mak- np; of character. Through its influ- nce svoman's clubs were formed; hrough its influence woman looked 3Ut on life witii n keener vision, and ,aw the work Goc! rpu given her to do. since permanent institution. Autoists have "stirred up" the country pathmastevo, have caused constables to make proper returns of neglected roads to court and have paid out their own money to im- prove highways, all of which increases, tile pleasure of those who confine their riding to the horse anil buggy. It is u fact so patent that it has not escaped general notice, that the owners of carriage teams pay much more at- tention to the "smart" effect of their cquippages in Oil City now than they d before their neighbors acquired a urmg car. Any iden that the horse is had his dav as an accessory to a sbionable means of locomotion could ot the subscribers according lo tho amount of their claims. After this paper was drawn up sub- seriptions amounting were thereon at once. to over Twice as much planning and thc.fuccessful result of :he Sanitary originated and carried forward by forth confidence, the welcome knowl- edge that they had brain and muscle, ability that had hitherto been dor- mant. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott effected the organization of the National Suffrage Association in 18J8. Susan B. Anthony soon joined they began the formation of mdividua clubs. in 1859, Ihe Minerva Club was formec in New Harmony, Indiana, but to Jen nie June belongs the honor of organiz The club has a membership of '15 members, comprising many of the representative women of the commu- nity. The club house, purchased last year, is to be repaired, making a large ant! commodious assembly of the two medium-sized rooms now in use. The country chosen for this year's travel and stuily is Scandinavia. Members of the club will havecharge of the Rest Room at the McKean County Fair on Friday, Sept. 9th, and the fol- lowing will act as hostesses: From D a. m., until 11 o'clock, Misses Choate Biever, Anderson; from 11 o'clock unti 1 p. Backus Hogarth; 1 o'clock unti MefdamesABrow.nell, il4 o'cWk'until close, Mesdames Fo-.-sy the, son, Gorton. otlnst long in the mind of any one in il City. 'Prices of horses are higher at the resent time than they have ever been, fair driving horse suitable for livery said Mr. Clark, "that 10 years go could have been bought for to 100, readily now. A strong, ound draught team from five to nine ears old does not wait a purchaser long f offered around and looks do not ount in the transfer a little bit. There re farmers in this and adjoining coun- who have well matched, sound iung horses that they are using in arm work to whom an offer of from SOO.to team would be no more may be added, although the sub- scription may not be held open utter enough has been subscribed to make n uood fund and auflicient notice is given. After this was completed a Committee was elected to engage counsel and be- gin proceedings, the committee being Chas. Phalon, Thus. Zeigler and B. G. McFall. Monday attorney T. F. Mullin, of Bradford, was over and information made out against J. U. A. Young, C. 1'. Collins, W. L. Christman and A. E. Sloan, on charges euflicient to keep them busy with their attorneys hunting up new legal phrases to get be- hind for some time. The cases' already started are Mrs. Julia Cnmbia, who sold her house through the bank nearly a month tn sell fore it closed, tho money from which was put in tho bank funds and appro- priated to their own use, and Mrs. Mary Horan, who three times demanded sev- eral hundred dollars she had on deposit and couldn't fret from whom they accept several dollars in currency t tion paper to raise a fund, the proceeds of which are to be used to help defray C. H.Adams' traveling expenses and the time and expenteof a detective employed by Mr. Adams to search for his boy, Ed- win Adams, who has been missing from his home at Lamont Station since April 16. Mr. Adams has spent nearlyone-half of his time since that date looking up clues and going to different places, and while his salary has been paid during this time by the company that he works for, his expenses have been so heavy that he has exhausted the savings of his lifetime in various expenses. He will not be able to continue the search unless he has outside help. Mr. Adams' fellow workmen and em- ployes of the United Natural Gas Com- pany in eeneral have so far raised about to be used in helping to defray the expenses and to continue the search. Any one wishing to subscribe a small amount to this cause may do so at the offices of the United Natural Gas Com- pany, No. 75, Main street; at Ihe oitice of the Era, or Bend the amount direct to C. H. Adams, Kane, Pa.-Bradford Era. street merchant, and the work is being done by Wm. Black, at a cost of one- third less than a frame house of the same size would cost. Then there is the consideration that it will not need painting every two or three years. It will be a handsome residence and a credit to the owner. With the same material B. C. Gallup has built one of the hand- inent women all over the world, in call- Church streets. The cement makes a together a congress of women in 1873 at Union Square Theatre. This congress held meetings annually until superceded by the General Federation of Women's Clubs, formed in New York at the Sorosis Club rooms, in March, 1889. States began the agita- tion of State Maine being the first to organize in 1892 Pennsyl- vania was organized in 1895. At the last Federation 205 clubs were credited to Death ot t Little Boy. The sad news reached Smethport o Saturday last of the death of httl John Donald of Harve M. MacQuiston and the late Agnes Coy MacQuiston, and grandson of D and Mrs. H. L. McCoy, of Smethpor which occurred at VanVleck, Texas, o Friday, August, 26, 1910, of peritonite after an illness of three days. The particulars at this writing a meagre, just the mere announcement the passing away of the little one. Joh Donald MacQuiston was born at the home of his grandparents, in this bor- ough, on Dec. 31, 1906, and wan consej quontly nearly four years of age at the time of his death. After the deatl. of mother he was taken to the South- west by his father, and placed in the careof Mr. MacQuiston's peoule. Little John Donald MacQuiston is well remem- bered in Smethport as a sweet, loveable child, and the family will have the sin ceresy mpathy of a wide circle of friends in the affliction that has come upon them. The funeral was held in VanVleck Let George Do George Did. Hon. Joseph C. Sibley, who has, evi- Jently, gotten himself into hot water in the 28th Congressional district on ac- count of his lavish outlay of the "dol- lars of our daddies" to secure nis nom- ination for Congress at the late prima- ries, in his late attempt at an explana- tion undertakes to shift all the blame to the shoulders of our friend, Frank K. Taylor, his private secretary. We hardly thought "HonestJoe" would try to crawl out of such a small hole, after being so liberal in spending his moneyjn the Sibley-Emery campaign in this coun- ty a few years ago. At that time Mr. Sibley, to all'outward appearances, was in the pink of good health, and without a blemish, physically speaking. Now, to make a scape goat of Mr. Taylor is. to say the least, not fair on the part of our friend, Kibley. .make fo -ve-fle tions rift. Otheir.afpr., are under consideration an Mrs. George L. Smith, of Drift-1 wood, is the guest" of her sister, Mrs. F. A. Gallup. Surprise Oil Co. are giving a picnic on tho County- Farm to-day to their families and friends. Harold Schooler, a former Smeth- port boy, now of Rochester, was a may be brought. The McAuliffe case brought a year ago by Mr. Mullin, and postponed sev- eral times, 'hasn'tgiven the bank wreck- ers much worry, and it is stated that satisfactory settlements are to be made with all that went in with him, and if such is the case, it is probable that nothing will come of it, and, had not the action of the pnst week been started, the gang would have gotten off with no sentence and a probable -10 or 50 per cent, settlement of their liabilities in spite of the valiant and honest rep- resentations they have made to pacify the creditors all along. What a cheap lot of guys this community would af- ford if they allowed themselves to be- politely robbed of or and then let the gang laugh at them after the danger ot prosecution was It would have been a fine joke when any one you would have, been on your fighting mettle from the start if one of your neighbors had swiped one of chickens, or something less valuable. Take off your hat to the fellow that robs you politely of all you have, but don't forget that you have a boot on, either foot. rnurcn street ,e a membership above very effective budding material.-) ort, The clubs of the Federation of Allegany Reporter. A Fine Exhibit. Mr. Guy McCoy, hustling sec- Pennsylvania women are working for literature, libraries, civics, civil service reform, woman suffrage, music and of the McKean County As- LFI. nn- j last Sunday, and the interment was j guest of his father the past week. made in that place. A Big Timber Deal. James Mclntyre, of Bolivar. has purchased of W. S. Wells, of Little The New Course ot Study. Adequate provision will be made at the Clarion State Normal School for carrying into effect the provisions of the new four year course of study for Nor- mal Schools. Students may enter the Junior Class this fall and still be gradu- ated in the three year course. This fall will be a good time to enter and get started toward the completion of the course. Write to J. George Becht, Principal, Clarion, Pa., tor circulars and information. sociation, came oyer from the county seat Saturday and brought with him a fine line of loving cups, which the As- sociation purchased for prizes to be given to the firemen who win prizes. The rules governing the Northwestern As- sociation will ueused on Firemen's Day. The protest of the Kane Fire Depart- ment regarding the manner in which the prizes were to be awarded was heeded and instead of scoring the points the company winning will be awarded the first prize. This clears up the situation and the Kane Fire Department will undoubtedly attend and take a band with them. The prizes are worth going after, the boys will undoubtedly pick out the pri- zes they deserve and bring them home, as we know of no other fire organiza- tion in the county that can beat the Kane Boys Republican. For sale. Three-year-old horse colt, weight about 800 pounds. Dark brown in col -IT e yun-naawij u. pm anthropy free acrcs of timber, le olaverounns, VII- ___ e ___ Students desiring board please apply to P. O. Box 632, Smethport, rates, etc. Pa., for or. For further information address or call on S. F. Murphy, Ormsby, 1'a. Read the DEMOCRAT. kindergartens, public playgrounds, lago improvement, social hygiene, for- estry and horticulture, pure food, do- mestic science and education. And character is the touchstone that makes all the rest possible. Fifteen thousand dollars is being raised to be devoted to a permanent scholarship at State College in Home Economies. This work is in the hands of a competent committee who are de- voting time and energy to its accom- plishment. Homemaking and home- keeping constitute a business more perplexing and difficult than any other inown to modern life, and one that is worthy the name of profession. "We believe that 'right living' should be the fourth 'R' in education; that on the home foundation is built all that is good and strong in State or individual; that illness results from carelessness, unhcalthful food or strong drink; that the care of children demands more study than the raising of chickens, anc that the most interesting study for the past week the athletes I of Smethport High School have been in active training for Field Day at the Fair. At first it was thought that Smethport would not be a contestant, but the new principal, Prof. Bright, on located on the Wells farm in Bolivar and Genesee townships. It is said the purchase price was about i the boys. This is the finest tract of standing I as much arriving in town, and on learning of the state of affairs, at once took charge of Although there is not quite material as last year, still woman is home, for in it centres all the issues of life." The Travellers' Club, of Smethport Turn the Standpatters ment and Heform. Tho Pittsburg Post predicts the Con- gressional and Gubernatorial elections in November will show Democratic gains all over the country. This is a Demo- cratic year and all Democrats should watch developments by reading the grand, old reliable morning Post. Its resources for obtaining and printing al the news are not equalled by any other paper. Notify your newsdealer. timber in Allegany county. It is esti-j there is enough to represent Smethport mated there are feet of beech, [with credit.__________ Girls wanted at the Grand Central fotel, Smethport, to wait on the table luring Fair week. Good wages, and jirch, maple, cherry, ash, etc., cet of first and second growth pine; aliout worth of chestnut poles, ind between and cords of chemical wood. Mr. Mclntyre will probably erect a portable saw mill on the tract and saw Ihe timber into lumber. The chemical wood will be shipped to Coryvillc, Pa., for Breeze. To Black-List Dead Beats. The publishers of papers in Centre county are now considering the forma- tion of a protective association by which it will be difficult for any one who is cast off a mailing list and not paid his subscription to secure another paper in the county, as any one who will not pay one publisher for the paper he has read will be very likely to do so with is an undesirable patron and other publishers having such informa- I tion at hand will not be eager for his Democrat. Such an organization among newspa- lenty of time to see the Fair. Choice winter wheat for per bushel for sale. On the market Sept. 10th. Winter rye per bushel. A. E. Stickles. For anything in the line of farm im- plimentsandfertilizers, see E. W. Jones, of Smethport, first. Wanted, girl for general housework on a farm. Apply to John Hewitt, Keating township, or'phone 2f 13. Chas. Lemmler has a complete line of Trunks and Bags. Call and see him. Read the DEMOCRAT. ews fit to print. It prints the pers in the habit of extending credit would be justifipd as well as helpful in any county, to protect publishers fiom :he dead beats who subscribe for any and every paper they can get trusted to, with no intention of paying for them. Some move from place to place without notifying the publishers that are send- ing them papers to read, and if their address be discovered, a statement of account or an urgent appeal tor a set- tlement has no effect whatever. Again, _omc never move (though the dealers in their own town wish they would) and openly defy 'he publishers to collect subscriptions. The names of a few such, now or heretofore in Potter coun- ty, ought to be published in every news- paper in the county for the benefit of other publishers. -Coudersport Journal.   

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