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New Oxford Item Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1962 - Page 1

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   New Oxford Item (Newspaper) - July 19, 1962, New Oxford, Pennsylvania                                tartaUry Utt Artidu with am ITEM Wart A4. tart Irrlta Nrattf. (ffimitf t til tatty ara wd VOL. 85 NO. 11 NEW OXFORD, PA.f THURSDAY, JULY 19, 1962 Single Copy 5c LSCAt MtVi hJiittriml Developuieui i hduitry New will ttass in New Otford very saartiy, A made to the ITEM by Earl J. Bunk, president of the Industrial pevetopmeiit Corporation The firm will occupy the former Standard Garment bniMing m %rth Peters St. In the boroufh. The new industry will manu- facture ladies' sportswear and will employ as to Alterations to the tmiming struc- ture are prestntly beinf made and Bonald Sanders, Waynesboro, Pa.. who is in charge informed Klunk that he hopes production can be started very shortly. This marks the second industry to come to the New Oxford area. both secured through the efforts of the Industrial Development Corporation, organized through the Chamber of Commerce, since last September. The other is the toy manufacturing plant in the former Bair Cabinet building. Klunk mentions that the indus- try was induced to come to New Oxford through an employment survey made through the Indus- trial Development Corporation. concerning availability of labor in Uje area. %he firm will lease the building fof the present, it was told. Church Considers Buying Property Under a new plan of dissolu- tion, the Lutheran congregation of Paradise (Holtzschwamm) Union Church would purchase the United Church of Christ congregation's share of the property for Total equity of the building has been fixed at The plan would give the Luther- ans full ownership to the exist- ing church building and its fur- nishings and contents except per- sonal items belonging to the UCC congregation. The sale price would include the sexton's house, picnic pavilion and ball field. Ex- cluded are the cemetery and ground surrounding the old church .Under tbe proposal, the Luther- would make fjve payments, elch one-fifth of the total, when the sale agreement is signed, when the UCC breaks ground for a new church, when the new i corner stone is laid, when the new church is under roof, and tbe last payment when the UCC con- gregation leaves the present build- ing. If approved by both congrega- tions, an amout of rent would be established to be paid by the UCC to the Lutherans from the period of signing the agreement to actual dissolution. Congregational meetings will be set by the consistory and coum.Il .for some time in the early fall. Members of the union study committee discussing the plan are George M. Wehler, H. L. Stump, Glenn A. Myers, the Rev. Charles E. Strausbaugh, C. Curvin Baker. Jonas Gruver, Clair H. Forry and Rev. Carlton R. Howells. NEW OXFORD LOCAL ITEMS CaHMAtrM. Mr. and tin. Spencer Barber Harritburg, were recent visitor at the home of Mrs. Ward R. 1 A father and son covered dish social will be held this Saturday July U, at p.m. in the social rooms of the First Lutheran Church. Everyone is invited to Set Hearing Date 4 On Damage Action August 20 at 10 a.m. has been set by the Adams County court as the time for a hearing on a proposed settlement of a trespass action brought for Theresa M. Small by C. P. Keefer and Anna Mary Small against Stanley A. Starner. All are of the New Oxford The suit stems from an accident June 18. 1961, in New Oxford when Starner's car struck Miss Theresa M. Small, injuring her. The pro- posed settlement, for ac- cording to the papers filed by Attorney Gerald Walmer, would provide for the doctors, for the hospital, and for Anna Mary Small. The agreement also provides that Starner will pay all costs in the case. ftfAOING PROGRAM IS WILL ATTENOffD The Summer Reading Gub, sored by the PTA. has been attended during its first two weeks. Miss Nancy Budd and Miss Gayte Hersh have read stories to the children while A. L. Grasmick and Mrs. William Stock have been in charge of checking out books. A certificate will be awarded to those reading books during the month of July. Those attending the story hour are Linda and Susan Gras- mick. Susan Stock. Audrey Har- baugh, Sonya Duncan, Barbara Millar, Betty, Sandra and Lynn Kelky, Eddie Swope, Jeffrey Smith, David Mununert, David and Robin Edwards and HaroM Kline. The club will continue for three more weeks, July M and 17 and August 9. RITURN Jennie Marie D. Dubbt mm Miss Florence R. Moul. Han- A'PF, have returned from a New WM trtpv Best wishes to Fred E. Winand Qprby. pharmacist, formerly o new Oxford, who celebrated his birthday Friday. July 13. Mr. and Mrs. James Ford, New Oxford R. 2, and Mr. and Mrs Fred Snyder and son. Larry. Big lerville R. 2, returned recenUj from a trip to the west coast They visited relatives in Little Rock, Ark., and Chula Vista. Calif Mr. Ford returned home by plane after their visit in Arkansas am California. The Snyders and Mrs Ford also attended the World's Fair in Seattle. Wash., before re- turning home. Airman Third Class Bradley W Graft, New Oxford R. 1, is being reassigned to Vandenberg AFB Calif., following his graduation from the Air Force technica training course for electrician at Tinker AFB, Okla. Airman Groft studied electricity and its applications to Force utility power distribution systems, t graduate of San Rafael, Calif. High School, be entered the serv ice in January, 1962. His grand- mother, Mrs. Violet S. Higin- botham. resides at Lincolnway East, New Oxford. Danny Bross. son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bross Jr., accom- panied his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Altland, Hanover, on a trip to the Seattle World's Fair Mr. and Mrs. Thomas O'Brien and family. S. Peters St., spen Sunday with their daughter, Sister Alma, who is spending the sum mer at Divine Province Hospital Williamsport. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Slagle and sons, Hanover, were Sunday visitors with his parents, Mr. am Mrs. Harvey Slagle, New Oxford R. D. Mrs. John W. Herman, E. High St., accompanied Mr. and Mrs Clyde Spies, Hedgesville, W. va., and Mrs. Bessie Spies, York, on a vacation trip to Niagara Falls. The Usher's Club of the Im maculate Conception Church will meet Sunday at 2 p.m. in the school hall at which time reports and a discussion on the recent picnic will take place. John Shorb, seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Shorb, Hanover R. 3, while riding his bicycle in front of ;s home last Tuesday was struck by an auto driven by Blaine Wildasin of Ab- bottstown. The accident occurred when the brakes failed on the youth's bicycle. He suffered severe cuts about the face and scalp. Twenty-one stitches were required to close the wounds. He was discharged from the hospital Saturday. Cindy, Danny and Stanley Spies. Hedgesville, W. Va., spent a few days with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Shorb, Hanover R. 3 Mrs. L. E. Enterline, Ashland Pa., was a recent guest of Mrs. J. E. C. Miller, Lnicolnway West. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Schafer and family, Oberlin, 0., spent two weeks with Mrs. Schafer's par- ents. Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Griffin, New Oxford, and other relatives in this vicinity, Miss Catherine Miller, Wilming- ton, Del., daughter of Mrs. J. E C. Miller, Lincolnway West, left by plane from Philadelphia Satur- day for a two-week vacation in Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Chester Hoffman Hanover St., and Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hoffman, East Berlin, spent several days in Atlantic City. The Ladies' Auxiliary of the New Oxford Fire Company will hold their regular meeting this Thursday evening at S o'clock at the engine house. Miss Judy Ann Hoffman, daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. Chester Hoff- man, Hanover St., is attending the Hagerstown Medical Secretarial School, Hagerstown, Md. The annual picnic was enjoyed by the employes of the Alwine Brick Company and their families Saturday at the Adams County Fairgrounds. Dinner and supper were served by the Ladies' Auxil- iary of the Hampton Fire Com Miss Linda Sponseller, burg R. 5, spent week with her cousin. Miss Joam Hoffman, Han- over St. Glenn W. Millar Jr., Gettysburg R. 4, is stationed in Bamberg, Germany, as a radio operator. Following is his address: US 5IU7WS. Hq. TTp, 2nd Ream. 2nd APO New York, N. Y. Of N.O. Junior League new. Ml to riant: W. Waiter, Brad WoN, Twn Garter. Stevt Klunk, Stow Snktr, Tommy and Danny Sharrtr. Back rcw: W. WaNnr. munugur; Larry O'Brien. T Jehu Summers. Rich Walker. Den Stock, David O'Britn and Ernw Waato, mwuftr. M Walk- Clubbers Of N.O. Junior League Front row, left to right: Milw Staub, HaroM Ltbo, John Ltbo, Dan Diviwy, Bob Stawb and Barry Back row: Raymsnd Staub, manafer; Jack GrwnhoHz, Mich Divinty, Crafe Brewjmer and YORK SPRINGS NEWS NOTES Lt. Col. Ted Severr appeared on TV on July 2 when he accom- panied his wife and two other soloists on the piano when they sang selections which he had com- (osed. Mrs. Severn is the former Jeverly Starry, daughter of Bill Starry, of York Springs, and a ormer resident of York Springs. The Severns reside at Springfield, lass. Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Wonders spent the 4th of July weekend with their son-in-law and daugh- er, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Con- gleton, and family at Walde Lake, Mich. Mrs Parvin Bowers spent two weeks with her son, Maurice towers, and family at Milling- on, N. J. He accompanied ner tome Monday. Mr. and Mrs. John Meyers and wo children, of Lansing, Mich., isited the former's brother. Rev. Amos D. Meyers, and family. Donovan Meyers is spending the weekend with his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Amos D. Meyers. He is a counselor at Sertoma Camp at Linglestown, Pa. Paul L. Lenig, 20, son of Mrs Mary J. Lenig, R. 2. recently was tromoted to specialist four in forea where he is a member of he 7th Infantry Division. Lenig, who armed overseas in May 961. is a wireman in Company I of the (Tvision's 31st Infantry le entered the Army in June 960 and completed basic train- ng at Fort Riley. Kans He grad- lated from Bermudian Springs High School in 1960. Larry Rush, 7, R. 2, who ell from a moving tractor, was reated a' the Warner Hospital Friday for a deep laceration of he right knee. KINDIC-BACIHOAR RIUNION ON JULY The 25th annual reunion of the Kindig-Basehoar clan will be held t the Christ Church picnic grove near Littlestown on Sunday, July 2. The clan wilt assemble for a tasket lunch in the picnic pavilion it II noon. Following lunch the mnual historian's report will be (resented by Miss Edna Basehoar, The business session ill be conducted by the president, ra Geisehnan. All relatives and rienda of the Kindig-Basehoar amilies are invited and urged to ttend. Anthony's Shoe Sale now in progress. U Baltimore St., Han- ver. BANGES Shoe Sale in pro- W Yerk M., Hanover, Pa. Sixth Driver Slams Square Arthur J. Hoover, 18, Brod- becks, last Thursday evening at o'clock became the sixth driv- er in the last three months to smash into the square at New Ox- ford. State police said Hoover was driving north on Hanover St. in New Oxford, and his car crashed into one of the guard posts around the large plot in the square. The impact broke off that pole and the pressure pulled several other guard posts attached to the guard cable out of the ground. The car then smashed a con- crete bench in the square, ripped up a quantity of grass and came to rest against a tree. Damage was estimated at to Hoover's car and about to the square. There was no explanation of why motorists were able to make their way around tbe oval in New Oxford's square for many years without difficulty and in recent months such a large num- ber of drivers have smashed into the square. N.O. Social Club Slates Events At the July meeting of the New Oxford Social and Athletic Club held Monday evening announce- ment was made of various events to be held for members in the near future. On July 28 members and ladies will attend the races at Snenan- doah Downs. On August 1, it will be a trip to Baltimore for the Orioles-Minnesota baseball game. These trips will be made by chartered bus. The annual shrimp and crab feed for members only will be held August 14 starting -it A p.m. The annual picnic is sched- uled for the Adams County Fair- grounds. September 16. Diirins the session au- thorization was given to donate to the local Salvation Army unit; to the New Oxford Junior Baseball League. A dona- tion of was also given to the family of Roy W. Myers to enable their crippled son to attend a camp in the Poconos. PICNIC HtLO A family picnic for employes of McClann Plastics Inc. with two at New Oxford R. 1 and one in Abbotlstown, was held Saturday afternoon and evening, July 14 at the New Oxford Rod and Gun Club. There were M in attendance. A committee headed Donald and Nancy Wine and Willis Plank provided and refreshments for everyone. Music entertainment WHS furnished by CtmsrCrowlandhuMekKtyBeys. COMMITTEE PLANS FOR AWARDS COURT Leaders and Committee Women of Girl Scout Troop 766, New Ox ford, me( Monday night at the home of Mrs. Earl Zinn and made plans to hold the annual Court of Awards at Camp Happy Valley on August 12. Ceremonies will be held at 4 p.m. followed by a fami- ly supper and camp fire sing. All badge write-ups from this troop are due July 23 when a troop meeting will be held at the home of the leader, Mrs. Donald Sieg, at p.m. N.O. Carnival Plans All Set New Oxford firemen are busily engaged in getting their annual carnival plans set. The event oc- curs Friday and Satur- day. July 26, 27 and 28. The carnival celebrates the of the company 75 years ago and will be climaxed with a gigantic parade Saturday eve- ning starting at 6 p.m. Entertainment Thursday evening features Andy Reynolds and the 101 Ranch Boys. The Southland Playboys headline the program Friday evening. Besides there will be rides, eats and fun for all. Th event will serve as a home- coming for many former resi- dents. Senator D. Elmer Haw uiker will be the featured speaker Saturday evening following the vimoe. Leon Wald will serve as master of ceremonies. ABBOTTSTOWN FIREMEN OPEN CARNIVAL FRIDAY The annual Abbotlstown Fire men's carnival opens Friday eve- ning on the company grounds and in the fire hall. The Trojan Band wiil feature the entertainment Friday and on Saturday evening the New Oxford Itigh School Band will render a concert. Soup, sandwiches and platters will be sold each evening. There will be fun for old and young ram or shine OLD HOME PICNIC The annual Old Home Day pic nic will be held Saturday, August II, at "The Pines" Lutheran Church, near New Chester. Ham platters and hot chicken platters will be served starting at 4 p.m. Soup, sandwiches and refresh- ments will be on sale. The county commissioners last Wednesday authorized payment by the county of of the estimated damages to be caused by improvement of seven-tenths of a mile of road between Huntcrslown and Bowlder and construction of bridge ever Conewsje Creek. Three Teachers Resign; Three Are Elected By New Oxford School Board MM David Horst; Mrs. Smith and Paula Henry. Those elected unani- mously after being recommended by the teachers' committee re- ported by Bernard Anthony along with their salary include: Mrs. Eiker, Mrs. Je- anne Johnston. and William B. Swanger, The teachers' committee also recommended in- crease in salary to for the following: Shirley Hankey. Doro- thy Trostle, Gene Bowser and Ed- ward ReiUel. In discussing the teacher situ- ation, the directors were reminded by supervising principal Charles Hash that securing of competent and qualified teachers and keep- ing them is getting increasingly serious. He cited several cases where teachers had already agreed to come intr the local system but in the meantime learned of po- sitions with higher salaries. Teachers who are leaving" Hash reported, "all have been satisfied with teaching conditions at the school, but leave for more salary. Other nearby counties are giving more and so is the state of Mary- land." One director pointed out that taxpayers have discussed with him the increase in the teaching staff in number as well as in salaries. "One of these even told me that he could get all the teachers the school wants for a year." Directors agreed they would like to have this tax- payer bring those persons to the school. Starting salary for teachers with no previous teaching experi- ence recently was set at a year by the New Oxford board. Bids on several school items were opened. The first, for gen- eral school supplies such as pen- cils, tablets, paper, crayons, etc., was awarded to Roberts and Meek at their bid of The next closest bid in this category was that of Kurtz Bros. The other contract was for recapping bus tires and was awarded to H. A. Cranier, Inc.. Hanover for 49. The Huber Co. submitted a id of High School principal Scion bockey, in submitting his report on the school library, told the di- rectors he "was very pleased with .he circulation." During the year 'our encyclopedias were added making a total of 12 or 256 vol- umes. New books added amounted o 267; 26 new paper back science books added; a total of 92 books were rebound and 73 discarded. Total circulation for the year amounted to an average of 18 books per pupil which is very good, Dockey said. 46 periodicals reach the library every month along with five newspapers. The number of books in the library at present totals The school system athletic pro- ;ram received attention by the ward upon an inquiry by a di- rector as to why a baseball dia- mond had not been laid out on the school campus. Directors were assured that the athletic pro- gram in the school system will receive attention the same as oth- er matters. A baseball diamond (Continued on Page 6) N.O. Lions Name Committees At a meeting of the New Ox- ford Lions Club board of direc- tors Monday evening the various committees for the 1962-S3 year were appointed. Donald Kemp, president, was in charge. Following is the list of commit- tees, the first name listed desig nated as chairman: Garber, Earl Klunk: boys and girls work Merrill Yohe, Robert Donohue, George Allamong: citizenship and McClellan, E. W. Baldwin, Robert Donohue; civic improvement and community bet- Klunk, William Al- wine, James Quickel. William Stock. William Noel; C. P. Keefer, Selon Dockey: health and welfare-Wilbur Wentz, Wil- liam Rohrbaugh, Chester Nell; safety Henry Stock, Robert Sleighter. Rev. John Kugte; sight conservation and blind Earl Kaiser, Dr. Moses Baker. Dr. George Scaks, Fred Feiser; United Nations-Rev. Kugte, C. P. Keefer. Clyde Garber. Alwine, Dr. John Menges, Dr. Albert Gras- mickk. Ralph Duncan. William Al- wine Jr., Clair Rohrbaugh: at- Stover. Charles Slaybaugh, George Allamong: Duncan. James Robinson, H. A. Jones; finance- Philip Alwine. H. B. Flaherty, James Stock; Lions H. A. Jones. Earl Klunk. William Noel: Feiser, Clair Rohrbaugh, Hilly Rife: pro- gram and Edwards. Simon Altschull. Rich- ard Livingston; Sowers Jr.. Richard Higinbotham. The next regular meeting of the club will be held July 25 at p.m. in the Altland House, Abbottstown. ZINN'S COURT HAPFININGS The following informations were laid before Mrs. Elizabeth Zinn, Justice of the Peace of Berwick Twp.: Sanuicl D. Laughman, Han over R. 5. operating a motor ve- hicle witteut an operator's li- cense; Judith Reindollar, New Ox- ford R. I, operating a motor ve- hicle with an illegal muffler, and Charles B-.irgan, Clear Springs, Md., speeding. PAPlRS The will of George M Myers, late of York Springs, has been entered for probate. A daughter, Ethel E. SflRcr. is executrix of (he evatf. NOTICE Will be ckwed from July S3 to 29. DONOHUE'S JEWELRY Mew EAST BERLIN NEWS NOTES Modane Fans, R. 1, accom- panied by her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Chubb, Jr. Ab- wttstown, spent several days in Haneyville. Anita and Dona Lerew, daugh- ters of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lerew, Jacobs St., nave returned from a week's stay at Camp Echo Trails, Girl Scout camp, where their sis- ter, Paula, also spent two weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gentzler, Abbottstovvn St., and Mr. and Mrs. Ira W. King St., spent several days at the Ship- pensburg Area summer home of Mrs. Gentzler's brother, Kenneth Hale. Charles Hull, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Hull, York, former- ly of East Berlin, will appear in York Little Theatre's production of "Bye, Bye beginning July 24 at the Elmwood Theater. John R and Elizabeth J. Ridell, Mt. Pleasant Twp., have sold a property in Mt. Pleasant Twp., to Robert Clair and Nancy Louise Aldridge, East Berlin. Mrs. William C. Alwine Jr., New Oxford R. D., was a Friday of Eleanor and Mae Wolf, W. King St A dance for VFW members and qualified will be held Sat- urday from 10 p.m. till at the Post Horns. Music will be fur nished by The Novelaires. The Post will meet at p.m. July 26, followed by a meeting of the Home Association. A teen-age dance sponsored by the VFW and Auxiliary will be held at p.m. July 27. Mrs. Harvey Deardorff. York, was a weekend visitor of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Weigard, W. King St. David and Deborah Stoudt. E. King St.. are visiting relatives in Hellertown. Local firemen were called out about p.m. Wednesday when field at the western end of town was reported ablaze. The fire was controlled in about 20 minutes with no property damage. The Thomasville 4-H Clothing and Tasty Snacks met Monday evening, at the Holtzschwamm Fellowship Hall. The Kralltown Community Club met Monday evening at the home of George Lighty. East Berlin R. for a bee demonstration. The Davidsburg 4-H Clothing and Fun to Bake Club will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday at the home of Carolyn Heckcrt. Dover R. 5. Mrs Robert Lau, W. King St.. and Mrs. George Ruth. R. 1. were recent visitors of the Rev and Mrs. Snyder Alteman, Mari- etta. Teresa Snyder, W. King St. was a recent visitor of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Orner, Fairfield. Robert Eisenhart. Aspcrs, for mcrly of East Berlin, is a patient at the Lebanon Veterans' Hospi- tal. (Continued On Page ft) 20 4-H Club Members In State Contest The names of 20 Adams County 4-H members selected as the county winners in the im Na- tional award program wen nnounced by Associate County Agent Duane Duncan. Named as the county winners in he achievement award event were Dale Bair, Littlestown R. 2, and Marie Coble. David Lou, Gettysburg R. 4, was listed as the county winner in the agri- cultural award competition. Other winners and the classifi- cations in which they were chosen were: Martha Hikes, York Springs R. 2, beautificatkn of home grounds; Shirley Bair, Lit' lestown R. 2. beef; Mary Dorr, ettysburg R. l, clothing; David Slusser, Littlestown R. 2, dairy; Carol Rex, Biglervdle R. l, omology; Paul Middour. York Springs R. 2, field crops; Bar-' bara Johnson. Gettysburg R. 1, oods-nutrition; Carol Rex, Bigler- R. 1, garden; Martha Hikes, fork Springs R. 2, health: Mary Jane Bowman, McSherrystown, wme economics; Larry Bair, JtUestown R. 2, and Mary Jane Bowman, leadership; Dale Bair, recreation; Robert Spangler. Get- ysburg R. 4, tractor; Donald lair and Shirley Bair, Littles- own R. 2, citizenship; Shirley Bair. 4-H scholarship. The county winners are en- ered in a state competition and if they win they will compete against similar state winners in the national event. For each of the winners a five- >age form has been filled out isting his or her achievements. In addition each of the winners wrote essays of up 'o words describing work done in the spe- :ialty in which they competed. PICNIC ON SATURDAY Approximately 2.0M employes and their guests of the Gettys- burg Shoe Company, with plants in Gettysburg, Dillsburg and East Berlin, will hold their an- nual picnic at Grove Park on Saturday. Organised games for all ages will be held and the company will cater the Mrs. D. E. Hampton, Dies At 66 Mrs. Nellie Simpson Hartzdl, 66, widow of Daniel E. HartxelL died Tuesday night at o'clock at her home in Hampton. She had been in failing health ror eight years and bedfast the last four months. A native of Adams County, she was A daughter of the late Em- mert G. and Ellen (Baker) Simp- son and was a member of St. John's Lutheran Church, Hamp- ton, and the Hampton Fire Com- pany Auxiliary- Her husband died in 1957. Surviving are three children: Mrs. George R. Trimmer, New Oxford R. 2; Harold D. Harttell and Emmert E. Hartzell, both of Hampton; seven grandchildren and a sister, Mrs. Bessie Feeser, Aspers.. Funeral services Friday morn- ing at 10 o'clock at the Fred F. Feiser Funeral Home, New Ox- ford, with the Rev. Wilbur M. Allison, Gettysburg, and the Rev. J. Harold Little, Hanover, a for- mer pastor, officiating. Inter- ment in the Hampton Union Cemetery. Friends may call this evening after 7 o'clock at the funeral home. Begin Instrumental Music Programs The summer instrumental pro- gram of the Bermudian Springs School began Monday in York Springs Elementary School and Tuesday in East Berlin Elemen- tary School. Bermudian Springs High School Senior Band will practice at p.m. Wednesday at Bermudian Springs High School, it was an- nounced by the band director, Gary Crum. CONIWAGO PICNIC THIS SATURDAY The great Conewago picnic, which annually held the third Saturday in July, will be held ia the Conewago Chapel picnic grove, near Centennial Saturday, la case of rain the picnic will be held in the Conewago Chapel Hall. The usual good fried chicken or ham dinners will be aerved ing at 4 p m., and continuing un- til all are served. Adults, SI.V; children, cents. Sandwiches, soup, refreshments will alse be on sate. The local draft beard reports that it has HIM its August se- lective Service call with three volunteers. The call to fer Au- gust C. There has been M call for physical cxaminatiM. SUMMER MlB Herts Fri- day. TRONE 4 WEUCPtT, let Jajwrt, Mettvar, IV NEWSPAPER!   

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