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New Oxford Item Newspaper Archive: May 17, 1962 - Page 1

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   New Oxford Item (Newspaper) - May 17, 1962, New Oxford, Pennsylvania                                MltttkrM.it ITBM Wart Item iuut Ifrlitt fflimtrt Iyflaf tUaft wt whsa VOL. 85 NO. 2 NEW OXFORD, PA., THURSDAY, MAY Industrial Exhibit Well Attended; Gets Prtke Write M accurate BMdeef the twelfth annual iadustrial Mbrt held at New Oxford Junior- SMior High School during May Day festivities last Thursday, is no exaggeration in the state- ment mat the exhibit attracted persons than in any previous In fact, the more than N9 ftojects were kept on display Fri- day evening so that those attend- ing the PTA variety show could view them. Everyone was loud in their praise of the work accomplished by the students and their teachers. The projects were on display in the lobby and main corridors of the school. The lobby, particu- larly, made an exceptional and attractive setting for many of the larger projects such as beds, desks, dressers, chests, gun cabi- nets and various types of tables, as well as numerous displays of 'metal work including foundry, forging, sheet metal, art metal, spinning and machine shop proj- ects. Prizes were awarded to the fol- lowing boys: Seventh Grade wood- work first. Mike Haugh. bird feeder; second. Larry Kline, bat .rack, and third. Gary Benson, wall Seventh Grade metahrork Earl King, brass candelabra; Harvey Emig. kidney bowl, and third, Kenneth Wolf, ivy bracket. Eighth Grade wood first, Gary Landis. wall desk; second, Dennis Alwine, book case, and third, Charles Mil- ler, coffee table. Eighth Grade metal first. Scott Hafer, roast- ing fork; second. Dwight Adams, book rack, and third, Kenneth Wicldine, handTaised aluminum bowl. Ninth Grade wood first, Edward Klunk. book case; second. James Kemp, trundle chest, and third, James Walker, round table. Ninth Grade metal first, Gene Reynolds, aluminum tray; second. Jack Dettinger, copper dish, and third, Max Hamm, chisel. Tenth NEW OXFORD LOCAL ITEMS first, Eugene second. Nelson Grade wood Baughar, Milter, gun cabinet, and third, Robert Myers, bed. Tenth Grade metal first, Nelson MiNer, eandleholders; second, Wayne copper mugs, and third, ._____CosteHa, roasting fork. Senior High elective wood first, Lester Miller, desk; second, Har- old Brown, desk, and third, Ron- ald Knott, dresser. Senior High elective metal first. Ken Rutter, hand-raised brass bowl; second, Harold Brown, same, and third, Eugene Baugher, same. Judges for the exhfcit were Hen- ty Kauffman. MiUersvHle State College, and Clyde Cover, Bigler- viHe High School. The teachers in the Industrial Arts department are Levere Breighner and Edward Borden. CaHMAtTMl. Clyde W. Stambaugh re- cently returned from duty over- foltowinc address: AF llta A C Supp. Soda.. Box MM. Atlus AFB, Okla. Mrs. Sarah Estep, chairman of the annual Salvation Army drive, has announced the follow ing captains and solicitors for New Oxford and vicinity: Cap- tains. Mrs. Henry Hersh, Mrs. Clarence Noel, Mrs. Ray 0. Peters Mrs. Richard Brendle and Mrs. George Deitrick. Solicitors, Rosina Fewer, Linda Harbaugh, Susan Harbaugh, Sandra Duttera. Pam- ela Sebright. Sara Zeigter, Becky Brendle. Carol Hoffman. Donald Peters, Robert Peters. Linda Dear- dorff. Betsy Brendle. Barbara Kessel, Barbara Deardorff, Rife, Gayle Hersh. Russel Sager, Nevin WenU. Bonka Cristofaro, Mrs. Dorothy Cristofaro and Sally Black. Graduation will take place at the Immaculate Conception School, June 3, at 3 p.m. Donald Poist, who is employed by Paul Wagner, Inc.. is attend- ing school in New York this week. Mr. Wagner spent Monday in New York.. Frances J. Sneeringer, Pitts- Durgh, and Mr. and Mrs. Leo Sneeringer, Washington, D.C., spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. Clarence .Sneeringer, Bon- neauville. Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Thomas and daughter. Jody, Toledo, Ohio, are spending sometime with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bevenour, North Peters St. Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Roy Harman, R. 1, who will cele- brate their 46th wedding anniver- sary May 11. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Ecker and family, Orange St., spent Moth- er's Day with Mr. and Mrs. Cal- vin Taylor, Arendtsville. Mrs. Terrence Ecker and in- fant son, Christopher Wayne, were discharged from the Hanover Hos- pital. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Ecker. are the paternal grandparents of the infant. Mr. and Mrs. Leo Ecker, Orange St., entertained the following at a "500" card party on Saturday eve- ning: Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eck- er and Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Becker. Hanover, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore. New Oxford. Recent visitors of Mrs. Emma Fair and Mr. and Mrs. John L. Griest, R. 1, were Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fan1, Mr. and Mrs. Freed, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Klingel Jr. Single Copy 5e LOCAL BtfBl BAtBl ORDINANCE ON BUILDING PERMITS FOR NEW OXFORD The ordinance regulating build- Area Survey On Livestock To Start Saturday Distribution of the 1982 Live- ctock Survey cards by rural maB carriers to patrons on their routes will begin about May 19, New Ox- ford Postmaster Goktie M. Bower announced today. The cards wffl Jbe placed fat the mail boxes of a cample of farmers served by the local post office. The livestock survey is one of two which the Post Office and Agriculture Departments coopera- tively conduct each year. The other one ptace in Novem- ber. 33 Take First Communion In N.O. Catholic The following children of the Immaculate Conception Church, New Oxford, made their First Holy Communion on Sunday at the 9 o'clock Mass: Jerome Glass, Warren Klunk. Emmert Hartzell, Daniel Hopper, Timothy Lawrence. Matthew Ma- hone, Marlin Miller, Philip Moore, Thomas Moore, Dale Myers. Ar- thur Noel, Daniel Poist, David Poist. Kenneth Smith. Linus Smith, Janet Arnold, Lisa Beard, Loretta Becker, Angela Becker, Karen Berkheimer, Clare Geb- hart, Mary Goff, Helen Graft, Rosalie Graft, Patricia Lawrence, Nancy Long, Katherine Meeder. Donna Miller, Jean Myers, Jam Rabine, Roberta Shrader, Linda Shrader and Victoria Weaver. The May crowning took place in the afternoon at 3 o'clock at which time Helen Graft crowned the Blessed Mother. The crown bearer was Marlin Miller and the attendants were Arthur Noel, Dan- iel Poist, Janet Arnold', Angela May Day at New Oxford Nigh School was observed tot Thursday _.twiMM the school campus. Th. May Quern, Sandy Gruvtr, and her court an shown above Mt to rifht: Judy Hoffman, Joyct Wai' Ion, Brinton, all attendants; tht quton. Sandy Gruvtr; Bon- itio Mummtrt, ShuMi and Betty attendants. In front, seated: WoHo, flower girl; Jay Forttwy, crown and Lori flmwr firl. (Edmunds Studio photo) New Oxford High Queen Crowned At Festivities and children Klingel and and Mrs. Pauline daughter, Linda, Annual May Day exercises for New Oxford Junior-Senior High School were held on the school campus last Thursday afternoon. The festivities were attended by hundreds of parents and students. May Queen was Sandy Gruver and her court, Bonnie Mummert, maid of honor; Margo Brinton, Brenda Shultz, Betty Swope and Joyce Wallen, attendants; Star- lette Wolfe and Lori Sheeley, flower girls, and Jay Fortney, crown bearer. Following the pro- cession, the makl of honor crowned the queen. Participating in the Maypole dance to "English Country Garden" were Marlene Spicer, Linda Harbaugh, Ann Wentz, Christine Alwine, Barbara Deardorff, Alan Meckley, Ashley Varner. Staffin Hamme, David The June livestock survey serves as the basis for estimating the number of livestock on farms; livestock production; the size of pig, calf and lamb number of chickens this year's crops; the raised; and the number of milk cows on farms. Reports from Pennsylvania fanners also wffl be included in the national livestock inventory to be issued by the Statistical Reporting Service of USDA. The survey information is useful to fanners, the livestock industry, industries serving agri- culture, public agencies and the general public. To assure accurate and reliable forecasts and to make certain that v well represented. Bower urges each York; Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Krall and Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Harlach- er, Kralltown. The New Oxford Garden Club will hold their monthly meeting Tuesday evening at the home of Mrs. Mervin Spangler, Lincoln- way East. Mrs. George Seaks will be the oohostess. John Robinson, Lincolnway East, Extd., will celebrate his birthday May 21. On May 25 he and his wife, the former Pauline Miller, will observe their 27th wedding anniversary. They are the parents of four children, all of whom are living Raymond Slagle, Hanover, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Slagle, New Oxford R. D., was admitted to Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti more, for observation. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Robinson and children, York, were Sunday visitors at the home of Mr and Mrs. John Sherman and family, W. High St. The following members of Heid- leraburg 4-H Teenettes attended the officers' leadership training meeting Friday evening at the courthouse in Gettysburg: Ilene ers. The following eighth graders of the Immaculate Conception School were received into the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin Mary: Merle Bevenour, William Bol- linger, Larry Klunk, Dennis Moore, Lynn Overbaugh, Donald Robinson, Jay Robinson, John Smith, Michael Smith, Ronald Staub, Richard Wagner, Dorothy Becker, Gayle Breighner, Patricia Breiner, Paulette Gebhart, Rita Kijek, Jane Kuhn, Helena Law- rence, Margaret Miller, Yvonne Orndorff, Donna Overbaugh, Lin- da Rabine, Patricia Robinson, Su- san Sieg, Donna Smith, Jane Sponseller, Pamela Staub and Linda Wolf. Livingston and Raymond Deitz. Participants in square dancing included Barbara Deardorff, Marlene Spicer, Linda Harbaugh, Ann WenU, Ashley Varner, Staffin Hamme, David Livingston, Raymond Deitz, Barbara Anthony, Becky Landis, Jane Weikert, Cande Snedden, James Myers, Larry Myers, William Dubbs, Larry Wolf, Becky Bankert, Gayle Hersh, Sue Warnick, Virginia Rudisill, Richard Higinbotham, Richard Boose, Robert Brown and Richard Brinton. The il-l boys did special tum- bling acts. On display in the high school lobby and in several of the halls were exhibits comprising the annual industrial arts exhibit. United Telephone To Replace Letters In Phone Numbers Numerals will begin to replace locality Postmaster patron receiving a livestock card to complete and return it to the carrier as soon as possible. Rural carriers participating hi this co- operation survey are L. E. Sheery on Route 1 and J. Route 2. R. Harm on fOM. INMOMT The Cwrnty Cancer Cru- aade whkh is now in sight of Ma goal has reached a total of more than Only two ta the county have made no re- port to date. Most borough" and have completed their campaigns and some are'inekinf find caHs hi their Kennedy, Sherry Adams, Elaine Kemper, Diane Fennel, Kathy VoHand, Judy Smith and Linda Smith. The next regular meeting of the club will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of Mfa Kathy Volland. Mrs. Marian M. MMnimes, New Oxford R. t, third grade teacher at the Meade building, Gettys- burg, and Robert E. Steads ST., formerly of New Oxford, biology and general science teacher at the Gettysburg High School, are ending their teaching careers with (lie end ot the current year. Mrs. J. Francis Jr. past president of the PTA, was a leader at a school of instruction conduct- ed May I at Fairf ieM High School in connection with the session of Adams County Council of PTA groups. Mm. Yafce's subject deaU with "Budget, Finance and Ways and Means." (Continued on Page 10) ANY SEASON Any day. com- fortable shoes need not be thrown EAST BERLIN NEWS NOTES Walter H. Partymiller and wife have sold a property in Washing- ton Twp., to Roger H. DeCourcy and wife. Carl Joe Rhodes, Hanover R. 1, and Catherine Charmaine Henry, East Berlin R. 2, have filed appli- cation for a marriage license in York. Mrs. Floyd Hoffman, Water St.. addressed the recent Mother- Daughter banquet of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Hanover. Mr. and Mrs. Clair Mummert, son, David, and daughter Diane, New Oxford, were Sunday visi- tors of Mrs. Mumnwrt's parents; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cootey, W. King St. During the evening worship service Sunday at Morning Hour Chapel, the following children were dedicated: Sandra. Rickey and Connie Trimmer, children of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Trimmer, East Berlin R. D., and Barbara Engle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nevin Engle. Grantham. Bishop Charles Byers, Mechanicsburg, officiated. Mrs. Robert Myers. W. King St., who had returned home from the York Hospital, was re-admit- ted to the hospital last week. She was conveyed there in the East Berlin ambulance. She is reported to be improving. The local ambu- lance also conveyed Mm. Mary Haue, Thursday from the Range's Convalescent Home to the home of her daughter. Gladys Cummins, Conewago Park. The Women's Circle of the Morning Hour Chape) will meet at p.m. Thursday at the home of Mrs. Eugene Leromon, East Berlin R. 1 letters in New Oxford telephone numbers, according to United Telephone Company District Man- ager Scott Smith, who announced a program for the gradual transi- tion from two-letter, five-digit telephone numbers to all numeral (7-digit) numbers. Under the new system the two- letter prefixes will be translated to their numerical equivalent on the dial, for instance MA will be- come 62. The ITEM office MAdi- son 4-7141, for example, will ulti- mately become 624-7141. Initially the all-numeral tele- phone numbers will be used on subscribers toll statements and they will be assigned to new con- nections and installations requir- ing service changes, Some telephone exchanges such all as Littlestown already have i numeral telephone numbers. "In a few years all number listings will be standard across the coun- Smith predicted. As MAdison passes from the local scene so will such exchange names frequently misdialed as MU for Mercury and LI for Ly- ceum. A desirable feature of the new numbering arrangement is that you don't have to spell a name to use it. Growth of ihe telephone business is dictating the change to all-nu- meral calling, according to Man- ager Smith, who pointed out that substitution of numerals for the two-letter prefixes will increase the number of exchange cod- com binatkHis from m to WO. Tele phone engineers predict these added combinations will be sorely needed in the not too distant fu ture, if the present rate of tele phone communication expansion continues. The nation's telephones have practically tripled since Kre end of World War II. increasing From to nearly 80 mil Racing To Start At Lincoln Sat The 10th season of jalopy stock ar racing will get under way Sat- rday, May 19, at 8 p.m. at Lin- coln Speedway, the half-mile dirt val located just south of Rt. 30, he Lincoln Highway, midway be- ween Rts. 116 and 94. The Pigeon Hills track will pre- sent combination shows each Sat urday of the '62 campaign. The egular weekly fare again will consist of two 20-lap heats and a 25-lap feature for both the'sports- man-modifieds and limited sports- men. Johnny Mackinson (1) is the defending S-M champion. The Delta Dart rang up 17 feature vic- ories last year. At one stretch he ook seven in a row. Paul Keller copped Lincoln's 1961 Novie Division crown. The novice boys are now listed as imited sportsmen because of an easing of the rules which permits more powerful engines. OTHER DRIVERS Other top drivers due to battle or the S-M honors are Pee Wee Pobletts. Neil Haight, Bobby Hersh, Mfte Harden. Bobby Abel, Ray Kable, Pete Kantorsky. Gene WHITE SAND For sand boxet, Sakrete, plaster mix, pent charcoal briquettes. We Mr. son, and Mrs. Barry. Slanten DeBoH and daughter, Patricia, Carlisle, were Sunday visitors of Mm, John Myers and away Let us repair them atldellver. PEOPLES COAL CO.. Mary Myers, AbbotUtown PAUB'S SHOE REPAIR, OR Uwlnigh anoM Hanover MEIroselSt. IN MSK TRAINING Joseph F. Carroll, son of Mr and Mrs. Edmund T. Carroll, Ab bottstown R. 1, began nine weeks of bask training, April 9, as a seaman recruit at the Nava Training Center, Great Lakes Dtring the training he will re ceivc instructions in military eti queue, drill, phywcal filncw swimming and survival, first aid shipboard safety precautions and security chity. Throughout he re ceives specialized counseling which assists him in selecting rating in which to work from more thN W job Bermudian Bd. Elect Trio Of New Teachers Three new teachers were elected, two others resigned and plans were announced for the Bermudian Springs High School commencement at the May meet- ing of the Bermudian Springs Joint School Board Monday eve- ning at the high school building near York Springs. The graduation exercises will be held Sunday, May 27, with Dr. Gilbert McLveen, head of the de- partment of education at Lebanon Valley College, as the speaker. There are 73 members of the senior class. Resignations were accepted from Miss Mary G. Malone, art teacher, and Mrs. Jean Lobaugh, Third Grade teacher at York Springs. The three teachers who were elected are: Samuel Ebersole, East Berlin R. graduate of Shippensburg State College with some teaching experience, to teach driver education and social studies at a salary of Miss Delaine Snelbaker, Mechanics- burg, who will graduate from Al- bright College this year, to teach home economics at and Miss Barbara Curley, Coraopolis, Thiel graduate and now a teacher at McKees Rocks, to teach the Third Grade at York Springs for The supervising principal, Amos D Meyers, said the district needs an art teacher and one more elementary teacher to complete its staff for September. ing, excavating and demolition within the borough limits of New Oxford, which was passed unani- mously at council's May session, brings the community up-to-date on this phase of borough govern- ment. The ordinance, more fa- miliarly called a building permit ordinance, will replace one of king standing that calkd for the small fee of 50 cents, no matter what the cost of construction. This new ordinance should bring some additional revenue into the treasury and is one that has long been overlooked by previous coun- ciimen. New fees start at the min- imum of for construction up to the cost of It provides for an additional charge at the rate of for each additional construction cost or fraction thereof. Here is how the system of fees will work: If the estimated cost of construction you are plan- ning, for example, amounts to the permit fee would be You arrive at this figure in this way; initial fee for the first then for each additional or fraction thereof; there is left which for purposes of the permit gives you the figure 10 at each or total of The ordinance is not applicable where the construction costs are or less. Specific regulations in the or- dinance state that no construction excavation or demolition may be done within the borough limits Worley Wins In New Oxford While veteran assemblyman Francis Worley went down to de- feat in Tuesday's primary, New Oxford Republicans voted for him, though giving him just a slight margin of five votes, The vote wan 61 to 63. The complete vote for New Oxford follows: IIIPUtLICAN Governor: William W. Scranton 96; J. Collins McSparran 41. Lt. Governor: Raymond P. Shaf- 115. U.S. Senator: James E. Van- sandt. Secretary of Internal Affairs: Audrey R. Kelly 116. Assemblyman: Francis Worley 68; Harry Ridinger 63. Member State Committee: Fred G. Pfeffer 80; Fred Ebersole 45. CommKteemen: Muriel Brendle 104; C. J. Rickrode 97; John Stock M. DEMOCRATIC Governor: Dilworth 107; Chas. Schmitt 19; Harvey Johnston 16. Lt. Governor: Stephen McCann 137. Secretary of Internal Affairs: Genevieve Blatt 135. U.S. Senator: Joe. S. Clark 138. Congressman: Earl Warner 90; Jane Alexander 29; Kern Smith 24. Assemblyman: Eugene Hartman The board adopted finally the school budget for the 1962-63 school year which had been given tentative approval a month ago. The budget is an increase of about over that for the current year but the supervising principal told the board per pupil costs in the Berrmidian Springs district are below national and state averages. The per pupil cost in Bermudian Springs district in the school year 1960-61 was while the state average for the same year was and the na- tional average was The board authorized a payment to the general contractor on the high school building, Reis- inger Brothers. A sum had been (Continued On Page 8) without a permit. This includes the setting of poles and signs; trimming of trees outride the build ing line and the repair or removal of a building. Application for the permit, ac- cording to the ordinance, must be made in writing to the mayor or to the borough secretary, and if acceptable, me required fee must be paid in full before the permit is issued. The permit itself, r- quirs that the applicant take all necessary precautions for the safe- ty of pedestrians and vehicular traffic and that barricades with lights be erected at nightfall, if necessary. A regulation in the ordinance provides that, after completion of the construction, the mayor or borough secretary may demand the applicant to furnish an ac- curate compilation of the costs, and the fees can be adjusted to conform to the actual cost, in which case they may either be rebated or increased by the mayor or secretary. It should be noted also that vio- lation of the ordinance carries a penalty of a fine of or jail sentence of 15 days, or both. Borough property owners should take note of these new regulations. N.O. Girl Scouts Hold Campout A recent campout for New Ox- ford Girl Scouts at Happy Valley Girl Scout Camp, near Fairfteld, was arranged by troop leaders, 139. Member State Committee: R. L. Pittenturf 135. Committeemen: Fred G. Klunk; Emory Hammer 127; Charles Graft Jr. 119. Committeewoman: Anna Laura Slaybaugh 135. doodling, Findley. Dizzy Dean and Jim The limited sportsmen can count on Keller, Don Eisenhour. Charley Wierman, Rich Christine and Johnny Laughman to create con- siderable excitement. But the stodters have tost one of their aces Willie Mussclman, of Han- over to the speedier modified competition. Willie's new mount is No. 76. NASCAR-sanctkmed late-model races of 100 laps are listed for Lincoln June 30, July 28 and Sep- tember 8. URC sprint cars will be on hand at the Hills track on June 16 and August 4. The Langhorne Qualifier for modifieds goes Sep- tember 8, a night on which the late models and S-M boys will share the spotlight. SUV To Decorate Area Cemeteries Theodore Phieffer Camp No. 60, Sons of Union Veterans, New Ox- ford, will again place flags on veterans graves and hold me- morial services at the following cemeteries during the Memorial Day weekend: Paradise and McShei rystown, May 27: Hampton, May 29. Cone- wago, Bonneaiivillc, St. Luke's. Salem, Abbottstown. Mummcrt's Meeting House and New Oxford, May 30; New Chester and "the June 2. Approximately 450 flags will be placed on graves of war veterans in the above ceme- teries including Round Hill. SCIKS DtVOftCI Barbara Annie (Kauffman) Sul- livan, York Springs R. 1, is seek- ing a divorce from Richard Merlin Sullivan, McKnigbtstown, accord- ing to papers filed in the prothono- tary's office for Mrs. Sullivan by Attorney Daniel E. Teeter. Indig- nities are charged. The couple wed at Shiretnanstown in 1963. Elmer Smith, 17 W. High St., wins a Wembly tic, and Adolphus Walker Jr.. New Oxford R. 2, wins a Cricket tie NOEL'S MEN'S SHOP. Must be picked up tot Monday. Mrs. Janet Miller and Mrs. Glenn Almoney. so that the girls could complete work entitling them to the campcrafts badge. Scouts participating were Polly Berkheimer, Roberta Breiner, Rosa Carbaugh, Cindy Holtry, Mary Ellen Hockensmith, June A. Miller, Debbie Miller, Gloria Mil- ler. Patsy Bellinger, Vickie Kline, Linda Rohrbaugh. Pamela Se- bright. Roxanne Sieg. June Yeagy. Peggy A. Kijek, Susan Almoney, Stella Boose, Monica Breiner, Carol Deatrick, Barbara Doyle, Beverly Hartman, Karen Mohane, Barbara Millar, Kathy Miller, Doris R. Myers, Brenda Phiel, Sharon Shultz, Victoria Staub, Virginia Staub and Sharon White. Also in the party were adult advisors. Mrs. William Millar, Mrs. Virginia Phiel, Mrs. Daniel Boose and Carolyn Sebright and members of the local senior Girl Scout troop, Carol Bollinger, Mary Sue Gebhart, Janet Williams. Sally Wolfe and Sandra Duttera. These girls acted as aides to the adult leaders. In the campout as guests of participants were Lynn Millar, Doris Baker and Becky Bankert. Variety Show Huge Success The Variety Show program, sponsored by the Lower Adams PTA, Friday evening in ttie New Oxford High School auditorium was a huge success and enjoyed by a large number of persons. Various musical and comedy skits were presented by different groups. A group Iron) AbbptUtown pre- sented an old-fashioned school board meeting. Those taking part were Rev. Lester J. Bernard Anthony, Mr. Bennett, Arthur Diehl and Faber Widasin. The elementary and high school teachers presented a comedy bal- let with Mrs. Kathryn Donobue the instructor. Taking part were Robert. Satterfield, Mary Rudisffl, Gene Bowser, Mrs. Vivian Hamm, Mrs. Dorothy Trostle, Ronald Stoner, Rush Canause. Ed Retael and Robert Bellis. Several numbers were played by a kitchen band composed of the following members of St. Paul's United Church of Christ Women's Guild: Gladys Hoffman, Betty Hammer. Cristie Miller. Pat Staub, Annie Sponseller. June Martin. Dorothy Swisher. Lois Betty Neiman, Mary Dut- tera, Janet Allamong, LoueHa Breighner. Doris Jean Stock, Dor- othy Wolf, Viola Eckert, Jam Grasmick and Mary Ann Menges. The following quartet from New Chester rendered several selec- tions: Mrs. Harry Biesecker, Mrs. William Little. Mrs. Robert Kline and Mrs. Ruth Sttwrt. A dance number was presented by Kathy Menges and Sally Wolf. Jane Grasmick and Woody Miller sang a duet and several selections were played by the dance band. A pantomime to a number from Homer and Jethro was rendered by Mrs. Ruth Millar and Miss Judy Garrett. The area chorus, under the di- rection Of Mrs. Edgar Moul, and Files Damage Suit In X-Keys Crash An action in trespass has been filed in the prothonotary's office here by Atty. Donald G. Oylcr for Charles C. Garrctt Jr., Hanover, against John Francis Gosncll, Crawfordsvillc, Ind. The suit stems from an mtto accident August 26, 1961. at Cross Keys. According to the complaint, Gosnrll was driving cast on the Lincoln Highway while Garrctt's car was being towed west. The car towing Garrctt's auto made a left turn into Route 94 and the Gosncll car struck the Garrctt vehicle driving it into a car operated by Kenneth KlincdinM, New Oxford R. I, Uarrett seeks, damagtt totaling NEWS NOTES Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Congteton, Saginaw, Mich., announced the birth of their first daugh- ter, Debra Sue, on May 5. They have four sons. Mrs. Con- glcton is the former Dorothy Wcigle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Grayson Weigte. Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Leer, Free- hold N. J., announced the birth of a daughter. Wendy Ann. on April 30. This is their third daughter. Mrs. Leer is the for- mer Shirley Kaiser. Both were former residents of York Mrs. Mabel Leer returned home Friday after spending two weeks with her son, Ivan Leer, and family, at Freehold. N.J. Blainc Bramer and Arlie MOT- rcll were recent Sunday dinner of Mr. and Mrs. Jem Dal? accompanied by 'Mrs. Nancy Gable Aldridge at the piano, sang sev- eral numbers. The chorus was composed of the following: Lois Sheely, Lois Baugher, Betty Hoff. Mary Duttera, Joan Dockey. Mrs. James Stock, Mrs. Nelson Miller. Mrs. Mary Rudisill, Mrs. Rich- ard Hamme, Mrs. George Griffin, 'Mrs. Kelly, Mrs. John Martin, Mrs. Donald Gardner, Mrs. El- wood Miller. Mrs. John Menges. Mrs. Robert Satterfield, Janet rougher. Mrs. John Kuglt. Mrs. A. L. Grasmick. Mrs. Don- ald Kemp. Mrs. Helen Rodgera, Robert Satterfield, Gene Bowser, Larry Gable, Elwood Miller. aid Orndorff. Fred Gable, Rich- ard Hoffnagte, Clan- Mummert. William Stock, Fred Howe, Raosf Wildasin. Arthur Diehl, Rev. Les- ter Karscnoer, NeUwn Miller and Ed Moul. The program closed with a "shit along." M. E. Miller WM MM master of ceremonies. art family Yoik R. 4. .NFWSPAPFRf TOATTINOOAMt On June 39, members af New Oxford Social and Athletto Club will journey by bus to tht baseball game between Orioles and New York Yankm at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. caH for the bus to leave chjbfaouM at pm JEWS PA PER I   

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