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New Castle News: Wednesday, September 14, 1938 - Page 1

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   New Castle News (Newspaper) - September 14, 1938, New Castle, Pennsylvania                                NEWS PHONES 4000 Telephone Your News [terns To Thf CM 4000. NEW CASTLE NEWS WEATHER Showers Tonight and Probably To- morrow; Cooler Thursday. FIFTY-EIGHTH 264 NEW CASTLE, PA., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1938. PAGES THREE CENTS A COPY CZECHS ADD DORDER TROOPS t. t _k Firm Against Sudeten Demands, But Hopeful Of Peace Georgia Voters Deciding Issue In Purge Effort Primary Election To Deter- mine Outcome Of Senator George's Battle DEFEAT IS URGED BY NEW DEALERS Forecasts Indicate Another Defeat For Roosevelt In Purge Campaign By GEORGE R. HOLMES News Service Staff Correspondent WASHINGTON, Sept. ident Roosevelt's adopted state of Georgia provides another test today ot his ability to eliminate from con- gress those recalcitrant Democrats lia-ve bucked the New Deal. In Mr. Roosevelt's own words, Senator Walter P. George is "a gen- tleman and a scholar." But. also in Mr. Roosevelt's own words, "We don't speak the same language, for, in my judgment, he (George) can not possibly be classified as belong- ing to the liberal school of thought." Marked -For Defeat By New Deal Therefore. Senator George was marked for defeat in Georgia's three-cornered primary administration forces can accomp- lish it. There is serious doubt they can In fact, capital politicos in both parties will be surprised if George doesn't win out, either in today's balloting, or in a run-off primary that may follow. His opponents are Lawrence S. On Btx) ___BUS IN NEW CASTLE----- France Will Refuse To Urge Plebiscite By KENNETH T, DOWNS International New? Service Sports Editor PARIS, Sept. has reached the end of her compromis- ing tactics on the Sudeten crisis and will refuse to urge the Prague government to grant the Henleinists a plebiscite on the question of their "anschluss" with Germany. This became increasingly clear to- day as the fuse of Europe's powder keg sputtered ominously and Prance tense but calm, prepared for passible war. Paris probably would be al- most completely evacuated during the first 24 hours of a conflict, should one break out. Enormous amounts of sand are being brought to principal quarters of the city for distribution on roofs and in cellars for fire-fighting pur- poses in the event of air raids. In addition, there are press reports that the German embassy here has j advised all German nationals in Paris to return ho.me. Only two Rightist papers have suggested that a Sudeten plebiscite (Continued On Two) British Government Appeals To Henlein PA NEWC OBSERVES Complaints are made by residents in the vicinity of the intersection of Shenango street and Lincoln avenue, that it is being made a dumping ground for all kinds of rubbish. The city authorities have posted "no dumping" notices several times, but they have been torn down and the dumping continues. A number of citizens have organ- ized themselves into a vigilance with the object in view apprehending those Tvho are responsible for existing conditions. 'With school now well under way, mother is back In the old routine of seeing that the young hopefuls nre up early, have their breakfasts, their necks "washed, and are off in lime for school. It seems a little queer at first, no: having them around; also unusual to have the house remain tidied up and clean nil day Nerves are less frayed as teacher lifts the responsibility from mothers shoulders. Opening of school doesn't-affect Dad much, as he has it easy all the time. 3j: It's odd how folks complain of the heat during the day, and then find fault with the evenings when they get, chilly sitting on the front porch, IT; seems the weather man just can't please all the people all the time. Somebody always wants it dry when it rains, and rain when it's dry. Pa Newc has found that there's only one way to keep on good terms with the weatrier man, and that's to ac- cept what he sends and be glad it's Pa Newc was met at the door of a farmhouse the other day by a woman with her sleeves rolled up a nd a big butcher-knife in her hand. His first impulse was to run, but she quickly re-assured him all was "I'm cutting down corn" she said, and to prove it led him to the kitchen wftere he found a big dishpan full of innocent looking and a stack of nude cobs. nothing better than home (Continued On PafTO Two) ------BUI' IX NE1V CASTLE------ By KINGSBURY SMITH International Ncwa Service Staff Correspondent LONDON, Sept. urgent. almost frantic, appeal to Sudeten leader Konrad Henlein to retreat from his defiant attitude and thus save the world from war was dis- patched by the British government today, The virtually unprec e d e n t e d action of sending a direct appeal to the leader of a minority political party was taken by the cabinet of Prime Minister Neville Chamber- :ain as, In closest consulation with the United States and France, the ministers met again at 10 Down- ng street with the joint aim of ban- ishing: the threat of war and pre- paring for it if it comes. United States Ambassador Joseph P, Kennedy called at Eownir.g street soon after the appeal was sent for- ward to Viscount Runciman, Brit- ish mediator In Prague, for trans- mission to Henlein. Kennedy called at the express in- vitation of Premier Chamberlain, wrio left the cabinet meeting to re- ceive the American envoy in his private office. Seek To Resume Mediator 'Holt Lord Runciman was instructed to bring all possible pressure to bear (Continues Oa Two) -----BUI' IX NEW CASTLE----- Annual Conclave OfColClU. Gould Widow Suicide Sudeten Germans In Pitched Battle Against Troops Heavy Casualties Result Of Clash On Streets Of Falkenau CZECH GENDARMES REPORTED SHOT DOWN Czech Troops Enter Fray And Use Tanks In Their Attack Convention Held Tuesday In Central Presbyterian Church GROWTH SHOWN IN MOVEMENT HERE BY GEORGE LANGWErL International News Servico Si.iff Correspondent PRAGUE, Sept. 14. the first real foretaste of what may He In wait for the world at large, Sudeten Germans fought a pitched battle with Czechoslovakian troops In the streets of Falkcnau late to- day and fragmentary dispatches hinted a casualty list that may mount into the scores. The battle broke out when Czech police attempted to break up a clash between Sudetens and communists trithout the use of weapons. Two thousand Sudetens turned upon the police, driving them Into the local police station and later ejecting them by force, shooting them down In the streets as they ran to cover. Czech Troops Go Into Action First reports said from 10 to 15 I gendarmes were killed in the initial fighting. Czech troops went into 1 action a short time later and were believed to have inflicted heavy casualties on the Sudetens. Heavy tanks wheeled Into action small shells into the Sudeten lines after the initial out- break. Early reports said casualties among the Sudetens eventually i proved heavier than among the I Czechs. When the Czech police attempted Hold Key To Peace Or War? Czechs Reinforce Troops On German Border AreaToday Also Extend Martial Law Decree To Two More Districts REFUSE ULTIMATUM MADE BY SUDETENS Still Hope Basis Tor Re- sumption. Of Czech-Sude- ten Negotiations ADOLF HITLER AND KONRAD HENLEIN THEY HOLD KEY TO PEACE OR WAR Fuehrer Adolf Hitler's Nuremberg speech, promising Sudeten German protection and producing "self- determination" for the Germanic minority as the Implied a-ltemative to forcible action against Czechoslovakia, adds to the war scare already serious and projects Hitler and Ms Nazi leader In Czechoslovakia. Konrad Hen- leln. In the center of the world news spotlight. This excellent photo of Hitler, left, and Henleir. was taken during a recent series of conferences at Hitler's retreat. No Statement On U.S. Policy Will Be Given Report Hitler Apparently Decided Time Not Ripe For Sudeten Showdown United States To "Freedom Of Action" IE European Crisis By PIERRE J. HUSS NVws Servico S (TnlcrTmlJonal Service) Sepl. The United States will maintain "free- to break up the Sudeten-communist! clash, the Henlelnlsts forgot their dom of action" in the present Euro- crL'ys, It was learned today original adversaries and Lurr.ed up- j on highest authority, on the comparatively of policemen. The latter withdrew into the po- small group i This government, it tvns asserted. i Is not prepared to make definite an- ['commitments to any European pow- Pictured above is Mrs. Harold C. grUy through the streets outside, er in the present dynamite-laden Daily Weather Report "United States weather statistics for the 24-hour period ending at 5 p. m. Tuesday: Maximum temperature. 79. Minimum temperature, 66. Precipitation. .11 inches. River stage, 5.3 feet. Statistics for the same date a year ago follow: Maximum temperature, 61, Minimum temperature, 45. Precipitaiton. A spirit of firm, sustained resist- ance to the liquor traffic was appar- ent in every report and every ad- dress yesterday at the 54th annua convention of the Lawrence County Woman's Christian Temperance Un- ion in Central Presbyterian, church of downtown New Castle, Such a spirit held Londonderry during that memorable siege of years ago and brought victory against heavy odds; such a spiril may bring victory to the W, C. T. U against odds just as formidable. Membership Increase. One thing is certian. The Law- rence County W. C. T. U. is grow- ing. Reports at the convention on Tuesday showed that 47 members had been added to the roll this year two new L. T. L.'s were organized, one T. L. B. and one senior union. Frances WHlard Union of New Cas- tle sponsors the largest L. T. L. One (Continued On Pn.ee Six) -----BBX IN NEW CASTLE----- Economic Agencies Plan For Emergency (International N'ewa Service! WASHINGTON, Sept. of the government's economic r.gon- cies today hurriedly charged a se- ries of emergency measures design- ed to bolster the American finan- cial structure against possible Euro- Secretary of the Treasury Mor- genthau, it was learned, worked far nto the night with his advisers in an effort to work out a program to prevent a repetition of the finap- :ial chaos that attended the out- break of the World War in 1914. At the same time, the Securities ind Exchange Commission at its 'egular session yesterday afternoon discussed the effect of war psy- hology on stock trading. Close touch was maintained with Wail Street although no action was planned by the commission. Strotz, who was discovered uncon- scious on the kitchen floor of her Park Avenue, New York, apart- ment by her husband, a millionaire broker. Five jets of the gas range were open. Mrs. Strotz, widow of Jay Gould, grandson of the railroad builder, later died. -BUT IK NEW CASTLE----- New Demand By Sudetens (International News Service) LONDON, Sept. The Sudeten German party this afternoon Issued a communique at Asch demanding the "right of it was stated In a Reuter dispatch from Prague. This was the demand made by Reichsfuehrer Adolf Hit- ler in his speech at Nuremberg Monday. The Sudetens added they are de- shouting epithets and daring the (Continued On Pace Two) -----BUT IN NEW CASTLE------ President To Return East Report At Hospital At Rochester, Minn., On Son's Condition Is Favorable By GEORGE DURNO International Service Staff Corrcsponticii C situation. Reports from London that Britain was seeking "further clarification" of America's intentions or. the neu- trality aci, should war come in Eu- rope, v.-ere unconfirmed here. It was pointed out that the neutrality act, mokes it mandatory on Presi- dent Roosevelt to put the act into effect in event he finds a "stale of war" u> exlit. This mandate, however, is discre- tionary in that U leaves the presi- dent free to determine when there is a state of war, In the Instance of the Slno-Japanese conflict, now In its second year, the neutrality embargo on sale of nrms, ammuni- tion arid Implements of war has not been Invoked. There hns not been any declaration ol war between Ja- pan and China. Observers here stated that a sim- lilar situation might conceivably By GEORGE LANGWEIL International Service Sraff Correspondent PRAGUE, Sept. Three new divisions of Czechoslovak troops were rushed to the German border today and the Prague gov- ernment declared two addi- tional districts of Sudeten- land under martial law. but hope remained that some basis would he found for re- i sumption of Czech-Sudeten j negotiations. The new military meas- ures represented the govern- ment's answer to the Sude- ten memorandum demand- ing withdrawal of Czech police and troops from their BERLIN, Sepl. 14. fuehrer Hitler apparently has decided that trie time !s not yet ripe for a showdown 02 the ex- plosive Sudeten issue, this corre- spondent Informed by high and usually reliable Nazi quarters to- lage in the Sudeten region involved ir. the virtual revolt which follow- ed establishment of the Prague regime. j territory. Always late U) retire and early to I Czechs Refn-se Surrender rise, the Fuehrer kept post- j The action demonstrated Czech- ed throughout last nighc and to-j oslovakia's refusal to surrender ILS i day on every development in the sovereignty :o the Sudeten minority and backing from rhe danger-laden situation. His exact whereabouts, however, army abroad. Only the most slender were unknown. Government head- link remained m the minority nego- spent part of ias: night in his j be vatc apartment in Munich and then j Frank chief sid W. his threatening j he about resumption of would entitled to se.'f-dewrminauon .inc. that he would see they pot it. the Fuehrer seemingly has reached the conclusion that the stage is not yec properly set for a decisive blow'. Hourly HU decision was reported based on hourly reports received during the night from every town and vil- procceded Berchtesgnden. his mountain vi'Ja a: I o: Viscount Runciraan. British meti- iator. called on Konrad Henlein. For at least part of his morning. I Sudeten leader, at Asch. Present he still was at his picturesque :ry home !n the Bavarian Alps. While the world was haunted by the threat of war. sources closest (Continued On TTCO) Report Czechs Acted To Foil Sudeten Plot (tntrrmi Mnnn I Ni-n-y Service) PARTS. Sept. Discovery 'oy a carefully organized plot by Sudeten i come "again in Europe bu: that no Germans to seize their own area ROCHESTER, Minn., Sept, j definite commitments were contem- 1 and declare Immediate anschluss ist before President Roosevelt paid binding tills country In any with Germany led to declaration of termined to maintain the demands i DUjietjn issued at 9 SUS" standard time, read: 'Mr, James Roosevelt enjoyed a pension of martial law. Prague's "final" proposals of Sep- (International Servico) HAERISBURG, sept. eorge "H. Earle today signed the providing for the state to take over responsibility of medical aid to ndlgents and two other measures authorizing extension of Capitol park at Harrisburg. The first bill shifts the financial and administrative burden of medi- cal care for persons on relief from the individual counties to the com- monwealth. It settles a controversy if the past year over interpretations of the 1937 The Capitol park extension bills uithorize the General State Au- thority to lease or acquire land be- ng obtained by the local housing uthority for slum clearance pur- xjscs. Construction of new state wildings on the extended area vould be undertaken by the au- horlty. t comfortable night, Although the we saUsfactorv Iee; ha[ js progress. Temperature 99.5, pulse 84. Respiration and blood pressure normal." The bulletin was signed by Dr. tember 9, which the Sudetens had crJUcal dcd hBS not vel d previously accepted as a basis for i_ ._.. i.i..i negotiations, were flatly rejected in the communique. -----BUI IN NEW CASTLE-----, State Takes Over Cost Of Medical Care Of Indigents IN HEW CASTLE Just a final 'hospital visit to his son, manner in '.he present crisis James, preparatory to entraining for lha east as the ugly spectre of an- other European war held civiliza- tion breathless, Mayo clinic physi- cians today reported the patient making satisfactory progress. Report Sudetens Fleeing Across German Border BERLIN. Sept. ews Service) Scores Of Sudeten Germans arc fleeing across the Czech border inio Germany, the Germ tin official ported today. news ngency rc- Villagcs in the Breiter.bftch sec- Lion have been evacuated with the Harold K. Gray, surgeon who re- moved Jim's gastric ulcer Sunday, and Dr, George Eusterman, diagnos- "'Despite the fact that not all dan- exception of a few old women, siud ger has passed, the president pre-! the agency, and many vhlages of! pared to head east at 11 a. ;n.! the Schwaderbach area have moved into German Sachsenberg. -----BUI' IN NEW CASTI.E----- Report Troops Are Moving Toward German Frontier (Interim t'onnl Ncivs VI will return to London from Bnl- LONDON, Sept. London moral tonight owing to the. serious j Daily Express reported from Prague international situation, it was an- today that Czechoslovaldan ti'oops During the entire trip he will keep :n touch with the crisis in foreign affairs, ------UUV IN NEW CASTLE------ King Will Return To London Tonight News Service) LONDON, Sept. George martial law by Czech authorities, It was stated by a well-informed au- thority here todr.y. Mere disorders could have been coped wltli, It wus said, but author- ities discovered a plot Instigated by the Nazf Gestapo and storm troop- ers in the Sudeten urea. Discovery of the plot, this In- formant said, prompted Premier Mila Hodza to dispatch his army to the border arens and maintain order js well as reinforce the frontier. The Czech government Is reluct- ant to publicize details o( the plol.. it wns said, since it proves "beyond doubt" Germany's direct Involve- in en i, In the Sudeten, dispute. Pub- lication of such charges at the moment It is felt, would serve only to heighten tension. -----nUV IS SEW CASTLE----- Ensilage Blast Fatal To Farmer; Father Is Injured (Interimtlonrxl N'oivs Service) WARREN, Pa., Sept, clog- gcd pipe line today wns blamed for oparntol. o[ anothcr boat and Chris I the explosion of an ensilage machine Assert Italy To Aid Germany If France Attacks By FRANK GERVASI also were Gwackin's assistants, Geoffrey Peto and Ian Henderson. as well as Karl Frank f.nd Deputy Kurvsei of the Sudetens. A brief communique issued after the meeting was uniformative, but it was apparent contact is still be- ing maintained and the hope of re- sumption of negotia 'or_? kept alive. Fatal Xcw Disorders Fatal new disorders, some on m major scale, were reported from several areas. Two Czechs killed in fights at Komocau and Yakhifoss. Unconfirmed reports said Czech. (Conllnntd On Two) -----BVJT rx NEW CASTLE----- France Ready For Mobilization ROME. (Copyright 19381 Sept. Italy march to Germany's aid if Britain or Francs violates Germany's fron- tiers in attempting to assist Czecho- slovnkia, it was learned today an unimpeachable authority. f Tntorr.ation.T] Ne LONDON, Sept. The diplo- matic correspondent of the London Evening Standard reported Today that France has notified Czechoslo- At the sfime time, Italy's position i, in the Czech crisis further j vokia that she will "mobilize when clarified by the c'.ear-cu; assertion j from an authorized government i source: "Only totf" rprritorial annexstiou of the pi'ovinces by Ger- many will bring Europe safely through this emergency." ------BL'T.' IX NEW C.ASTLE------ Man Is Killed In Clash With Shrimp Strikers (Tntornallonnl News Service) ARANSAS PASS. Texas. Sept. 14. man was shot and killed and several others were injured, two ser- iously, Cbdtxy in a clash between shrimp fishing boatmen and pickets during a CIO strike nt the Rice Shrimp cannery here. Jim Cole, operator of one of the boats for the Rice Cannery died of pistol shot, wounds, J, B. Music. Czechs do." France, this report stated, also lias assured Prague that even rn- ilrect participation of Germany la i a Sudeten rising will be considered an act of aggression and will in- voke the Franco-Czech military al- -BL'V I.V N'BlV CASTLE- Arthur Mometer Don't n raincoat or umbrel- nounced officially today. are pouring across the country A communique issued al Bucking- toward the ham Palace stated: "The king, who proposcu to leave German frontier. The Daily Sketch, in n Prague dis- Balmoral Thursday night for the patch, said that Czech officials have funeral of Prince .irthur of Con- j closed the Czech-Gcrmnn frontier naught, decided to proceed to Lon- at Mulbach, near Effcr, scene ol don tonight in order to have further bloody riot.5 yesterday. The border time for discussion of the incerna- j was closed at 3 a. in., the report tional situation with his ministers." I stated. here which killed Herbert Homer, 23, and blew away the left hand.of his father, C. J. Homer. Roy Ake- ley, passerby, also was hurt by the blast, A pipe '.ending from the machine to the silo became clogged, causing the blast, In the opinion of Coroner Ed Lowrcy. ------I1UY IN. NKW CASTLE------ Cecil Potter mid DivR. M. Eagle- son, of East Washington street, have left for a weeks' vacation trip Into Canada. Clarlck, president of the United Canncrs Puckers and Agricultural Workers, a CIO ivfflllnte, were the two Injured seriously. ------11U1' IN NliW CASTLE------ DEATH RECORD Wcdncsdny, Sept. M, 1938 Albert H. Albcn, SG, 1202 West Washington street. 'ugh, 10, Elhi-ood City. la, perhaps I'm j'.ist fi fella who docs things raihf queeriy. had the rain not around and soaked the crops and and ground, we might have pa'.d clearly. Bttt here it tf. a sociking diizzlc, 1hat spats and spouts and sometimes swivels soak's the garden crops, assuring sands and pickled scalHons, tomato juices by the "gallions" and pork and rye and 'hops Oh let it rain. I'll take the soaking, me iriends 1 am not joking, red jus! that :Mij, U'e and got it, hear me. it's to start the lelt cheering, i'.'s seventy-six today.   

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