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New Castle News Newspaper Archive: August 16, 1938 - Page 1

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   New Castle News (Newspaper) - August 16, 1938, New Castle, Pennsylvania                                NEWS PHONES 4000 Telephone Your News Hems To Call 4000, NEW CASTLE NEWS WEATHER Cloudy, Probably Local 'Showers To- night And Wednesday. FIFTY-EIGHTH YEAR-No. 240 NEW CASTLE, PA., TUESDAY, AUGUST PAGES THREE CENTS A COPY PICK NINES JURY CAREFULLY Characterizes IPA As'Front' For Communists Congressman Assails WPA And Relief Agency Be- fore Probe Committee CLAIM RUSSIANS SPEND Old Timers Prepare For Annual Reunion Europe Puzzled As Hitler Calls Aides To Confer Wednesday The Red Letter Day In Cascade Park For Old Timers And Friends PRESIDENT SANKEY READY FOR CROWD Labor Head Offers Evidence To Prove Sit Down Strikes Communistic By WILLIAM S. NEAl International News Servloa Slajf Correspondent Aup. WPA Is a "front orfranizalion" for the communist a. v member of the conyrewiional commlltce JnvestlgratinK un- Ameircan activities charged to- day. The committecman, Rep. Thomas (R) of New Jersey, characterized New Deal re- lief agency, headed by Adminis- trator Harry L. Hopkins, as a "very dangerous Fry Testifies Again. Rep. Thomas' statement came 83 John P. Frey, high official and spokesman for the American Fed- eration of Labor, started his third day's testimony before the commit- Frcy offered in evidence purported secret Stalinist documents to show that communists were chiefly re- sponsible lor the creat "sit-down" gtrike which paralyzed the automo- bile industry. As Frey took the stand, Interna- tional News Service was informed that charges of lavish spending by Russia to Sovietize the United States be submitted to the commh- tee. More than a year in communist money has been poured Into this country, these charges a.re expected to show. Sketching communist activities in the United Automobile Workers un- ion briefly, Frey said that President (Cantinml OB Two) PANEWC OBSERVES Tomorrow Is the Red Letter Day of the year for the pioneers of Law- rence county, when those who have lived here prior to 1861, or are de- scendants of families who lived in the county during that period, will gather at Cascade park lor the 31st annual reunion and picnic. Assembly has been called at the pavilion at 1 o'clock, so that the Old Timers can get seated and be ready for the opening of the program prompcly at Many will take their picnic baskets along and have a picnic lunch in the grove, where tables have been reserved for their use at noon and in the evening. Arrangements have .been made for them to check their baskets at she grove also, and lunch can be se- cured there along with, picnic sup- plies for those who do not bring them alcng, The opening number on the after- noon's program will be a quadrille by the pupils of Croton school, di- (Coutlauca OIL Two) County Health Officer J. Frank Stevens, has his tomahawk out for persons who are throwing garbage along Mercer street between Clen- moore boulevard and Hazelcroft av- enue. He says that they tie their garbage up in papers, drive along Mercer street, and hurl it out. It presents an unsightly appearance as as being detrimental to health. He says that arrests will follow if the practice Is not stopped. Health conditions in the county are excep- tionally good at present, according to Mr. Stevens. It is not necessary for one to live in a palace to have beautiful sur- roundings, On Euclid avenue there is a very modest little cottage, own- ed by Mr. and Mrs, Samuel Leonard, which for artistic trimmings and beauty of surroundings, cannot be surpassed in New Castle. The cot- tage attracts attention with i its pretty lattice work ornaments 'and boxes, while the lawn is a perfect, example of the florists art. The property is on the north side of Euclid avenue, a short distance in from the Wilmington road and is well worth a visit. An unusual suit has been filed in Beaver county which calls in ques- tion the responsibility of munici- palities or corporation's owning swimming pools. A lad by the name of Ralph Pfaller has just sued the Beaver Valley Traction Company for injuries received at a diving tower erected by the company at the Junction swimming pool. He de- clares the accident was caused by the negligence of the traction com- pany in not having non-skid rounds on the ladder to the tower. In traveling hither and thither over county roads, going nowhere in particular, but bent only on helping Scully Against NewFloodWall For Pittsburgh Golden Tri- angle Business District Look Like Peniten- tiary" (International News Service} PITTSBURGH, Aug. Cornelius D. Scully today took a. irm, official stand against propos- als to build a flood wall around the ity's business section, the so-called 'golden 'triangle" which is bounded by the Allegheny and Monongaiiela rivers as they flow into the Ohio. In a letter to Lieut. Col. W. E. R. Covell, head of the TJ. S. engineers here, the mayor asserted he would not condone any flood 'control pro- tection plans which did not provide for co-ordination with a water front boulevard and park. A model section of the proposed flood wall has been erect- ed by the U. S. engineers to give Fittsburghers a birds eye view of how a flood wall would appear. Its chief disadvantages appear to be its lack of architectural beauty, interference with traffic and traffic facilities' and waterfront Improvements anri its tendency to make a sort of "peniten- tiary" of the business section. Its chief advantage according to the engineers, is the protection it would afford the city in the event of an- other flood. The flood wall is being planned to protect the city against a flood of 51.4 feet which Col. Covell wrote the mayor may occur on the average of only once every years ac- cording to the law of probability and perhaps may never occur. The dis- Ray Riddle Is Now Improving Victim Of BuII'i Attack At Edenburg Farm Saturday h Better Today Two Planes Crash Five Fliers; Six More Injured Highest Military Leaders Called Into Conference As War Games Start By PIERRE J. HTJSS Interratlonal News Slaft Correspondent BERLIN, Aug. diplo- matic circles speculated excitedly today over the meaning of a con- ference between Chancellor Hitler, and his highest military and cabinet aides, held only a iew hours after Der Fuehrer launched the Reich's gigantic war maneuvers. After inaugurating the show of force by reviewing crack troops at Jueterbog. Hitler returned unex- pected to Berlin and conferred with his advisers. There was no official announce- ment regarding the nature of their discussion, but a few hours later the war ministry declared that the or- der for calling up reservists will ap- ply to Austria as well as to Germany proper. Austria has a long common boun- dry with Czechoslovakia, where con- siderable apprehension has been aroused by the German military maneuvers, especially In view of the Nazi-Czech crisis over the Sudeten erman autonomy issue. While officials were reluctant to discuss the conversation Hitler held with his chiefs, it was learned the major topics were the conduct of the six-weeks war games, which began yesterday, and the forthcoming; visit to Berlin of Admiral Nicholas Hor- thy, Hungary's regent. Despite efforts of Nazi officials to calm Europsan apprehension, public uneasiness regarding the Czechoslovakian controversy and the general European situation spread inside1 Germany itself.. This was re- flected by a sharp slump on the Improvement was noted today in the condition of W. Raymond Bid- ,_ die, of Edenburg, who" was ba'dly Navy Officials Seek Cause gored by a mad bull at the farm of his father, W. Biddle, late afternoon, when he attempted to fescue the body of his father, who had been killed by the enraged animal a few minutes be- fore. Mr. Biddle, who is county cir- culation solitor for The News, suf- fered a broken collar bone, a severe laceration of the thigh and other injuries, when the bull attacked him. German stock market yesterday. The annual maneuvers, expected to involve some men, were Barring complications, a speedy recovery from his injuries is an- ticipated. YeggsConfess To Kidnapping Of Society Pair G-Men Capture Two Ex-Con- victs Near St. Paul And Obtain Confession Of Two Crashes Near San Dieg-o, Cal. WRECKAGE AFFORDS NO CLUES TO CAUSE ONE TRIES ESCAPE, THEY MOW HIM DOWN (International News Service) ST. PAUL. Minn., Aug. eral agents today announced the ar- rest of two ex-convicts, who con- fessed the 36-hour "kidnaping of Peggy Gross, St. Louis society girl, and- her escort, Daniel Fahey, Jr. The men seized late last night are James 21, of Lynwood, Ark., and John Couch, 23, St. Louis. They were captured by a squad of G-men and police .on a farm nine miles east of Effie, near the Canadian about 25 miles north of St. Paul. Meredith resisted arrest and was mowed down by the officers' gun- fire. He was taken to the Grand (International News Service) SAN DIEGO, Cal., Aug. United States navy fliers were dead today and six were suffering in- juries, victims of two separate-plane crashes occurring within the space of a. few hours. The dead: B. T. McKenzie, rank .and home address unavailable, H. Buckmann, rank and home ad- dress unavailable. Mike F. Moscicki, aviation ma- chinist's mate, Pensacola. Ra. Don Fay Smith, radioman, third class, Des Moines, Iowa. Ralph Thomas Carter, aviation ordnanceman, San Diego, Navy officials withheld the names of four of the injured men, but said that A. A. aviation ma- chinist's mate, and R, O. Chrisinger were seriously injured. McKenzie and Buckmann 'were killed late last night when ft navy bombing patrol plane smashed nose first injo San Diego bay, authorities said. Pour youths in a rowboat saw the wash and rescued the six survivors, and helped, recover the bodies of the two dead fliers. Moscicki, Smith and Carter were killed when the plane they were flying, a Douglas torpedo tpye, sud- denly went in to-a spin over Camp Kearny Mesa, at a foot altitude and dove w the ground. A board of inquiry was scheduled to begin'investigations today to de- termine cause of the crashes. Navy officials said they were at a loss to understand why the shree men did not use their parachutes. They also said there appeared to be no clue to the crash In the wreck- age. Nonchalant Hines At Trial Dewey Cautious As He Examines Talesmen Called Task Of Convicting Popular Tammany Leader Ap- pears To Be Difficult Nonchalantly lighting a cigarette is James J. Hines, Tammany district boss, as he arrives at supreme court, in New York City, with his attorney, Joseph Shallect At the last minute, Hines' co-dsfendent in the numtcrs racket charge, Martin Weintraub, was granted a separate trial, Rapids, Minn., hospital. No com- ment was made on his condition believed to have been the chief sub- I Couch was lodged in the Grand ject of the talk. Among those par- ticipating in the discussion were Marshal Hermann Wilhelm Goering, air minister, General Wilhelm Kei- tel, chief of staff, and Col.-Gen. Walther Von Erauchitsch, army commander-in-chief. Scranton Draws Legion Group Local Delegation Is Leaving1 To Attend Annual State Convention This Week BAND TO LEAVE EARLY ON FRIDAY Scranton will be the mecca for B. number of the members of the Perry S. Gaston Post American Legion, who will attend the annual state astrous 1936 flood by comparison convention of "the veterans order, TI-O B ifi -fftDT. _ _ __. 46 (CoBtinma On Two) Dally Weather I Report United States weather statistics the 24-hour period ending at 5 o'clock Monday afternoon are as follows: Maximum temperature, 92, Minimum temperature, 68. No precipitation, River stage, 4.2 feet. Statistics for the same date a year ago, follow: Maximum temperature, 86. Minimum temperature, 53, Precipitation, -01 President Leaves Wednesday For His Trip To Canada Will Through Maryland, Penniylvania And York On Way To Canada Convicts Escape At Texas Prison (International Service) HUNTSVILLE, Aug. 1 and the Castle of Mrxlti'eniz. News Service) WASHINGTON, Aug. ident Roosevelt will make a non- stop trip through Maryland. Penn- sylvania and New York tomorrow enroute to two "good neighbor" ceremonies in Canada, according to an informal itinerary made public today by the White House. The chief executive will receive a, degree from Queens' College in Kingston, Ontario, Thursday morn- ing. In the afternoon, in company with Canadian Premier McKenzie King, will dedicate the new eight and a half mile international bridge running between Collins Landing, New York and Ivy Lea, Ontario, through the Thousand Islands. The presidential special will leave Washington shortly after one o'clock I The convicts, working In a hoe tomorrow afternoon and will be squad, slipped behind Guard Greer routed by way o' Baltimore, Harris- and rushed him, stabbing him twice, burg. Rcnova, Emporium and Buf- Greet', however, managed to fire his falo, reaching Kingston about nine i gun twice, but he said it was doubt- o'clock Thursday, morning. j f ul U my of the wu bit. which convenes Thursday and closes with the parade on Saturday after- noon. Commander Norman P, Nelson and District Commander Guy J. Wadlinger left for the scene of the convention Sunday, and they will be joined by the post's three other del- egates, Dave Bollard. Amzi L. -Conn and Alex Thomas in time for the opening of the convention Thurs- day. The post's cadet band, national champions of the American Legion in their class, will lead the local del- Rapids jail. Gun Battles. Robert Hendon, chief of the G- men in this district, said the pair confessed "several other including a running gun battle with Texas officers between Dallas and Fort Worth several weeks ago. The men were trapped on the farm of Charley Rotts, father-in- law or Meredith, by the government agents and a squad of police under Glen Miller, police chief of Big- Fork, Minn. Hendon declared that Couch sur- rendered immediately, but Meredith offered resistance and was shot down. Meredith is separated from his wife, and Hendon said Rotts ap- (ContlnTnl On Tttt Two) Insurgents Are Pushing Ahead On Two Fronts Report More Than Government Soldiers Cap- tured On Ebro River Front Clnlernalional' News Service) HENDAYE, FRANCO SPANISH BORDER, Aug. spec- tacular gains on the Catalan and Southern Spanish .fronts were claim- Heat Kills Two Hottest August 16 Since 1888 According To Weather Bureau Records (Internationa' News Service) PITTSBURGH, Aug. The thermometer soared anew today to- ward record-breaking heights, leav- ing .in its wake two deaths directly attributable to the oppressive heat wave. The victims were: Paul Ratchley, 50, of Rock Sta- tion, who collapsed yesterday while at work in the Pittsburgh and West Virginia railroad yards and Joseph Disilnestro. who died early today in a. hospital after being taken ill yesterday while at work in the Homestead 'plant of Carnegie-Illi- nois Steel Corporation. A record 38 years old went by the boards yesterday when the mercury climbed up to 93 degrees. During the night it dropped to 16 but bright and early this morning it began reaching 80 degrees at eight o'clock. The weather bureau's record for this date, August 16, is 93 degrees, reached way back in 1888. Said Weather Forecaster W. S. (Couttmnfl On Tuft Tvo> Terrorism Blazes Hold Reunion Of Roundheads At Noon Today Famous Old Regiment Re- membered At Reunion In Central Church For The People JAMES P. SANKEY ABLE TO ATTEND A noon banquet and B speaking prowam which continued into the afternoon.headlined the 73rd annual. reunion of surviving members and' descendants of members of the 100th (Roundhead) regiment, Penn- sylvania- veteran volunteers, which took place today in Central Presby- terian White Hall .TO i the regiment's reunion crowd. j Over BO Attend Today. A group of over 60 enjoyed din- ner and participated in the program which followed. Like in past years, the after-dinner speeches turned back the pages of history and re- called again the thrilling experi ences of ivhen the Round to the Union cause in the critical Civil war days. Fred L. Rentz was toastmai- ter. Prominent on the program was 92-year-old James P. Sankey of Craftoa. lor.g Ihe president of the Roundhead reunion organization, who told today's audience of the re- cent North-South reunion on the battlefield of Gettysburg. Sankey was active in that historic celebra- tion. Sankey HINES AND WEINTRAUB IN SEPARATE TRIALS 'Dixie" Davis, Former Lawyer For "Dutch" Schultz To Testify For State By EDWIN C. HILL International News Service SLaif Correspondent NEW YORK, Auff. James J. Hines, for more than a quarter of a century! powerful in the councils of Tammany tvent into the second day of his trial Prosecutor Thomas E. Dewey and his own chief counsel, Lloyd P. Stryker, trying to find a jury that ap- parently doesn't read the newspapers, listens to no gossip, believes in Santa Glaus, and that babies are brought by storks. Both Alert Alert as a paid of bloodhounds on the trail, both Dewey and Stryksr, subtly striving for psychological ad- vantage. determined that no jury- man inU be accepted who has im- plied in preliminary questioning slightest trail of bias or prejudice, completely cleaned out the jury box laie yesterday and then surprisingly accepted six jurors in the last hour. The outstanding points of the Hines case. as It went into its sec- ond day, are ihat Hines will be aried alone, with Martin Weintraub's trial to follow subsequently, if ac all; chac the strategy of both the prosecutions and defense was revealed in the first day's ion? and wearisome quizzing of talesmen; that Hines ascribes the case against him to political per- secution which tie is confident pi defeating: that Prosecutor Dewey is equally confident of arriving at a conviction through the testimony of On Two) Mass Meeting Opens Campaign Sales Mean Jobs Crusade To Get Under Way On Night Of August 29 is the Union veteran .Si court, New York City, to press the state's case against James J. Hines. Tammany boss. Hines is accused as "master minci" in the numbers racket. Near Jerusalem whose profile was chosen for L'r.e commemorative halC dollar coined in connection the Gettysburg celebration. His old home in New known as The torn clown several years ago after having served us a hotel and again as a residence. Five Roundhead ing of the who enlistee1, with the regiment in On Two) Lindberghs Will egation in the parade Saturday j ecl by the Insurgent forces of afternoon, The band will leave the Legion Home at Friday morning in buses and will arrive in Scranton (Continued OB Two) Generalissimo Francisco Franco. On the Ebro river front in Cata- lonia, according to a Salamanca communique, the Insurgent advance continued. More than govern- ment soldiers have been captured in the last 48 hours of fighting, it was claimed.. Far to the south, on the Estre- madura front, the Salamanca an- nouncement said, Insurgent forces reached the banks of the river Zu- gar, north of captured Cabeza De Buey, and occupied Agallera peak (Internavior.nl Sews Service) JERUSALEM, Aug. tions to halt terrorism in the Holy j Mrs. o f 1-nT- Visit In Moscow (Tntcrnntlonnl News Service) Bight long-term convicts, all classed as escaped from Eastman state prison farm, It was announced by prison officials here today; A guard, John Greer. was stabbed in the abdomen and was rushed to the prison hospital here in a serious Land were Intensified today after six Jews were shot and killed and two Jewish women .wounded by Arabs who opened fire from ambush on a bus near Haifa. British troops killed seven of the Arab gunmen in a bloody battle be- fore the outlaw band fled to the hills. Steamers Collide, Report 100 Drowned Many Are Killed More than 500 government mili- tiamen were Wiled and BOO taken prisoner in tills engagement, it was stated. Messages from Barcelona, claimed the government's air force had shot I than 100 persons, 'all believed to (Intcrnntlonii) Newi HONG KONG, Aug. down 21 Insurgent planes in 24 hours. These planes were destroyed, it was stated, in two spectacular. battles In which only one govern- ment, plane was loet. Nevertheless, the Insurgents herv- ily raided uid Charles A. Lindbergh are expected in Moscow tomorrow on a visit, the Soviet radio announced tonight, The announcement said the couple would come here as tourists and make a few flights while in Russia. They also arc expected to attend events during the annual Soviet aviation week which begins Thursday. A downtown parade and huge mass meeting at Taggart Stadium are be- Disti-ict Attorney Thomas E. Dew- jnp planned as opening features of ey is shown arriving sr supreme the National Salesmen's Crusade here, it was learned today. This afternoon the date for Lhe parade and stadium rally will prob- ably be officially set for Monday evening, August 29. General Chairman Louis B. Round and his executive and plan- ning- and other committees will meet I during the coming week to go over lull plans for the" crusade. The cele- bration details were being worked out today. The crusade organization was set up at a rally of business men and public officials !n The Castleton last To Probe Guffey's 'Request'Letters Senate Committee Looks Into Letters Asking; Funds For Campaig-n Arthur Mometer be Chinese, were killed today when the British steamer Tuhgwo col- lided' '4with the German steamer Shansha in a typhoon- at Tungchow near Shanghai. The tank M rwult of tht eruh. DEATH RECORD I August 1C, 1938 j Mrs. Lillian Elder McKinley, Bev- erly Hills, Cal. Charles S. Weiss, Pleasant Hill. 'Robert P. McNany, 60, Etlwood City. Mrs. Scott L. Flaujrhcr, 32. ury, O., H. D. 1. Mrt. Offutt, 12, Slippery aoek. By ARTHUR International News Service Staff Correspondent WASHINGTON. Aug. Senator Joseph F. Gufley CD) of j Pennsylvania, wns touring Europe today., the senate's special cam- paigns, investigating committee was looking into his money-raising schemes for the Keystone site's Democratic ticket in this fall's elec- tioris. In paniculivr, a letter Guffey t.ent to hundreds of "fellow Democrats" seeking campaign contributions, was under examination. The question raised was whether Gui'fey has sent his appeal to fcdeml officeholders and whether there was an violntion of ihc corrupt practices act. A pro- vision of the law forbids candidate? for public office from nskiiift federal employes fov campaign contribu- tions. Other Slnlex The committee, headed by Sena- tor Sheppard (D) of .Texas, also had before it charges of ir.'omu'ar- JtJes in senatorial races in Kentucky, Arkansas. Tennesee, Illinois and South Dakota, In iti effort to Oa Some lads can pick their itcothcf s-pots, they decide to take some 1'mc, to the job fishing trips, and hunt a cooler, breeder dime. They trait till August breezes blow, jresli from the fur- nace so i( seeiius, talks can't cat, or ffcf. much and sleep is spent in some bafE dream. When streets are like an oven's lid. and trees are wilting necth the sun. when it is much too hot to work, it: even muck too hot fun. You liavc to know your weather SIOILS to pick, your spots in just that livzy. and know just when ths hot Nirutf to.   

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