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New Castle News Newspaper Archive: March 25, 1931 - Page 1

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Publication: New Castle News

Location: New Castle, Pennsylvania

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   New Castle News (Newspaper) - March 25, 1931, New Castle, Pennsylvania                                NEWS PHONES 4000 Telcptiune Yuut Newi, To The Call 4000 NEW CASTLE NEWS WEATHER Colder Tonight And Thursday, With Rain Changing To Snow. FIFTY-FIRST YEAR No. 154 NEW CASTLE, PA., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 1931. PAGES THREE CENTS A COPY New Castle Merchants Vote Against Daylight Time Observance CONTRACTS Merchants Vote Down Proposal To Change Time Only Industries Will Ob- serve Daylight Saving Here This Sum- mer SATURDAY EVENING CLOSING TABLED Grange Representatives And Ministers Protest Against Changing Time D.iyliyhl Siiviug Time will Lie observed by the industries of the city during: the months of June, July, and August, but the stores and commer- cial cstiiblishmontis, schools, jiud churches -will run on Eastern Standard Time. This action was taken at a meet- ing of the Better Business Bureau of the New Castle Chamber of Com- merce nt their meeting held in the Y. W. C. A. last evening. Decision lo operate on Eastern Standard time came after vigorous protests against Daylight Savings were registered by ihc ministers and representatives of the Pomona Grange of Lawrence County. Grangers Insistent Spokesmen for the grangers even intimated that the farmers might re-sort to boycotting the merchants of the city if a decision to adopt Daylight Savings Time was made by the merchants, and when a vote on the matter was taken, the mer- chants voted almost unanimously to continue operating on Eastern Standard Time throughout the sum- mer. The committee consisting of W. S. Fullerton. chairman; John W. Cox. Rankin Johnston, and A. H. Fiillcrton. representing the Pomona Grange of Lawrence County and the Fruit Growers Association, slated that all agricultural interests of the county were 100 per cent against the observance of Daylight Savings Time. Rev. D. C. Schnebly. president; and Rev. G. S. Bennett of the New Castle Ministerial Association were in attendance to express the views of the ministers of the city and to report the action taken by their association at a meeting held March Fliers Fail To Discover Any Trace Of Missing Men Near Viking Wreck By E. A. JEFFERY International News Service Special Correspondent ST. JOHNS, N. F., Mar. for additional survivors of the seal- ing ship Viking dwindled consider- ably today when Bernt Balchen and his two companions after flying back and forth over Horse Island and White Bay for several hours late yesterday, reported no signs of the missing men. Visibility was excellent, the air trio reported, and conditions were favorable for low flying. They hop- ped off from Comer Brook, flew over the middle of Notre Dame Bay to Gull Island, thence fifteen miles to sea, and criss-crossed over Par- tridge Point on Horse Island. Aft- er failing to find any trace of the score of Viking men on the south side of White Bay, they brought their plane back to Comer Brook. The South Polar airman hoped to make another flight over White Bay and vicinity today or tomorrow. He was engaged for the search by Dr. Lewis Frissell of New York, father of one of the two missing Americans. Several of the thirteen survivors of the1 126 men saved after the de- struction of the Viking by explosion Death Knell For Anti-Blue Laws Committee Votes To Postpone Indefinitely Action On All Anti-Blue Law Billi fInternational News Service) HARRISBUEG, Mar. knell for attempts at revision or lib- eralization of the "blue laws" of 1794 was sounded for the present legislative session today when the House Law and Order committee voted, 17 to 8, to postpone indifin- itely action on all "anti blue law" and fire were frankly skeptical on i tDls now before the body. their arrival here aboard the Sa- gona as to the finding of additional survivors in the Ice fields. They were inclined to believe most of the missing men were killed by the disastrous gunpowder blast, or died shortly after. They held out little hope-for Varick FrisseU. the motion picture expedition leader, and A, G. Penrod, his cameraman. The Sagona brought part of the survivors 'here yesterday, most of these consisting of the- ill or In- jured Viking victims. The other survivors will be brought here by tile rescue ship Prospero. 16. when opposition to Daylight Savings Time was voted. Industries Favorable A letter addressed to A. H. Fuller- ton from D. S. Pyle. representing the manufacturers of the city was read before the meeting. This let- Con tinned On Two) Natives Parade At Virgin Islands Before President Hoover Watches Picturesque Parade At St. Thomas As Arrival Greet- ing ACQUATIC QUEEN QUAINT SCENES GREET PRESIDENT Hoover About Ready To Begin Homeward Jour- ney From Carib- bean By GEORGE E. DURNO International Kevv Service Coneipondent ST. THOMAS, Virgin Islands, Mar. pictur- esque parade by natives of the Virgin Islands today featured the arrival here of PA NEWC OBSERVES Motorists of New Castle will heartily approve the announcement of Police Chief C. C. Horner that police are to effectively enforce the stop signs. Certain It is that ef- fective enforcement of this regula- tion would be an additional guaran- tee of more safety on the streets of the city. Yesterday's rainfall was one of the licnvlest of the year to date, a third of an Inch of rainfall being record- ed during the past 24 hours. The moving season is rapidly ap- proaching and many New Castle residents arc planning to change lo- cations April 1 and May 1. Reports received by Pa. Ncwc to- day are to the effect that autos are plowing through a pool of water on Butler avenue at the corner of Mary- land avenue, and providing a unique scene. There is a sunken section in the paving where some of the con- President Hoover on his tour of the West Indian posses- sions of the United States. The President was greeted at the pier by Governor Paul Pearson of Swarthntore. Pa., and Captain Wal- do Evans, retiring Naval Governor of the islands. As Mr. Hoover and his party disembarked from the U. S. S. Arizona, he and his party made their way to the dock in a motor-boat through a double line of gaily decor- ated canoes. Parade Is Viewed The President looked on with in- terest as the parade filed through the streets of this quaint town, nes- tled at the base of a. mountain and fronting on a beautiful harbor. The marchers included fruit and vegetable vendors, balancing heav- ily laden trays and sellers of milk and grass rumbling along in tiny carts or riding on the backs of don- keys. "Martial" music was furnished by (Continued On Two) ------------1 Martial Law Is Set Up In Peru Loyal Troops Kill Between 40 And 50 Rebellious Soldiers In Peru The committee agreed to report out but one amendatory bill, that by Rep. Schwartz, Philadelphia, which would permit Sunday milk deliveries until 10 a. m. Present lim itation on such deliveries is until 9 a. m. Miss Mitchell Exonerated In Death Of Child Coroner's Jury Declares Fa- tality At Bessemer Un- avoidable Accident TESTIMONY SHOWED CAR GOING SLOW Lodges Share In Reception Here Grand Exalted Ruler Law- rence Rupp Greeted By Elks Host LARGE CLASS GIVEN INITIATORY DEGREES Tammany Chiefs Silent About Probe Of Mayor; No Comment Anywhere Dinner At The Castleton Preceding Lodge Ses- sion Is Notable Function Inquest Is Held At Besseme: Municipal Building On Tuesday Evening- sports at the University of Iowa are ruled by Miss Gretchen Pulley, above, of Maquoketa, la., who was chosen queen at the annual water review.. She is a junior. City Manager Plan Possible New Castle Could Act On Project If Bill Passes Legislature BILL IS PENDING AT PRESENT TIME flnternailonnl Newt Service. LIMA. Peru, Mar. _____ crcte has dropped a little and a pool j law again prevailed throughout I votes cast are divided by the num- ifter a spectacular at- j ber of candidates in the field, and (From News Bureau) (State Capital) HARRISBTJRG, Pa., Mar. If the Moore City Manager bill now before the legislature, ever is enacted into law, New Castle, along with the other cities of the state will have the opportunity of decid- ing for itself, whether or not it will change Its present mode of govern- ment, and have the business of the j city conducted by a trained man- ager. In addition, the city would decide whether or not it would hold its elections by the Propor- tional Representation plan. Proportional Representation Is now in use ill Cleveland, and Cin- cinnati, O., as well as the city man- ager plan. Under P. R., party lines are more or less done away with in municipal elections and it Is In reality a preferential ballot, Briefly the systeji is this, the number of Maud Mitchell, 201 Elm street, this city, was exonerated by a coroner's jury last night in the d-.ath of Santa Bombara, four and one-half year old daughter of Mr and Mrs. Joseph Bombara, of Bes- semer, who was fatally injured when struck by Miss Mitchell's auto on last Saturday evening. The verdict read, "We do not fine Kiss Mitchell, the driver of the car guilty of any criminal negligence finding a verdict of accidental death, according to the testimony.' The jury was composed of A. J. Bates, R. R. Shroop. K. E. Mane- wal, William Gabert, Archie A. Bruno and S. J. Irwin. In Bessemer Boro Ball Inquest was held in the municipal building by Coroner J. P. Caldwell. Attorney Joseph Leta, of this city, represented the parents of the little girl. Constable A. A. Bhoup, the first witness, explained a diagram of the sti-eet where the accident occurred. It vrfvs on West Poland avenue, near the intersection of Elm street. Mr. Shoup had also measured marks on the pavement where tLe car of Miss Mitchell skidded when she applied the brakes in an effort to avoid the accident. He said the distance was about 42 feet. Alfred Swanson testified that he was standing by the west side of his house on Poland avenue. There is a drive way on the west side. In the driveway, near the street, three, or four children were playing. Hp heard one of the children crying, and looking up, saw the car of Hiss Mitchell, as it came into view on the west side of his house. Miss Mitchell was driving west. At al- most the same instant that he saw ;l.e car, Mr. Swanson said that he saw the little Bombara girl start to run across the street. She was running diagonally, that is in a westerly direction, and ran directly n front of the car. He did not see ler actually struck, as a fence ob- (Contlnned On Patfe Ten) With an exemplary class of 75 new Elks initiated into the order hi his presence, and with two noteworthy addresses of Elkdom left behind, Grand Exalted Ruler Lawrence H. Rupp of the Benev- olent and Protective Order of Elks, the honor guest Tuesday of close to 800 Elks from the northwestern Pennsylvania dis- trict, left this morning- for a sim- ilar testimonial affair at Kittan- ning tonight. District Deputy Grand Exalted Ruler Clarence O. Morris of the cen- tral west district, which section plays host headed the delegation vhlch escorted the supreme chief to ;he Armstrong county city. Notable Success. Last night's festivities for the grand exalted ruler, the first such celebration sponsored by the north- western district lodges in a decade, proved far more successful than leaders of the district had even an- hjghJy__siEniflcant_ inas- much as trie highest officers 'in all of Elkdom participated in it. Besides Mr. Rupp there was Grand (Continued On Pare Ten) Officials Hope For Solution In Slaying Of Girl Renew Hope Slayer Of Vir- ginia Brooks Will Be Found By JAMES L. KILGALLEN International Netri Service Staff Correepondent (Copyright, 1931. by International News Service.) NEW YORK, Mar. the word at Tammany Hall. Frank John F. Curry, Tam- many's "big; right down to the precinct captains, a strict policy of silence has been adopt- ed toward the action of the Re- publican-controlled state legisla- ture in voting an Investigation of the alleged "corrupt" ffovern- ment of New York City. Pending the return of their spokes- Mayor Walker, from Ills vacation. In sunny California, none of Tammany's "big shots" are "going off the reservation" with statements of any kind. The firing In the counter-attack may break loose at any time but just now----- Deadly Silent. Curry is mum. Absolutely. This an International News Service re- porter found upon visiting him in the wigwam today. Neither is John H. McCooey, Democratic boss of Brooklyn, doing any talking. Nor the acting mayor, Joseph V. McKce. If the Republicans have dazed the Democratic leaders of New York City, the latter are keeping the fact well concealed. As one observer put it: "They all h'ave plasters over their mouths." "Business as usual" is the "front" Tammany is putting on, no matter vhat is transpiring back of the (Contmnid On Two) Big Gain Shown In Job Awards During Month Contracts Involving Reported In 12 Days In March CORPORATION HEAD TELLS OF INCREASE Lower Construction Costs Gives Big Impetus To Contract Letting In U. S. State Contends Martin Hired In Potter Slaying Cleveland Prosecutor. Opens Case Again "Pittsburgh Hymie" Martin WILL BASE CASE ON SINGLE KEY "Crime Well Prosecutor Evidence Is Ap- parent STAGE LOVERS TO BE MARRIED LETTER REVEALS KILLER AT LARGE 'MurdeB Trunk" Being Thoroughly Inspected For Finger Prints (Intcrnatlonn.1 News Service) SAN DIEGO, Calif.. Mar.... Fresh developments in the search for the murderer of 10-year-old Vlr- Brooks, a San Diego school ;irl today gave authorities new hope of solving the baffling murder mys- ;ery. The "murder trunk" which is be- ieved to have concealed the girl's dismembered body for more than hree weeks before the remains were ound, was being minutely examined oday for finger prints of the slayer. The old trunk was found on a dike 0 miles south of hero with a baby arriage on which was a note which ead: "This is the property of Virginia Brooks." A Los Angeles newspaper has (Oontmned On Page Two) (International Newa Service) CLEVELAND, O., Mar. "Pittsburgh Hj-mie" Martin was liircd lo aid in tbc plot to mur- der former Councilman William E. Potter, County Prosecutor Kay T. Miller charged in his opening statements made before the jury hearing the first decree murder trial of Martin in criminal court here today. "T.-.e state will produce evidence to show that Martin was brought from Pittsburgh to'plan the murder of Potter and that Martin was one j of the hired Miller de- clared. Key is Clue. Miller stated that the state "will base "its attempt to convict Martin on a single key. The key, he said, found in the lock of the apartment door when Potter's body was dis- covered last February 8, was the one which had been given Martin by Fred C. Laub. custodian cf the apartment building, "Circumstances produced in the evidence to be presented by the state will point directly to Hyman Martin (Continued On Two) WILL ROGERS of water has collected. Autos going Lima today after (Continued Oa Two) Daily Weather Report U. S. weather bureau statistics for the 24 hour period ending at 9 o'clock this morning follow: Maximum temperature. 49. Minimum temperature, 37. Precipitation .31 inches. River stage 6.5 feet. tempt to upset the government col- lapsed before the onslaught of Loyal troops, who killed between 40 and 50 rebellious soldiers. Scores were wounded in the bitter fighting, which scattered the gay streets throngs and spread panic throughout the city. One report said 200 soldiers were killed, but this could not be substantiated. Government officials declared the revolt was instigated b: communis- tic elements among the soldiery and was apparently led by non-commis- j sioned officers of the Fifth Infantry regiment. Many of them were ai1- rested and wil] be courlmartialed. the quotient is the number of votes needed to win a place. Each voter marks his first, second, third and (Continued On Two) DEATH RECORD Ruth Snydcr, 22, Willow Grove. Mrs. Vera F. Trlplclt, 49, 812 West Grant street. William Barrett. 29. Tcmplcton. Charles L. Kuby, C7, New Wilm- ington, Fa. Capital Punishment To Remain In State (From News Bureau) (State Cnplliil) HARRISBTJRG, Mar. Capital punishment will not be abolished in Pennsylvania in this session of the legislature. The Tur- ner bill, which would abolish the death penalty, is definitely dead in the committee on judiciary general, the committee being unanimously against reporting it out with an affirmative recommendation. Back of the drive to abolish cap- ital punishment is the execution of Irene Schroeder. The fact that a woman was executed for the murder of a state officer prompted spon- sors of such legislation to present the bill, feeling that there would be a feeling that women should not be executed. A public hearing was held in the matter and the Scroeder execution was discussed at it, After the hear- ing the bill was acted upon in exec- utive session and the committee turned thumbs down on the idea. The sponsor of the bill to abolish capital punishment, Ellwoc-d J, Turner of Chester, Pa., is also the sponsor of the whipping post bill. He comes from Delaware county, the home of Judge Albert Dutton McDade, who first suggested the re- turn to the whipping post for crime in Pennsylvania. Judge McDade is a former state senator from Dela- ware county and at his suggestion Mr. Turner Introduced his bill. It also is in committee and will probably remain there from now on until the session is adjourned. (Special To The News) BEVERLY HILLS, Cal, Mar. have often thought my friend, O. 0. Mclutyre, gave more space in his column to his little dog than I do to the United Stales Senate. But Hi just shmcs "Odd" knows hitman nature better than do. He knows that every- body at heart loves a dog. While I have to try and make converts to the senate. In London, five years ago, old L'ord Dewar, a great humorist and character and the biggest whisky maker in the world, gave our children a little white dog saying, "II this dog knew how well he was tired he wouldn't speak to any o] us." We have petted him. com- plained at him, called him a nuisance, but when we buried Iii7ii yesterday, we couldn't think of a wrong thing he had ever done. His bravery was his un- doing. He lost to a rattlesnake, but his face was toward him. Yours, By DAVID P. SENTNER International Xewe Service Staff Correipondent CGopyright, 1931, By International News Service) NEW YOKE, Mar. Old Man Depression should get ready to take it on the chin according to new- ly revealed building contract figures throughout the na- tion. A gain of 46 per cent in the daily rate of building contracts for March over February has been re- corded. 2 The fact that the private in- terests are beginning to expend for building projects indicates a return to confidence in ihe outlook for business. Numerous million dollar building projects undertaken within the past few weeks indicate a definite stars toward better times. L. Seth Schnit- man, chief statistician for F. W. Dodge Corporation, declared today in an exclusive interview with In- ternational News Service. S1S7.000.000 In Contracts "For the first twelve business days of March contracts of all des- j criptions in 37 states east of the Rocky Mountains total said Schnitman. "This was at die rate of per day. In the preceding month, the daily rate of contracting was only S10.700.0CO. "The gain of 46 per cent in the daily rate for March over February is much greater than the normal (Continued On Tlgt Two) Gandhi Attacked By Indian Youth Aged Follower Of Mahatma Gandhi Rushes In And Saves 'Holy Man' Helen Gahagan, New York act- ress, above, has chosen Easter Day for her marriage to her leading man, Melvyn Douglas. Both arc promin- ent in the theater, Illl NfMeuil flMlMfelH, Mayor Mer To Leave California Mayor Walker Will Go Back- To New York City To Fight Charges TAMMANY CHIEFS MAP OUT DEFENSE Newi Service! NEW YORK. Mar. While Tammany chiefs, facing a long leg- islative investigation of the city gov- e1 nment in all its branches, mapped out a defense today, it was reported that Mayor James J, Walker will return almost immediately from California. The executive, it was said here, will leave Pnlm Springs, where he is on a vacation, on Sun- five days earlier than he had planned. Samuel Seabirry, scheduled to be counsel for the legislative investiga- tors, planned to hurry to a close two investigations '10 is nov conducting. These are the Inquiry into the fit- ness of District Attorney Grain and the appellate division's probe of magistrates courts. The Intter In- quiry may be concluded by Mny 1 and the Grain investigation possibly before that time. Elmer Tlnstman. West Moody ave- nue, Is a business visitor in Wam- pum t'cday. News Service) KARACHI, India, Mar. 60- year old followed of Mahatrua M. K. Gandhi today warded off the blow from the butt-end of a black flag aimed at the "holy man" by a mem- tv of the Indian Youth's league, which staged a hostile demonstra- tion when the Nationalist leader and his party arrived at Mallr Station. 11 miles from here. The youth leaped forward to strike Gandhi, but white haired Pundit Malaviya rushed in between and frustrated the attack. I: wns the first attempt to Inflict physical injury on Gandhi since he launched thj civil disobedience campaign hich secured the present peace compromise from Britain. Arthur Mometcr Won't be long till the ball games start, won't be long till they play, for weather like this seems to urge it on, it's 45 today, And the death rate 0! grandmothers, you can ex- pect, will mount as the days gc warm, they never pass out when the u'eathcr is cold, or the ball game is spoiled with a storm. But ;ws( let the sunshine commence to pout down, and the office boy starts in .c grieve, Jor the funeral will be at the baseball ynrd. and the laa simply has to leai'e.   

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