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New Castle News Newspaper Archive: December 19, 1922 - Page 1

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Location: New Castle, Pennsylvania

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   New Castle News (Newspaper) - December 19, 1922, New Castle, Pennsylvania                               BELL PHPNEtl 22 ISO. CITIZENS PHONE 22. Telephone Your to New Castie'3 Newsy Newspaper NEW OLUMN No. 105 NEW CASTLE, PA., TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1922-. -26 PAGES. Weather Forecast Fair and warmer toniKht: Wednes- day: probably local snows. THREE CENTS A COPY IRISH EXECUTE 7 PRISONERS Prisoners Claim Powell Acted As Though Demented Several Inmates Describe Ac- tions Of Powell, Slayer Of Bmnen. MRS. BRUNEN RELATES DUEL WITH HUSBAND Knause Declares Daughter Of Brunen Expessed Sorrow For Mohr. (International News MOUNT HOLLY, M. J., Dec. -l gates of the -state peni- tentiary at Trenton opened today to provide new actors in the grim drama being played in the county courthouse here. Krnest Mayo, serving a life sentence for the murder of a jitney driver, testified Cor the defense in the trial of Mrs. Dorts Brunen and her brother, Harry C. Mohr. on a charge of murder in connection with the shooting to death last March of "Honest" John Brunen, wealthy cir- cus owner. Mayo, knew Charles M. Powell, confessed slayer of Brunen. He said Powell talked like a maniac. "He would bark like a the convict declared, "and holler 'Don't bother me, I'm on the bath tub'.1 He would not speak to me. He just shook hands and said nothing." Grover Duncan, also cnflned in state's prison, said he was in the jail here last May nnd -.heard Powell "holler and yell." "Under Bath "He would cry 'Hip, hip! Here I On Cantatas, Pageia Feature Christmas Plans In Churches TRIES DEATH TO PUNISH HIMSEL AGED WOMAN BELIEVED SLAIN Mrs. Catherine Barbel, 31, Is Found Bead, Lying In Pool of Blood (International News Sorvlcc) BUTLER, M, J-. DOC. 1M -nothing torn and her lace and body covered with blood, the body ot Mis, Catherine Burbel, 51 yoara old, was found ivlne face downward In a val- ley road here early today. Police and the prosecutor's office, co-operating in the investigation, believe she was murdered.. She lived with hus- band and children, near ;vhere her body was found. Brakeman Is Killed By Fall Under Cars Joseph Boczar of South New Castle Borough Meets On Pennsylvania Joseph Boczar. aged 20 years, ot South New Castle Boro, a brakeman on the Pennsylvania railroad died Monday evening at in tha bne- nango Valley hospital as the result, of injuries which he received when struck by a train near Leegburg yes- ?erdtv afternoon. He was removed in Offutfs ambulance to the hospital where he died a few hours later. Deceased survived by his par- ents. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Boczar of South New Castle Boro, two brothers, John and Edward, and two sisters, Julia and Frances, Funeral services will be held Wed- nesday morning at nine o'clock from St Mary's Polish church. Inter- ment in St. Mary's cemetery. Many Entertainments And Presentations Of Sacred Music Are Arranged. Programs Are Outlined For Many Of Churches Of New Castle. Cantata, pugcant and miscel- laneous projfrmnx of and recitations ivil combine with tho White Gift; service in procluim- Ing the Yulctido in churches ot this city. The celebration be- Klns Thursday of tills week when Kcrerul churches wil Rlvc their programs and will con- tinno through to the now year. The popular entertainment on Sunday will be tho cantata. Children's programs including .Santa Cluus and the Christmas tree will form an important part of the holiday celebration in the churches: The following are some programs that will TJS given: Third United day evening, Deee'mbe'r 24. at o'clock the cantata "In Bethlehem will be given under the direction of the choir leader David Lewis. On Tuesday evening at a program will be presented by the Sunday school dtrwtinent followed by the White Gift service. Songs, orchestral dialogue will mak.e up'the entertainm-jnt with some 100 child- ren of the department taking part. The committee in charge is Mrs. S. T. Hoover, Mrs. G. G. Orr, Mrs. John O'Neil, Mrs. Clark Paulson and Mrs. Mary Pattoc. Second United Friday, December 29 a miscellaneous program 'and the White Gift service will be .given in -the-Secoud -United Presbyterian church. About one hun- dred children of the Sunday school will take part in the program- of songs, recitations and dialogues. C. Is chair mac of the com- mittee and being assisted by Mrs. W. J. Mrs. Roy A, Long and Miss Esther Wagner, Fourth Presbyterian Thursday On Two) MINTBANDrcT NOIYET TAKEN Countryside Being Combed For Denver Queen Interrogated (International News Service) DENVER, Col.. hundreds of police, secret service men. and private detectives combing the countryside within a- radius of 200 miles 'of. Denver all night, no j definite clues had been discovered early today by the four daring bandits 'who robbed a Federal Reserve bank I truck of in currency in j front of the Denver mint yesterday land fatally shot one guard and caped with one of their number wounded from a iiail of bullets from scores of i rifles and revolvers In the hands of mint employes. Hundreds of telephono reports from rthe surrounding country came to police headquarters that the bandits had been seisn. One arrest: was made and Eva Lewis, former "queen" of a notorious bandit gang, was Inter- viewed, but with no results. (Jntarnatlonnl News Service) CLEVELAND, Dec. Tumey, 40., wuu ratally-burned-early- today- who.ii -a lighted cigarette set lire to bedclothing: Loss estimat- ed at caused by another fire which deiitroyed a building in Centrnl Market occupied by live com- mission houses. Three thousand six hundred fowls were Incinerated. America Has Not .Acted Scotland Yd On ban Toward Europe Investigating Ash-Car} Bomb Sir Auckland Geddes Transmits In- forination For Guidance of British Diplomats By M. CHURCH, otTMp  Defense Offers Testimony At Little liy HAXIKI. OTOXXKI.I-. Stiff DUBLIN, Dec. Republican irregular prison- ers were executed at Mount Joy prison this morning by tho Irish Free State g-overnment. The men executed -were for- mer railway workers. They were arrested near Kildare. a fortnight ago, for tearing up rails and threatening to wreck I tiains. j "The condemned men were tried by I secret Courtmartiai, just as the other irregulars had been tried who were 1 previously executed. The specifii; 'charge against them was that they j had in their possession weapons for I purpose of rebellion and against the law of the Free State. Some of C Continued On State Police Hunt For Bam Burners ar> death of Walts'- Weir, retired at noon Seven More Barns Xear Philadelphia The jury in the case against Joel Spinelli, charged with .involuntary! as a result of the to consider a verdict, not been made as to Report had the verdict when court convened this afternoon. Fjred Mgrht Apparently Thomas W. Dickey, j attorney for the defendant, felt that! "the case was not well founded for' ornng, .c jyniciii "i Shelenk was tried on Friday and (appeared fo: Saturday of last week for selling toxica.ting liquors -and the jury re- turned a verdict of not guilty and directed that the countynay the costs The verdict so incensed Judge Emery (International Service) PHILADELPHIA, Deo. 19.----Seven ___ ___ more barns burned in ten hours last before opening his side he asked that and early today, in the myste- rious campaign of incendiarism in ol Montgomery and Chester counties. 'the i sent 300 state policement scour- voluntary manslaughter. This the sid Ior Ihe lerror. judge did, mak.ng the charge an i thirty-eight barns voluntary manslaughter. Jn Qctober- with a losg Only Witness 1-or Hmiseii Qv. totaling more than Spinelli was the only witness who the judge withdraw from the jury th first count in the indictment, that of the defense. He ad- that he rebuked the jurors. The barns burned last night and were those of the Gulph Mills :lub, near Conshohocken. the of where Weir fell, tfn the ingut 01, Chester State Normal school, 20. but stated that he did j TVestchester; Perkromen junction, not see Weir fall, and denied abso- West _MOrton. LandsJale. Wyndmoor lutelv that he had pushed him His and h gt_ home for men. t _ .1 ___- ed for the delense. au- were tho to having been in the vicinity jGoK" nea re Weir the night of Chester i n. 11 V> udge Jimery iutely that ne naa pusucu and st. igatius home for men. rs. testimony occupied but. 30 minutes xorristown .The loss from those fires Mrs Mary Shelenk. wife the defense rested. Attorney -s S10o.ooo. Shelenk, is.to be tried this week on1 a similar charge. it II LI Dickey fcut 15 minutes Earthquake Shocks Felt In Montana S100.000. At Conshohocken shots were ex- changed between the incendiaries and pursuers. The arsonists were two white men and a negro, who fled in .1 Rhodes argueo. inai a The white men held 1 ference to the condition of W eir after attaches of i fVia cull a snirit that was not. Y--A... j plea to the jury. In his plea to the jury lor the commonwealth Attorney James .I Rhodes argued that Spir.elli s mdif- (International News Service) HELENA. Mont., Dec. earthquake shocks were felt in Great Palls and Missoula, Mont., late last night acordmg to reports here to- day. No damage was done. the golf club. <3uinelli was flri-nS from behind a bunker, till the 'nviUliu-hter nesro chauffer got the car into posi- gumy 'lion for flighi. inasmuch as he had pushed eir. he had fallen, and death had resulted. The case started Monday morning. December IS, and finished today at noon. Joseph Boczar, 38, South New Castle boro. 'Harry Dennis, 5, Stanton nnc: I Marriage Licenses Wm S. New Castle I Elizabeth Hlttenburger. New Castle Ralph -Martin..........New Castle i Roselee Gallagher .-----New Castle Henry A. Buckhiiir, .-Greenville Katherine C. Gallagher. .Toronto, O. Leo G. Bircb....... -New Castle .LJWU .........-v- Carrie RoDinaon -New Caetle Pilsudski Controls Polish Situation Pil- sudski. former chief of the Polish State, is in complete control ot the situation in Poland as dictator, the British foreign office was advised to- j called His Two Bail Bonds Are Forfeited da.y. Two bonds v.-ere forfeited this .morning in court before Judge S. Pluromer Emery. The first was that of Mary Kalotkovic charged with selling liquor. Mrs. Kalotkovic gavp bail jn the amount of As she did not appear the bail is forfeit- ed. Charles 3. Rose charged with em- did' not when bond of is for- feited. Local Men Recall Christmas Gifts Of Their Youth Snapshots At News T tried to think of every one whom J should fend a card, I'fe bought u bnlo of tinseled things by the yard, HJid all cards wiys -same to you" tn piuldwl colorotl ter, the whole thiiig'w i-OMt me plenty cash, ten cents 11 piece "nd batter. Ttut yet I know or think I do. no iimt- ter whnt I'vo I'll vriike up Chrlfitnuia mom and think of xf.mcone I've forgotton. Soinn I should have ciuxl- Itoarrl' Unt display, hut li'll forget, 1 ..eel I will, it's toduy. What did you get'for Christmas? Those are the days of abundance, when n. great ma.ny persons are .so accustomed to.having .their every wish gratified that it Is almost im- possible to realize that only a few years ago the boys and girls receiv- ed but few presents, thet there -were only a few kinds, of candy and toys made and that money waa scarce and therefore it was the custom to do without. Several businea men and others of our citizens have Informed The News man when he was talk- ing to them what uome of the things wore that they received for vnrist" mas when they were boys or some relating to the time then Sauta-Claus comee to good boys and blrla. Here we go: Ed Rhinohart, the ve-eran Pennsyl- vania lines employe, nays that.one of the best toys he ever received was a "jumping Jack." W. A. Stone, freight agent, P. L. E; R. R. thought the "pulse; warm- ers" he received long ago was the best ever. K. TJ. KiiKliNli the Walnut utreet grocer reca.lln with pleasure the sled ho got on ChribtmaB in the ago. O. r. Brown liked anything that would run and 'a nolso uud he hud the time of his life runiinu ita- tionary steam engine that came his way on Christmas. C. T. Motxler thought a. whole lot of e lead toy bird ;that 'could be used for a whistle, 8. A. Mayors lived on and made his own Christmas sled. Frank Espy the village blacksmith ironed it and Smithy says it would run like the wind. Thomas I. Dodds retired employe; of the Shenango tin mill says 'that he always hung up stockings for candy and nutg bui: can remember getting a kn.lt woc.l scarf about one yard long to wrap about his -neck back In the clays when they were stylish. R. M. Hairier bellieved In Santa Glaus and got a new sled, Alva Li. I'orter, city controller al- wayg looked for Santa Glaus to come down the big wood fire place. He UBU-. ally got somo and candy but not enough to make him sick. He re- olted "You may have the world.and all Its applause, Ivit give mo the childish faith In Snuta 8. 8, PuUei-Non, blacksmith on Grove street guys he spent his young dayii on a farm near North Liborty. They aid no.t have a tree on Christ- doughnuts and candy which his mother baked up a lot of father for the doughnuts and pies and his brought home some .candy family. R. X. McBumey of the National Bank of Lawrence county can recall getting a drtm. He took it outside Into the frosty air and knocked the head ou the very first lick he gave it with the drum sticks, D. G. Ramsey Bald his mother al- ways prepared an extra feed on Chrlitmas and they thought the doughlnuU were- just fine. George SwUher, mail carrier, fiays: There were six children In our fam- ily and we all hung up our stockings on Christmas eve. One Christmas morning, when we were ali busy examining the things Santa Claus tad left us, father Just took his stocking, which was filled with good things, ftijid-Lung It up on nail high up near the colling. We ate ours, then started in on nig through a little hole in the toe which became larged and larger until the stocking was empty. 3. Doan and hie brother laaac were rained out r.'bout Harlansburg. They never failed to hang up their stockings and ivfire tickled with the rolled out next morning. Wallace J. Ewing could hardly contain himself when he got a tin fife on Christmas morning. Dr. G. W. Hunt, of Croton avenue, got an old-fathioned hobby horse and wonders to this day how old Santa Claus' got it down the chimney. E. E. Seavy found a pair of new wool stockings knit by his mother, hung; up ji'enr- his old ones and oh joy! they wore filled plumb full of candy and nuts. Charlie Shaffer, at the P. L. E. freight station, was "in to clear" when, he rubbed his eyes open on morning and, found that hia stocking was filled with good things f.nd a little ABC book stick- ing out of'the top. Some book! Cunningham, the Lumber ,man, had the timo of hia life with "one ot them devils in the band- box." Jusi push the latch, the Hd would -fly open and up would jump old Mary Ann witu a loud It was a scarey thing but wore out too soon. J. H. Carroll, agent Erie R. R-, had to play Santa for the younger chil- dren in the home owing to the father being severely injured. He gave the) lu me fires to start, then i.nd they are warm and glo.wing now, W. A. IL-ovc reached the p4nuaclc when Santa Claus brouglu him that tia horse on wheels that he could move about with a string. Mike Morrissey. conductor on the, Pennsylvania lines, got a new sled, j He high-balled to the top of Rocky Spring Hill at New Galilee where the family lived at that time, and coasted down about two miles. Those were, the" days when boys had the choice of hills on which to coast. J'. B. McCIaren was pleased to Ihe jumping up nnd down point when his Aunt Mary Mayne presented him ou Christmas with a pair of red and drab mittens, about an inch thick, that she had knit.. R. H. McCann was visited by old Santa in that same characteristic manner .of his, regular secret stuff, and tho find next morning was a pair or red t-jp-ped boots with copper t 'OS. The tops were embellished with the picture of a very wild horso, Sect Paisley and his brother Andy, the Pennsylvania veteran, never fail- ed to hang.up their stockings, and On Two} W. H. West, wanted at ingion, O.. on a charge of takinft funds from sii American Legion post after putting on a benefit perform- ance, was arrested yesterday at Galli- polis, O. Seven moonshine- stills on one farm were- discovered by federal ajecnts near Short W. Va. The stills had a daily of between 4O and SO William Johnson, negro, was seu- U-m-txl to O years in the penitentiary for the killing of Mendall Stein, a Freedom. Pa., merchant. He was convicted at Beaver last. week. Baldwin Hour mill, one of the land- marks oV YounjssirVwn, was burned tho ground yesterday, causing a loss of JSOO.OOO- Spontaneous combust ioii eausetl iljo Mar.e, Richard ,1. Castle. SO years old, timekeeper, shot and killed himse'' in a boai-ding house at Coshoeton, O., last night. "Jfo cause is known for the act, Over live teachers are in at the Butler county tcacho-s" institute is in session at this week, HarJc-y of Clarion is on trisl at Kut.ler this week on a charge of hvTolmitary manslanKliter. His auto struck a motoreyclo ridden by Her- bert Titcsdalc, who was killed.   

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