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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: December 16, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - December 16, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAK-NO. 246. lOGK HAVEN, PA., TUESDAY. DECEMBER 16, 1890. PKICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPBESS KIVSIAB BBOTHKBS - - - FVBUBHKBS	 TBK WK&TBEB. Tht followioc foraout of the wmther ii fainlatatd b; tha Chief BtftDil OlBoer mt Wuhtncton: FaiMuttiU8s.m. WedDwd*;: Soov mod warmer.	 	SNOW 	 Fnaam notice. The funeral of T. C. Kintzing will take plaoa Tharadar afternooo.  Funeral aerT-loM will be oonduoted at the familf reai-dence, 208 Weat Main atreet, at 3 o'otOBk. At tke Open Booae. The (afoinaiiaa of the Moore and Vir-Ian oompuiy at tha Opera Honae laat night oan ba lammad np ia a vmtj tew woidf. a fair ahow and a fair alzed andieoaa. �uTied. Attha.Kaat Hain atreet X. E.peraonage Deaemberl5, 1890, at 6:30 pm. by the ReT. B. B. Erana, William E. Withee and Arlina Dell HiUer, both of Eaat Bald Eagle atreet. thia eity. AU Fiaaaat Bat Tbiw. There are bnt three of the teashera of Clintw oonnt; who are not attending the Inetitbta this week. Two of the abaent ooea who ara werj aiok are Mia* Jocea, of BenoTo, and Miaa FUher, of thla eity. DaaoT In lee. ' People who out ice on the rinr and atore it away for naa next anmmer abonld aec to it that their ioa ia not oat too near tha Look Haven ahore. There ara large aewera emptying into the river at many plasa^ In the city, and ice oat near the aawara woald not be pleaaant to nae if sot poaitlrely dangaroua. BeUef Oarp Olllcaia. Bnektail Poat Woman'a Relief Corpa at BcnoTO baa elected the following olBaera: S. Y. Fieaident, Hra. F. Hoke: J. T. Prea-ideat, Uia. N. Bowara; Treaanrer, Mra. N. Fleming; Chaplain, Hra. S. Croaa; Con-dnetor, Hra. H. Hinehan; Guard, Hi*. A, LeaUa; Dalagatab Hra. N. FlamioR; Alternate, Un. H.CrOH. BiUotias FarXeaalian. The ballota eaat tor the mo�t popnlar teaehera in the oonteat at Renovo for the Murphy organ progreaaea Duely. Miea Agaee Marr Uada io the eontett baring raoeiTed op to laat Saturday evening 11.536 votea. Hiaa Hollie MoCann ia seo-ond IB tha raae with 11,217 to her eredit. Other leaden are Miaaee Mary Lafferty, Harna Dieifanbaob, Joie Jonee and Myrtle Eandig. Fallal* at Clearll�ld. A telephone meaaage to the ExFRsee from Clearfield, at 2:15 tbia atteroooc, atataa that the Clearfield County Bank eloaed ita doora to day, the Hon. William A. Wallaea making an aa�igomacit in favor of J. N. MoCarrell, uf Harriabnrg, and AUiaon O. Smith, of Clearfield. The lia-bilitiee are aafd to be 000,000. The rea-aona aiaigned for making tha aaaignmant ara tightoeaa of the tayaej market and in-billty to obtain money to meet their obligationa. Mw. Tlaaeafa I^ctane. The following ia a taatimonial of a very miiMDt man on the leotorer who ia to be with oe Deo. 30th, Slat and Jan. lut: Sr. Gladden writea to the Young Hen'a Club of Colambna aa followa: GsHTUOIKli:-I wlah to eapreaa my panoaal gratlfioatian with yonr enterprise in ecoarinK the acrvioea of Mr. Leon H. Tineent aa lecturer^ I beard, laat aum-�err two of the four leeturea of the aontaa he ie to give yon; and oan bear ' taatlmony totbeir cxcallenoe. Mr. Tineent ia atill quite yonnib bnt he ia a thorough student of English literature, "a ftaah and piquant writer,.and a wiunine apeaker. He inveata the aubjeota of bis laoturaa with the acmoaphere of reality; lie telle yon the thinge about them that yon aoat want to know, and he helps you to anjoy their work.  All thoee who are ' atndyiDg or teaehiog Eogliah literature will oertaloly be entertained and profited by lialanlng to tbeae Icotnies. Very traly youta, Wasbinotok OuoDEa. CoLUXBDS, Feb. 12, 1887. THE DEATH OF SITTING BULL He tiai His Son Killed In an Enconnter frith Indian PoUce. HASD riaHT ON TH� GBAUDE BIVES I of Look Haven .The Rev. J. Patton Moore adminiatered tbe aaorament of the Lord*a Sniper to him on Sunday morning, no one thinking that death was ao near. The funeral will uke place on Wednea. day afternoon, at 2 p'olook, interment to made io Fairview oemetery, Paddy'* Rnn. Rev. Moore will oonduot the funeral aerv-ioea. The iBdJsa Police ArreU SltUaE Ball, ud Duriaa an Attempted Bcicae the Old GUerand Bla Son Orewroot Are KIIM-Batraol Othera Meat Death, ladndlnE FIT* of the Beat Indian Police. 8t. Paul, Deo. 15.-News was received here thla evening of the killing of Bitting hull dating a fight with the Indiaii police to.day. The newe baa been oohfirmad by ad-vicea reaeived by General Miles, at the military headqaartera in thir city. He received two diapatbhea thia evening, the first from Pierre,- Bottth Dakota, auting that Sitting Bull and hie son bad been killed, but giving no lurther particalars. The other dispatch was from Staodiug Rock agency, and etated that the Indian police started out this morning to arrest Sitting Bull, having understood that he proposed starting for tha Bad Lands at once. The police were followed by the troop of cavalry under Captain Fonohar, atid infantry under Colonel Drum. When the police reached Sitting Ball's camp on Grand river, aboat forty miles from Standing Rook, they found arrangements being made for a departure. The cavalry had not yet reached the camp, when the poliee arrested Sitting Bull and started back with him. His followers qaiokly rallied to.his rescue and tried to retake him. la the melee that ensued the wily old chief ia said to have been killed, aad firs of the bs3t of the Indian pDlics were also killed-One of the police jamped on oae of Sitting Bull'a Hones, and rode back to the cav-alary and infantry, telling them to bnrr.r to the support of the police, and then harried to the agency with ;;tbe news of the battle. the news at washisotok. Washisbton, Doc. 15.-Indian Cuai-missioner Morgan received this evening from Indian Agent HoLaugblio, the following dispatch,'dated Fott Tites, N. D., December 15: The Indian police arrested Sitting Ball at his camp this morning at daybreak. B.U followers attempted a rescue, and fighting cammsnced. Four policemen were killed and three wounded. Eight Indians were killed, inolading Sit. ting Bull and bis son. Crowfoot, and several others wounded. The police wore surrounded for some time, but malntaioed their ground until relieved by the United States troops, who noir have possesBlon ot Sitting Ball's eamp, with all the womoo, oUildren and property. Sitting Bull's followers, probably one hundred men, deserted their familiea and fied west np the Grand River. The polios behaved oobly, and great credit is due them,- Commissioner Morgan shotred this telegram t� tha Fieaident this eveiiing. The President said that be bad regarded Sitting Bull as a great disturbiug elemeut in his tribe, and now that he wasi, ;Out of the way he hoped that a settlemeuC of the diffioalty could be renewed without biood-shed. the end op the tbou'ble near. General Schofield this alteraoan' received two telegrams from GeueraK'RuiZer, commanding the department of Dakota, in one of which be says ha hopes to get in all the Indians who turned back from ibe Bad Lands. Tno Strikes party are trying to induce them to come along with them. He says that the Indians are moving slowly on account of poor stock. The otter telegram includes a dispitoh ractiived yesterday from the commandiDg officer at Gelricbs, Dakots, saying that his interpreter just io from White river reports that fifty lodges in the Bad Lands are trying to walk their way north to the Cheyenne Rirer Agency. General Roger adds that necessary steps have been taken to intercept them if possible. maoBAi. vKsciuBaB. Uiu Agntia HcCabe has accepted a po-aitioB aa atanographar and type writer in the law office of T. C. Uippla, Eeq. Kias Anna Lay ia at home from Carroll, when aha ia taMbIng aobool, to attend tha Inatltata and Co spend her vacation. Fnr. CoDgbllD will teotara at Williams-port to-nlfht before tha Lyeoming County Inatitnta bat will ratarn to this city to-Borrow. Mr. and Mrs. Jared P. Huling and wife of Bic Rapids, Hlobigan, afur a brief vifit with friends in thia city returned to Jeiaay Bhora and in a few daya will leave for their home in Michigan. J. T. Ctyder, of Flamington, ia eerlonsly - ill with poanmonia, bat hla friends ara hopafol .today of hia reeoTary. His ftthar, Etmmil brjin, of Kaatiog, U at TlaalqctoB I* iMdatUi to amrortbe pie^|iSifc^.:H,..;K>;-Bs;,;vj:V-.i^ : DJMth of WllUsm Harper, at Rodovo. Captain William O. Harper died suddenly at Renovo, yesterday aiternoun, about 1:30 o'clock. Arrangemeuia bad been made to tako bim to a hospital in Philadelphia, on Erie Mail last nigtat^ - He has been confined to bis home for the pist three veaks by disease of the bonuls and lungs. Be was in the fifty eighth year of his age, having been born in Centre couoty, February 8th, 1833. He enlisted in the 49tb Regiment at the breaking out of the rsbelllon, and after serving some time, sent in his resignation on account of a disagreement with the Colonel of the regiment, and returned home to immediately re-enlist in the 148tb Regiment (Col, BeaTer's, now Governor) in wbloh be served until the end of the rebellion. He came to Reoovo shout twenty years ago, and obtained a situation in the car dopartmept, which ho held up to bis death. Be was highly respected by his felloir-workmea, aod was an bOBorable cUizen. He leaves a wife and algbt abildran to mourii their loss- tbraa ^ataaaiHl BTe-daagbters, three of wliiiih an B�aiiW,^oMAaber Tto^ A Throo Years* X.rave of Aheiaee. The Saobury Dailtf says: "Thera is no better knowu railroad conductor thail Sam'l Keller. At the laat eleetion he was elected Sheriff of Dauphin county. That county nsually gives ahont 2,000 Republican majority, but Conductor Seller wsa elected Sheriff by between eight and nine hundred. It was a great victory and tha f r jiU of it are substantial, aa a Sheriff of that county makes from seven to ten thousand a year. As soon as tha election was over Hr. Keller went back to bis pa. sitioB oil the L-ailroad and has been work, ing at it erer since. Daring the oam-paign he had a month'a leave. Hia o oial duties will oommeoce on tha first Monday ot January and will last three yeara. Mr. Keller was preparing hia resignation as conductor when an order was issued, giving him three yeara leave of absence. This is one of the longast leaves aver known to have been given by tbs railroad company. Hr. Keller was one of the old time railroad men who started hen the work of running railraada atart-ed as a business. He waa off during tha war and had a first olasa war rseord, Since that tiiha he baa been ooudaeting a train. His many fiieads along the line will wish him a suooessful term." Criminal Cw There are hundreds of^yoang . people skating upon the river these days and evenings. To prevent them from skating into tbe places from which the ioa has been cut and removed for lee housssi blocks ot ica should be set up.oii all sides of tbe spot from which the ice is taksnl To neglect to do thfvis criminal careless; nesa and may resalt in tbe drowning of somebody. , ....... loe Oattais at Work. Messrs. Mussina & Read oc tbismomiDg cutting and atpring jca.'ia their big ice' house. A number of persons ate at work cutting and filling tha crystal blocks in private ice honsaa. --^--� A ��nx*B Tfscka Seen. The tracks ot a large bear were seen yesterday betveea tbe mouotaiaa aonthof this city.  Some of Look Haven almrods sfaonld csptare the animal. Nana ahd rotbs. At the Oaart �sua M� ai�lit-BalleHn� F�Tanehsn^VaaaMat aaailaM-AII P;iaeantBnt Thiae.'Belief Corp caeaaa -Hiss riihat's CM^IUsB-Danth of Aced lAdr. There was a large andlenee at thaCoart House laat night, tba oeoaalon being tha opening night of tha loatltata laotorea and evening entertalnmanta. Praf. Meloy, of tbe Normal Sdhool. iJzUbited tbe pbano-grapb, and enterudaad'tboaapraaant wltn a number of fine aeleetiona as played by tbe Fifth Regiment band, Hia explaaa-tionswere intataatbig itnd highly enter-Ulnlag. Miss &melia Fee, tba charming young vocalist, aang aevatal aalaotloas and ber singing was,highlysiOoyabla, Bar tonea are clear and bird like, her enunciation distinct and aba singe without affectation. The enterUipment dosed with Prof. Coughlln'a lectufe im "The Legacy Wa Leave Our Cbild(an.'^ ^Prof. Coogblin la a fluent speaker, apnUng rapidly but distinctly, and be held the doea attention ofblaa^dienbeantif^ttaalaat word of bis interaatingtalk WM'iyoltaii; At the OptM'ilaiaai Ta-lln�Iit.    -Mrs. H. E. Montoa will gite bar celebrated, illostratad laotara, "A Review of the Civil War." (b-nigbt In the Open House. Think of it,. 100 Tiawa> Analbtio'and I^JirillingJakatahofJia^R^WIIicm^   ;   / Bishop John P. Newman,, IJ." S.' Aaao-ciate Jaatica D.-^r Biawar ktfd many others apeak of. dacUa^clasiibg iarma, Everybody should ooma out to bear her. MissFe* iina Kt.'Bowa'wm Mng baan-tiful aoloa for yon. ..Hisa Fee will aing "Tall Me, Baautifall Maidan," and Ifr. Rowa win alns 'IhaifllMapaat.^' Tistots oati> iwl|iiiSaltstt ft Bhyrta-stine'a or froiis Sapt^Brangard and Robb. Admission ao, S(l and 40 bants. Reeerrsd seaaon ticket for Tnesday. Wadneaday and Thursday nights 1.00;^aontaa tiokets 75 cents. A fife at Pottbtown, Penna., un Saturday morning, destroyed several baildiogs in the business centre of the town, eaus-iOK a loas estimated at from (140,000 to �170,000. A despatch from Atchison, Kansas, the Home of Becatar Ingalls, says that the Farmers' Allianse, of Atchison county, at a recent meeting, adopted resolutions recommending the retirement of Mr. In-galls from the Senate, and the election to bis seat of a Farmera' Alliance man. A bailding on Canal street, New 'Sork, was buraed Sunday. The damage suffered by Che tenants is as follows; Hsrtmsn & Mendelsohn, oloaka, (20,000; David M. Gerbar, hosiery and dry goods, (10,000; J. H. Eokhardt, jetseya and jackets, (40,000. All lOBBsa are aovored by insurance. At a birthday celebration in Buchtel College, AkroB, Ohio, on Friday night, eight girls were masks and loose flowing garments, with high hats oovered with cotton. One of the hate oanght fire and the flrtmes were oommnnicated to the entire party. Lulu Btaigmyar and Hay Steves died yeaterday from their injuriea. Word is received from Nicaragua that a new disease has appeared there and . has caused several deaths. Tbs victime are seized with severe pains in the stomach, which iDonpacitatea them. The pain is followed by dysentery and if prompt measures are not taken tbe eufferer dies within four hours. Dr. Bspenoea, of that place, considers the disease a precursor of cholera. Secretary Windom beld a oonferenee in New York on Saturday with bankera on the financial situation. A full axpranaioo of the views of the finanaiers on the financial situation, the effest of additional silver legislation and other matters was obtainad, and then tbs conference ended. It is said tbat tbs Souretary will not take any immediate action as the result of the conference. A furniture wagon, containing two.mtn and three b(j;ys, was run into by an express train ut tbe Mill street croisiog in Bristol, Pa., on Saturday evening Oiia^of the men and two of the boya on the wagon ware killed, a pedaatrlan waa *\�6 killed by dying debris,''and two others'ara dahg-e'rously injured. ' The killed' were Hugh Dever, ngrd 40 years; Joseph Hcllvaine, aged 14; Joseph Horsisy, aged 14, and Joseph jobnsoii, aged 45. In Chicago, Sonday,.a curious state of things was discovered, on the West Side Cable Road:- "Tbe freciiBg weathar lud the eOTect of Datrawing tba slot abovla the cable, through' piasjiire on eiob'alda' of tbe open subway. Tbe result was, it became too narrow in piscea for the grips to pass unolistructed and numerous trains were broaRht to a stand. To free them tbe gripmen of susoeeding trains adopted the plan of bunting them. Thle caused a lively ebakiog ap of the passengers in the stalled trains and a number of them weife more or lesH hurt. One or tiro aata were derailed, and there waa-a'general blook-' ada. � Haniltads of vnimgtn ware ooia--pellad;to,w�lk.!r.;.^ TBANSFIBIN6S OF LM. 5ew8 of Intarest for Oar Many Beadan to Penae. THE LATEST LOOAL HEVS BULLETIH FDBOBBT POT FOVBBI. I �lataee of BeBSe and Ken- The reraey MasntalB TMlais. Israel Boyar, oat af;tha viotima of the Fernay moantala-: railxoad disaster, who. Buffered kmpntttion ot one of his feat, waa able to be np town today for the first time. U� gate along nicely on hia orutcbes, and was In bad bat five days all together. .Oscar Grugaa, anotbat of tha victlma of the disaster, who suffered froin injuries to his head, is also recovering slowly. Be is still oonflued to his bed but there are no doubts of his oompleia leeovery to good health sgain. Vho Two Thieves. The people who patmaiu amusementa iu this town �e aontinnally crying for something worth sselng. They say that they are entitled to tbe, beat To prove that he is constantly trying to aecnre it for them, Hansgar Farsswortb annonnoea tbat he has secured Cdionel Biiellwaianar'a great attraction '^Tba Two Thievaa;" which will positively appear here for one night only, with Its full aetropolitsn east, Saturday, December 27tb, Pro^ioa Against Fraet. Wster Superiiitsndaot Keller ia at work to-day fixing np-tha tra plnga in such a way that tbey wlllpot be found useless if needed when aol&r weather comes. A saltbatrella sawed: Ih'halves, and one-half placed over tfie'ptng and the spsee bstween tbe barrel and the plug filled with ground'bark from the tannery. Only once before were the eaine prccantiona taken to prevent tbe water in tbe plnga ^from freezing.'' - �� ; i Death of aa Agodiadir. Vrs. Uargarat Jeaiwa died thia morn-ing, at tbs residaoce of bar aoo-in-law, Charles Cammings,  �iiild|N^ have yon given for ebnrah qaastioB yoD ailgbt wall tba year drawa to a olosa^ and eee If tba money you hava apant fool-: lebly might not bava baan battar appropriated. In aloae application to bnaioaai gets ahead of a mtutard pUatar. notUng �Fea la probably BOW la daOy naa bb _ bawita bj BMudf Hm popoUM^ A Boar's Tmeks 8Mn-At the Opoia Boi -DnagOT In le�-lae Cattm at Won PfotogUon ABBlnet Fisst-Bank to Bo Olssed-Fanoial Motlco-Tho Fonsr �onntaln Vtetlms. Tbe thirty-filth annnal aession ot tha Olinton County Teachers' Institute began ita work in the Coiirt Honae tbIa, aflar-noon, and will be aontlnuad dariiig'the week. The program is one of the best aver arranged for a o^ucty institute, em-btaeing instrnctors who ara speeialista in their respective departments. Sapt. Brangard called the assembled teachers to order, and the' lastltute waa formally opened by aingiog "Cd.aa Where tba Wild Flowers Bloom;" fol-lowed by Kev, Holienhangk who offered prayier to tbe giver of all knowledge for the eontinned sncceu of our publlo aobools. Attar singing another seleetion the In-elitata proeeeded to organize permanently by the nomination and eleetion of tbe fallowing officers: Vise PreeidentB,Profa. J. A. Robb and C. B. Kelley; Enrolling Seotatary, Prof. John P. Anthony; Per-eunent Secretary, Prof. Isaaa Bamberger; Reportieg SecreUriee, Prof, M. J. Farey and H'isa Bertha Haatellar. - -. Bupt. Brungard made a few preliml-naty remarkatu the teaehera. .Ha kindly welcomed them, to thia lastltate, -ud urged that tbey derive all.tbei^eaaare and benefit possible from it. He also insisted upon punatoality, close atteation to in-atraation and use of note booke. City Snpt. Johu A Robb waa bailed upon and responded in* fhw well ohoeen words of waleoma, aeasoned. with good advice. He ia a universal favorite with thaeonntyaa well ae the. eity teaebsrs, and they ara always glad of the opporta-bity to listen Wbim. Bupt. Brangard annoanaad the ioilow-Ing .Committee on' Resolntions: * Misaaa: Bailie Rhodes, Anae D.'atauffer,-' Carrie H. Hoar^ Ida E. Hsyers, Heaars. D. J. MoVaoI, S. Tt. Bolter and W. K. Kappler. Oommlttaa on BeaoliiUooa relaUva to tha death ot Misa Lillie Harvey: Hiaaaa Cora Snyder, Anns Oiimtno, Heme Con-ley, Hesara. J. B. Hartar and Daniel Herr. Tke Inatitnta joined in alnging laater." Prof. JamaalLiCoaghUBiOf KUigaiUni,j Fa., waa now Introdnead and gava; aa in-tisreetlng and ibstruativs Bddrasa''t<$ * tlw teacbere on "Histakee In Teaoblog." Among what lie eonsldera tha ohiet mia-takee in teaching^ be mentioiied tha na-gleot of etndylng the individuality of pn-pll�; to work for- qaantity laatead of qaslity In edacation; to nogteat; moral training In pnranitof edacation; tu regard a system aa mora Important than childhood; to attempt to make np In inatmot-ioa what is misaed by not having a oaref ol preparation for laoiution; to deal: with partlouln oaaea on general prineiples. Tbe end and purpoea of edacation ia to. place tba individnal in posseeeion of celt. His talk was replete with eonnd, aenaibla advice tbat oan be put into praotieal naa in every school room;. HissAmelUFee, of CoooellavUla, Pa.,, then eang "tf'Toa Had a Little Lotar." She poaseaSee a winning petaotiality aaid a flneiy ohltivatadvoloa. bhs has alreadj-cLarmed her andienoa by tha;manaec in which aha waa loudly encored. She ra-apondea by. singing "Kitty Tyrill." Her eln(Eltig will be ana-of the pleasantast featnrca Of tbis'lnstituta. ; Attar a ebort, pleaaant leoeaa the asar-olsea ware resiimed by singing: "Welaoiae Gentle May." Prof. A. E. Gobble now took up tha topio of "Ueatai Soiaoos." Ba aayaJt ia ona of tbe moat Important.of lha aoleuea.i It ia lieoanse It la not so familiar as mattw-: mati  Pruf. Gobble resumed hla topie of "Hen-tal Science." He defioed intalleot aa tbe power of knowing. Ha talked on "rea-eon," "consciousness," and "refleotion." After receaa Hiss Fee gave aavamlaetao-tions. %ne of them: being ^'Coaring: Thro' the Rye," by request. ^ Mr. Lloyd Smith gave a ten 'mlnnt^'a talk on the history and manufactaring of thesteelpen. " Hrs. H. E. Monroe was Introda&d-and made ber Introduetory addrOii'iiD' tba "Development of Character iii'WiPiibi lie School." The sdbool thM 'difea^'mit make the development'of ohariictfeT "tba primary object, is an injury to'-tii'rtita inateadof the benefit inteoded';''-tiM'''tliat every pupil tbat comea under '^aF"^^ nudersUnds an J appi�elatea'tbe''rea^giii-billty of bscomlog an Amerioin-^ blifisiin. She enlarged npon' tbe elemeatr"'^r ida-eesa which are energy,' Indaatryi'lcntiwl-odge and integrity. Bha pleaJiS "Tl^y atrongly tbat mora tlma 'hnd'Iiilbriat'ba given to moral and Chriatbu 'tnllblbg''ia onr pnbllo ssboole. Bha held'tb"i Hdia attention and Interest of every oAiilpreaalit, "Sewing Qo6d Sead" waa' aung^by tha Insiltnta and after a few abttslsiiiiu'lty the Superintendent, Inatitata''>kt6od adjourned until 1:S0 p. ni. 0 �KOTEs: .-'^-'i One hundred and tblrty-tbiab tisohlia werepreiwfatandenr61Iea'fi>a*y,'<'' Tbe teaehera are all antoll&lijiit' t(iiS< which u M anuaual aa it U j^tiljtag;-� 'a number of ditlBcferrfroiii^'t^Blrt^Ad county looked In'on the-prooeedlags'to-day. ' '   " - '   A Prof. W; H; Rowtf iciids theiiigiog'tliiB year and Hin Carria'MillU"praid�aiit&a organ,        �     �        � � ,i. Hiss Herrick, snperlatendant'^of'CbAi-eiun eoanty, is among the Thitora^t' tba Instltate.      ' Sapt Brangard and'#Ife�atiHalliMI'a nnmbrr of thalnsbaetoA at � tfaalir'^'boiha yeaterday.        ' - Prof, ^don and'ilarMi ntilnbei^'of lia pnpils at the Nur tli� 'anr. elies tbIa afternoon and anibmiaai'taaJb-ara. '       i"  1 Hr. Daniel Herr, wilo^)a'��olili!|i^ti8.: forty-fourth terni of' aebiio^ it' EM&a, U the Nestor Biaong'thetaikabinf'A^adBa oonnty. ' * ''f ' Tha f8mIlUrtaaaar%iaa'Aimk%liiJBr ia missed from tbs gronp Of city'tiliiBlfaia; Bha is not ableto �6 with ai th1iiV^>%n adOountoffeHonallliaeBrf; '     '''o Many of the boya- whd' tUttiittlikiiAlia the ball of the Court Hottk? Ms . dneedratsa this year.       " '3 '- ' 1-      �       -� -VJ-ii', 8al0ra, p.:. Dec^g/lSaK Twodeer weraabot iUbor T&lby ttat Tbe appearaooa of'diiir''atonks^'indl^ >^ that Chrutmaa'ls new.'- * . , R-T. Bjei, o'i the K E. oha^cl^'Uli^d. ing a m':eliDg at Lamar.'"''   Alf i � "? And now the merry "�jingVoftSa elJ&b bella U no lengerbeud onoof atn^'-     ' Ptoresior H(rr.who'fdl'f,Ja4'e$4i^ tree, July 4.h, is yet lying iu'aiu balplesaoondition.      "    ^-^---^ The ladleaof the 9oii�'u
                            

From 1607 To The Present

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