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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: November 24, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - November 24, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAB-NO. 228. LOCK HAVEN, PA., MONDAY. NOVEMBER 24. 1890. PBICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPBESS KIM8U>E BKOTHBB8 - - - f UBMSHEB8 CURRENT COMMENT. Ome hundred and forty-four votes in the ilze of the Democrstio Governor's majority in NebraBlta^__ SOMS time ago. Governor Hill, of New York, aaid be would not accept the United States Senatorskip. Now he says he is willing to take it. Thet say wealtb can purchase any tbiog in this country, but Jay Gould would not try to net the Presidential nomination of itber party. The oommeroial agencies report that general trade was little affected by tbe financial flurry. It has been noted, through it all, that small investors, iu and out of town, bava been gathering io the securities which the financiers threw away; showing that the country at large was not scared at all. It is understood that the Democrats in the Legislature ac Harrisbnrg will vote for William A. Wallace as their candidate for United States Senator. The Democrats who are now in control of the party machinery bav^ no objection to bestowing such "honors" as this on Mr. Wallace. But if there bad been a Democratic ma-jarity in the Lagislatnre, tbe Clearfield statesman would have been once more stood aside. OuBiKG the current month the Seors-tary of the Treasury purchased 4,S00,00 ounces of silver bullion under the present law. This large purchase, the largest by far ever made by the Government io the same length of time, has made no appreciable inroad on tbe supply of silver in tbe market. Instead of going up in price it has steadily declined until from $1.21 per ounce it is now soiling under a dollar. Tee attempts which have been made bere and there to organize an opposition to the re-election of 3, Donald Cameron to tbe United States Senate have thus far failed to produce any results. No other candidate has appeared in tbe field against bim, and it is not probable that any will appear who will develop any strength sufficient to impair Senator Cameron's obances of re-election. It is now more than probable that be will be his own successor for the term of six years, beginning with tbe 4tb of March, 1SS1, and it is likely that the Kopublioan Legislative caucus will be either unanimous or nearly unanimous in favoring bis retarn. The War Department has given its ap-proTal to a scheme for whish Congress will be asked to appropriate the snm of 1100,000 to carry into effect. This is to make a thorough expleration of tbe Territory of Alaska under tbe auspicss of tbe War Department. The plan aa well as tbe general details have been prepared by two officers of tbe army who have seen much service in Alaska. The plan ccn-templatei a foree of from 50 to 100 enlisted men, properly officered, besides a corps of scientists. These would take with them a saw mill and locate a settlement on the wooded banks of the great Yukon river. Here houses would be built and general headqnarters established. From this point exploration parties sonld be sent into every part of tbe Territory. A OratlfyiHC Enderssmcnt. Lock Haven Daily Democrat. Whatever may be said In regard to tbe malt of tbe Congressional contest in this district, one thing is certain, Mr, Hopkins bad tbe masses of bis own party well organized in this county and held them right to their posts, while he had a large number of personal Democratic friends who TOtid for him. This accounts for his majority In Clinton county. Wo don't believe that any other Republican in tbe district could have carried this county against Elliott, and especially when op posed by prominent leaders of his own party. Looking at the matter dispassionately and considering the really solid Democratic majority in Clinton, it was truly a somewhat remarkable personal triumph and the Cooeressmaa-el�bt has good reason to feel gratified at his endorsement by the people. INDIANS MEAN BUSINESS. Troops Prom Missouri Being Hurried to Pine Eidge Agency. PAmiES LEAVmaOH EVEEY TRAIN An Old landmark. The brick building on the Kintzing lot at tbe oorner of Main and Jay streets is being reroofed and otherwise Improved. This building is one of the land marks of the city having been erected over fifty years ago. -- � -------------- A rlne Falatloc An oil painting of "Tbe Lord's Prayer" is on exhibition at A. H. Beilman iSb Co.'s furniture warerooms on 31ain street. The painting is the production of W. George MoNeal, of Renovo, and i? (or sals. Miss Katherine Crego, the leading lady of the Waite Comedy Company, has a TOioe and asgu'etio power which obarms ber audieooes. Her emotional work is tsid to be laperb. See ber at tbe Open Boaae to-Dlgbt. All Troops in the Department of Missouri Beady to liCave For the Sceae of Action on a Moments Motlce-Two Epiicopal MisRionariiiS, Who Have Arrived at Fierra. Say That it Wonld ba Uaiafa to Remain. PiEiiBB, Nov. 23.-Two Indian Missionaries of the Episcopal obnrob, Ashley and Garrett, arrived in Pierre last night from Pine Ridge agency. They were warned by the Indians that it would not be safe for them to remain there. They report that a great many families are leaving there as fast as they can get away. It is stated that there are not seven hundred Indians on the lands recently eeded to the government, and those who are in position to speak with authority say there is no danger. THOOrS FROM UI880TJEI. St . Louis, Nov. 23.-General Merritt, Commander, this morning received instructions from Washington to send troops at once to Fine Ridge agency, the ssene of tbe Indian trouble. General Merritt accordingly ordered a regiment of the Seventh Cavalry, consisting of about 800 men under command of Colonel Forsyth, and a company of artillery with a battery of four guns, commanded by Captain Camperon, from Fort Riley, to the scene of trouble. The troops left to day by special train. General Merrit said: "I do not know how serious the trouble is, and of course cannot now say whether more troops will be sentor not. Or coursethey will be sent if necessary. I have no information further than that the orders were received from headquarters at Washington and I have acted accordingly." It is learned that every soldier in the Department of Missouri is in readineES to start for Dakota at a moment's notice. a PLOT EXPOSED. Omaha, Nov. 23.-A Pine Ridge special gives the details of a plan by which the Indians expected to ambush Qoaeral Brooke's force and kill them all. It was brought by a reliable person, wha over-beard the Indians discussing their plans, while ha pretended to be asleep in a tepee. LOOKING UP THE �VVASDEniSO ikdiasb. BisMA-RCK, N. D., Nov. 23.-To-day's advices from Standing Rock continue favorable. Rations were issued yesterday, and Agent McLaughlin reports only a small number of bucks away. The military authorities' count shows that a large number did not appear, however, and today a scouting party crossed the river to look up the wandering Indians. TO OIEIOLVE PARLIAMOTI Sallabary to Take Advautaca  or the Par-neil ticandal. LosD n, Nov. 23.-A rumor is current and is credited at the Carleton Club, and other conservative centres, that Salisbury, deeming the time opportune while the Parnell scandal is fresh in the minds of the people, has decided to dissolve Parliament in the spring. UnlplBC the Claar Indattry. The McKtnley bill was signed on tbe first of October, and during that mouth 425,000,000 cigars were manufaolured in this country and sent tomarket, asagainst 370,000,000 for October, 1389, an Inoreasc of 14.80 percent. For the previous nine months of the year the output was 1,020,-000,000, aa against 1,480,000,000 for the first nine months of 1889, an increase of 134,000, or 9 per cent. Thus the MoKiu-ley bill has been so good for cigar manufacturers as to raise their rate of increase of business from 0 per cent, to nearly 15 per cent. And this increased business means increased employment and more money for cigar makers who are willing to do more piece work. How Small Panics Stait From the New Yort Press. The old saying that "one goose makes many," w&s exemplified la the "jun" on the Citizens' Savings' Bank. A poor, foolish woman, who bad (38 on deposit there, heard that the banks were all breaking and rusbed bareheaded through the streets, with ber bank book la her hand in baste to secure her money. The crowd followed-foolish, panic-stricken, unreasoning. It was panic, the only remedy for which Is cold cash. Fortunately there is plenty of cash in this case and the depositors who got their money will soon wonder what possessed them to withdraw it. The Orlftln orihe llucktalls. Seven cities contended for tho honor of being tbebiitbplaopof Homer. Abouttbat number of men claim tbe honor of organizing tbe Die of the buck's tail on tbe caps of tbeae famoas soldiers.  At tbe reunion in Wellsboro last week tbe matter was brought up. We quote from the Agitator: "Col. S. D. Fieeman, of Smethport, who was the first surgeon of the Buok-tails, says that several erroneous statements have been published regarding the origin of the use of tbe buck's tail as a symbol for the regiment. He says that after tbe enlistment of the regiment In 1861 CapUIn W. T. Blanchard, of Company I, and Colonel Kane were discusaing the question on the streets in Smethport, Mc-Eeau county. A large deer was hanging out in front of a market opposite tbe public square. Blanchard noticed itand said, 'Why not take a buck tall ?' Kane replied, 'That's just the thing!' They went over to out the tail off that deer and the bide was cut into small pieces and put on tbe soldiers' bats. Tbe first man to wear tbe buck tail was James Landragan, of Kane. He attended the rannion last week." "Godey" for Christmas. The publishers of "Godey'l Lady's Book" promised us a real treat in the Christmas number, and nobly have they fulfilled their promise. Two frontiapieee illustrations, colored and black fashions, and work designs, illustrated stories, and good things without stint. The stories are all adapted to tbe festival season, among which are "Spanish Cousins," by Elsie Snowe; "Major Granby's Past," by Edgar Wardlaw Kendall; "Doctor Margaret," by Mary Morris; "Three Christmas Days," by Frances Button Clare; �The Knave of Hearta," by Edward Brunson Clark; "In Memory of Charles Dickens," by Ada Marie Peck; "Nile's Christmas Eve," by Olivia Lovell Wilson, etc. etc. Godey Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa.  (2.00 a year. Tbe }(aw Schednla. The new time schedule for the running of trains on the Philadelphia and Erie railroad went into effect yesterday. Hereafter all passenger trains will be designated by numbers. 'The following Is the leaving time of passenger trains from tbe main station in this city: Eastward-Train No. 14, formerly known as Sea Shore Express, 7:20 a. m.; Ko. S, formerly J>ay Express, 13 o'clock noon; No. 6 at 5:35 p. m.and No. 11 at 1125 p. m. Westward-No. 3, formerly Erie Mail, leaves at 7:55; No. 15, or News Express, 1230 noon; No. 11, or Niagara Express, 4:10 p. m.; No. 1, or Fast Line, 8:02 p. m. The greatest change Is made in the leaving time of No. 8, or Day Express, whieh is nearly an hour later than formerly. --� A Splendid Serial. In the issue of November 28d was be-gun in that popular family newspaper, Pennsj/lcania Grit, "Faraway Moses" new and greatest continued story, entitled "A Fool's Opinion." Besides this excellent feature Orit also contains each week a variety of reading matter ef such general excellence as can be found in no other paper of its kind. If you have not yet read tbe opening chipters of "A Fool's Opinion" you can get them, free of charge, by addressing P�nn�^!oanJO Grit, Williams-port, Pa. The paper Is also sold by newsdealers and newsboys In nearly all parts of tbe State, and the publishers wast agents In every town where it is not sold, to whom they offer liberal inducements. Dellnqaent Taxes. A special meeting of tbe Finance Committee of City Council will be held at the City Clerk's oflSce on Wednesday evening, Norsmbcr 20, 1800 at 7 o'clock to correct any irregularities in the levy and assesa-ment of delinquent city taxes. All persons aggrieved should meet with the committee at that time as it will save trouble and expense in tbe collection of the dtlioquent taxes.       John Candou, Ddliuquent Tax Collcetor. On December 6th. Tbe East Main street M. E. ohnrob will hold an entertainment in the cburoh Saturday evening, December 6tb. It will consist of a lecture, recitations, dialogues, &o. An admission of 10 cents will be charged. A special feature of tbe entertainment to-night will be the music of the premium orchestra and harp solos of Georgie Dean Spsulding. Kittle Rhoades is In Harrisburg this weak. Go and seethe Waite Company to-night, PEHSONAL PENCIUNOg, Mrs. Dr, Vandersloot has returned from a three months visit with friends at Harrisburg, Mrs. P. W. Keller has returned from ber trip to Philadelpbia muob improved In health. Peter Meltzler relumed yesterday from Philadelphia, having accompanied tbe "Hunting club" when they returned from tboir visit to this city. Jacob Rooting is back again at his post of duty in Nitsoho Brothers meat market. Jacob spent nearly three months athis old home in Lancister county, and wis 111 1 most of the time he wu abicnt. TRANSPIBINGS OF A DAY. ! PUNOBirr POT PODKBI. News of Interest for Our Many Headers to Peruse, THE LATEST LOCAL NEWS BULLETIN. A Sunday Kondac �pl>ode-A Fine Faint-InK-PrlMS Far Waltzers-Tba Boom il Tobaceo-Iacnase of Pension-On I>a > the maiutenanoe of a real aitate' boom iai tbe respective places. Now, taow^feri; there seems to be a oollapae id tbat Une,. aa is evinced by the falling off ia tbe: postal reoeipta in tbe three cities. . r' "A comparison made betweeo Ike baair: nessof the North, Soutb and West tbow* ibai tbeae seotions are keeplng'pcettj aloe* together. One city, where ttaeraba* beea a oolioeable deoreaae in postal reTenaea ir New Orleans, La., wbiobiiu keeo �atw-. ially affected by the aoti lottery law. Upr.: -wards of tlO,000 bare beea.eut off teTeiy month ainoe tbe passage ol the.;bill by' Congruss, and the offioe bae been tceutly reorgaoized, and the force redaoed bjt tba, retirement of nine men. ; Hooej order � business, too, has fallea ofi Tdrj parocpti>-bly, audtbe leaeiptsol theNew OtleUa. Post-office have been oarlailad M.lauk. one-third from what they were laa(;7au: by the action taken against tbe'lottery; people. .. "New York andCbicaga are ronninga close race, so far as postal buainaae is eon-oemed, and the prpportioas aseoiBed: by this branch of tba publie aervioe taMe b�-^ come gigaalie at botb plaoee. All tbroagh the West and Southwest there are splasd id' retnrna reported, and in some instaooee an; increase of from eighteen to tweaty-tbraa-percent has bceome apparent."    " Mysterious Murder, New York, Nov, S3.-Tbe killing of Diaga Falisonaon Saturday nigbt ie mystery to the police autborities of tbie oity, Diago was found with a bullet hole in his neck in East One Hundred and Thirteenth street. No one in the vioinity of the plase where tbe body was found bad beard any shot on Saturday. At the police station to-day Miguel Domino, the son-in-law of the deceased, said that Palisona wont from bis home at eight o'clock Saturday nigbt for tbe purpose of getting a paper of tobaooo. Wben the body was found there were 13,500 In the trousers of the murdered man. Tbe theory whiob tbe police bold is that Palisona waskilled in a gambling den near by, and to delude detection the body was carried out to tbe street and left there. The Boom lo.Tobaeco., The tobacco grower* in Lanoaitfr and; York coaoties are realiziog good priaeat for their crop of 1890. Bayais are at woikj il^^�wn>tiee eae�tioB|fl.Mi4.m�jii Winter in the Hudson Tallsy. KisosTON, N. Y., Nov. 23.-Wintsr weather now prevails along tbe Upper Hudson Valley. Snow fell throughout tbo nigbt, and to day tbe ground is covered at points throughout the Catskills. It is from two to four inches deep. Ice has formed on interior ponds, and skating has begun. It Is generally believed tbat winter has set in in earnest, and navigation is being rusbed through for fear of a sudden closing up of tbe Hudson and inland streams. Along the Delaware and Hudson eanal boats are being locked throtigh nigbt and day, but it is feared tbat some of them that recently went to Honesdale on tbeir last trip will be unable to reach tide water. The thermometer ia verging arour.d zero. Another Tiit With tha Folics. Ddblin, Nov, 23 -Tho people of En-niscorthy attempted to bold a meeting Saturday night to commemorate the Han. Chester martyrs, A procession waa formed with bands and banners flying, but the police ordered the people to disperse. The people refused to obey, whereupon tbe police charged the crowd using their batons right and left. The crowd retaliated by throwing stones. Finally the police succeeded in dispersing the crowd and restoring order. Delayed by n Wreck. Erie Mail train, or as it is now called train No. 6, was one hour and twenty minutes latd in arriving at this city today. The delay was caused by a freight wreck on the Ueadiug road where it orosses the Ponu'a tracks near Montgomery station. Tbe engine and seven cars of tbe train were wrecked. The accident was caused by an open switch and occurred about midnight. Mills Will Relira. tWASHiNOTON, Nov. 23 -The Post will �ay to.morrow that Representative Mills, of Texas, has decided to retire from public life with the close of the Fifty-second Congress, unless bis State sends bim to the Senate as a successor to SeaatorCoke. Woman do not seem to spell impropriety, with the big "1" tbat waa once, tbe late^* from IS to 28 oeate pet pooad for wrap^-^ pera, Tbeae aiepricee eaobae bava not iieen realized sinca tkaj war. . Clintoa coanty growers of the iraed will eban-in the benefits which the UoKiDley bill will, give to tbe farmer* of tbe United Statae^! Tbe orop raiaed io tkia eonnty thia yaai ia. large and the advent of tba bnyaia.-from tbe east it anziooaly awaited by tba. grower*. Fatmera wbo rotad tba Dano-cratio tioket will begin to reaUs* their folly wben they learn of tba boon' tobaa*, 00 ba* received. -t-; Prises for Waltsera. - � -There are two handsome silver oupi on' ' exhibition at X. B. Ringlet'* Jewelry store wbiob will be presented to tha: aioat graceful glide wailtzer* at the Knlgbta of Labor ball on TbankeglTing ere. Tba onp* are of solid silver and were preiented' by Mr. Ringlet. A Fiaa DlsaUy. Hilton & Co. make a fine display of kol-iday goods this year at their drof itoraon Main street and everybody sboold eall and examine t'>eir stock. An extended da^ soriptioo of tbe opening,, last Tboreday will ba found on tbe fourtb page........, Sncraase of Pension. Martin Rosenberger, a Teteran of tba late war has bad bl* pension tnereaaed from tl6 to t21 per month, tbe incraaae to' date from April 16tb, 1890. Tbe inBreanr was obtained throngb the agenoy of Pan! 8. Merrill. *'Unole Reuben" to-night. H3WS   AHO ROVKS. Mrs. Marie Wolaeley was faUlly toaaed and trampled upon by. a ball, at Bay-mond, Wisconsin, a few days ago. Sba was. passing through tbe bam yard wban attaoked. Tbe animal wa* irritated by % red shawl wbiob sbe wore.     .      ......", Rev. T. H. Loekwood, of tbe Hethediat Episcopal ohurch at Sturgeon,- Uieaovti; has been suspended from all miaiatarial! duty and church privileges, aa:the teanlt of an investigation of a ohaioh coaiaslttaa into obarge* of immoral.eoDdaat,'pt*i. ferred by female member* of. .tbW'Ohiitehi, ' There was Bled in Tnpeka,' Kaaias, Friday, tbe charter of the Omaha, Kanaa* Central and Qalveston niilroad oOmpany; or:;aniZHd to ooDstraot a line-of railroad from Omaha, Nebraaka, to Galveaton, Texas. Tbe estimated length of tbe pror posed road is900 miles, and the.,capital stock i* $18,000,000.    : : It Is reported that alicenaa be* beea le-. sued to the Balloon Cable Road .Coeapany at Chicago for tbe tranapottatiun off paa-. senger* io balloone, attached' to: oabl**,-' between different aite* of the Colambiaa ' Exposition, in Chicago, The capital stock is �3,000,000. Incorporator*. Philip Ha-'artb, Leopold Bonet and. Eagece Ool:-bret. A freight train on tbe Heriden, i.Wator.... bury and Connecticut Railroad wa* derail-: . ad just after crossing a trestle neat Men-den, Connecticut, Friday morning. The accident wa* canced by the brake beam of : a ooal ear dropping to the track. Two of: the oat* went down a forty-foot' embuk" ' rnabt, iDJoiiof two men, on�p�M�d ^ m as   

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