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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: November 20, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - November 20, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAR-NO. 225. LOCK HAVEN, PA.. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 20. 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS KINSIAE BBOTHJEB8---PCBLISUKKS PAVE THE  SIBEKTS. Look Haven b�� Dothing bot mortar beds to nfcow for the money expended dur-ing the put summer on her atreeU. How maoh longer will the Mxpsyere submit to tbia "penny wise and pound looliBb" policy by City Council in the matter of atreot improrementii? Why not pave a square or two each year with some substantial material, instead, of wasting thousands of dollars every year, as has been the custom ever since the city was organized. There ht� been enough money paid out in alleged �treet improvements during that time to pave every principal thoroughfare in Look Haven and in the face of all this no reform is instituted. Th* same expensive and unaatlsfaotory system is continued from year to year and will probably go on definitely unless the people arouse tbem-selvea to the impcrtance of having change made for the better, by choosing Conncilmen who will reform the method of street improvements and give us paved streets. Tber* has already been too much money wasted on our strests and It is high time to call a bait. Pave the streets and if it is dona systematically the cost iu the end will prove no greater to the tax payer than the system now pursued, and there will be sovething to show for the money expended. SURROUNDED BY TROOPS. Tke Hostilo Sedskins Encompassed by Strong Body of Soldiers. GEEAT SOAUE PEETAILS IB DAKOTA. CURRENT COMMENT. Just now it would take a bold man to predict that the Chicago Fair will be e success, such as the people have a right to expect. The Hon. Thomas B. Reed will have to lead the Republican minority almost single-handed in the next House. Judging by his past record he will prove equal to the occasion. The New York Herald recalls tkat "Oeneral Grant once said that the Democratic party could always be relied upon to do the wrong thing at the right time." Rigbt you are, and with one huudred and fifty majority in Congress they are pretty sure to verify the prediction ooce more. goteksor Pattieon's frieodB, enemies and oommentators are all engaged now in making Cabinets for bim. They are perfectly willing to take this difficult business ft his bands entirely, and all ho has to do is to wait until they have completed � suitable snmber, and then make bis �election from the lot. The salary of Master Workman P ow-derly has been reduced from }5,000 to iS,-500 a year, but an amendment to the Knights of Labor constitution increases his power. Hereafter, local or district assemblies will have no power to decUre a strike, unless ke gives his consent. The measure is s conservative one, and likely to avoid a great deal of trouble, for Mr. Powderly is not a man to order a strike hastily. Tke liquor licenie question has at last been ittUed inAtlantio City. The City Council bai passed an ordinance requiring that every retailer of liquors shall pay a license fee of }500. This is a result of the agitation begun last summer by the Philadelphia �vminy Bulletin against the pro-misoaona selling of liquors that prevailed under the old ordinanoe, which led to an Immense amount of dlBS'pation, disorder and even crime. asotbeb man is going to Europe in a mall boat. It is not qui:e such a cockleshell this time as is usually selected for inch voyages, but a steam lifeboat, and the hardy mariner takes with him his wife, his niece and a crew of seven men. His object is to demonstrate that bis lifeboat is oniickable, and If it succeeds in crossing safaly at this stormy season of the year the feat will go a long way toward ettab-lishing the truth of the claim. Bkazil on Saturday celebrated the first anniversary of her Republican form ol government. In this brief period she seems to have fully come up to what was expected of her. A general election haB legalized the Republic, thus endorsing the results of the Revolution. Order and tranquility have prevailed throughout the country and business of all kinds has moved along without hindrance or interruption. Brazil was a prosperous country � nder the Empire, and there is every reason to hope she will be even more so under the Republic. The Irish National League, in session in Dablin, is of opinion that Parnell should not permit a liltle matter like the O'Shea divorce suit to interfere with his nsefnlness, and it seems to bo the desire of Irishmen generally, so far as they have been heard from, that he should retain bin leadership of the party. This is on the principle that a man's private life is entirely distinct from bis public dntieB, anfi tbe one need not affect the other. It remains to be seen, bowever, whether tbe man ol British voters will acquiesce in tbls eUT-fltUDK doctrine. The Indians Showing an Ugly Disposition Bnt (he Sltnatlon U Now Believed to be FsTorabl* to th� Preservation of P�ac�- The Peopl* of Uandan Sleep In Their Clothes IVIth Kifles bT Their Sides. St. Paui,, Nov. 19.-A Pioneer Press special from Bismarck, N. 0., says: Late Monday night this city was startled by tbe alarm ot an Indian outbreak. Tbe report came from Mandon that the Indians at Standing rock Agency had left their agency and were advancing on Fort Lin coin. The Governor was called on for aid, and by morning the excitement was intense. It is known that the Sioux on the various reservations were iu a state of unrest, and the army authorities have been watching them closely. The redno-tion of tbe forces at Fort Lincoln and Foit Yates has made the settlers apprehensive, for there were 0,000 Indians at Standing Rock alone. A number of women and children came across the river from Mandan Monday night, having been frightened from their homes by the reported outbreak. Morton settlers have been coming in to Mandan all day, bot it turns out the alarm was unnecessary. Everything is quiet at Fort Yates and no trouble is expected there. Governor Miller sent 300 stands of arms and 6.000 rounds of ammunition to Mandan at noon, and several companies of State troops are held in readiness (or service. Very few soldiers are now kept in the foits in this neighborhood, and this fact being known to tbe settlers they were more quickly alarmed. The Indians could sweep the country west of the Missouri before assistance could be had, and the demand for enlarging the garrison at Fort Yates and Lincoln will be renewed. SLEEPISG OS THEIR arms. The Tribune, Mandan, North Dakota, special, dated last night, says: Every house in town is full to overHowiug with refugees from country districts. The most intense excitement prevails in tbe country. Settlers are prepared to believe anything about thelndiaosbecauBc of their queer actions lately. Several families came in to-day on foot, a distance of twenty miles and over, too poor to own wag-In town somewhat less tension is felt owing to the receipt of 300 guns today from tbe State government, and the fact that a company of soldiers will be here to-morrow morning from Fort Tot-ten. To-night there are 200 Indians in tbe town armed, but citizens are armed, too, and patrols will be oat and people will sleep with their clothes on. The date will be fixed by a committee of citizens, and Indian agents will be notified that after that date any Indian found in this country without a pass from .tbe agent will be killed on sight. The population Is thoroughly aroused, and although conservative men are doing their best to quiet tbe angry populace, there is every reason to believe that unless tbe Government takes immediate steps to increaae the force of soldiers here aud at Fort Lincoln, every Indian coming into the country will bo killed. the indians at FORT TOTTSN. A Pioneer Prew special from Jamestown, N. D., says: It is learned here that the Messiah craze has struck the Indians at Fort Totten, and they are inclined to be ugly. White residents at the lort object to the departure of the troops for the West. It is reported that one hundred bucks were Been crosaing the railroad track at Minne-wankan, and were enroute from the Turtle Mountains to join tbe Sioux at Standing Rock, but said thoy were going hunt-lug. surhousded bv THE troops. RosKRUD AoEKCY, S. D., Nov. 19.- When the Indians on this and Pino Ridge agency wake up to-morrow morning they will find themselves surrounded by the strongest body of United States troops since the defeat of Geronimo. It can be predicted that if home unfortunate act on the part of the soldiers does not add to the excitement of the redskiLS, the threatened upriBing will never occur. mandan citizkns  FEKL BliCUUE. Minneapoli.", Nov. 19.-Everything is fairly quiet at Mandan to-day, and the citizens feel tolerably secure. It is re ported that three hundred yoncg Sionx bucks are missing from tbe reBorvatlon. Nobody knows where they are. Keceut FueerHla. The funeral of Mrs. Maria Mulson was largely attended and tbe funeral services were conducted by Rev. B. F. Brown. The pall bearers were Robert Butler, Wil. liam Jackson, Robert Nelson, William Dore, Robert Washitigtou and William Sage. The relatives of the deceased desire to return thanks to those who assisted them in their bereavement. Tbs funeral of Frank Earon took place from tbe residence of his mother on Railroad street. There were services at the house by Rev. J. A. Wood, Jr., and interment was made at Highland cemetery. The following are the names of the pall bearers: G. W. Mason, Thomas R. Bridg-ens, H. S. Satterlee, Joseph Haberatrob, W. E. Parsons, John Noble. Where Yonnc Men are Welcome. The rooms of the Y. M. C. A. are already beooming a popular place for young men. Last night there were over filty young men in the rooms. All the games were going from 7 to 10:30 p. m. The reading room was well used, college songs and other amusements were enjoyed, and they felt as they were leaving that it was bet^ ter than loafing on the street corner or in the saloon. The Association rooms are open from 10 a. m. until 10 p. m. and youDg men are always welcome. An Old Resident i.eaveB Town. Mr. Thomas Yardley, who.with his family, has removed to Salt Lake City, Utah, has been a resident of this city for thirty-one years, and for 27 yeara was Treasurer of the West Branch Boom Company. He wasTreasurer of tbe Central State Normal School for nearly ten yeara and for two terms the voters of Look Haven honored him with tbe position of City Treasurer. Look Haven is sorry to part with so good a man, and so estimable a family, but what is our loss will prove a gain to the people of Salt Lake City. TRANSPIRINCS OF A DAY. News of Intense fiiterest for Our Many Eeadere to Peruse, THE LATEST LOOAI NEWS BULLETIN. Death or Lewis CofTev. Lewis Coffey, a well known citizen of this county, died last night at Farrands-villo, aged 47 pears. The deceased leaves a wife and five children. His funeral will take place on Saturday. Services will be held af the house at 9 o'clock, a. m., after which the remains will be brought to this city on Day Express for interment in QiEhland cemetery. Mr. Cuffey was an honorable, uptight man and was highly respected by all who knew him. \ I.eap for Dfa-DeMli of Lewis CoITeT-Th* rhUadalpblans Uisve-The Muiiaerade To-?>!s1>t-Tba iQjnred Woodsmen-The Kasolt-Hext Week's Atlractlon-An Old Resident Leave* Sown. A wonderful esoape from a horrible death was made Ttttfrday by a brakeman of one of the paaaenftr trains on tbe Bald Eagle Valley railroed. The brakeman was walking on one of the railroad tracks near the passenger d^ot and when near the Henderson street erossing an Empire freight train approached him from the west on the tracks at his right hand. He kept bis eyes fixed on the approaching engine, and evidenti; did not hear the engine bell of a coal train which was coming up behind bin. Several men who saw bis peril called to him bnt t' e aoi.se of tbe two engines aad trains prevented bim from bearing them. Tbe engineer of tbe coal train sounded the whistle when tbe locomotive was within a few feet of the brakeman and tint attracted his attention. As the irOBlmonster was about to strike him he gave a leap and landed in safety on the pilot of the engine. The men who had seen bis danger had turned away to avoid seeing the man ground to pieces under the engine wheels, and were never more surprised in their lives than they were when they; saw the brakeman perched on the pilot of the engine. It is said to be the most wonderful escape on record. PUNGEHT POT PODKRt. A Miseellaneoos HlztoTe of Sense and Nonsense gcissored and Scribbled. Ijist Snnday, with face clouded o'er, In church through the services she sat. And I noticed the bonnet she wore Was made over from last winter's bat. But Bhe% smiling and happy to-da^. And her face �hows no stgh of a frown. For her bonnet's more stylish, they say. Than any one else's In town. Onions are good for insomnia. The edge of a black silk handkerchief should peep from tbe walking coat pocket. The tony masculine night-gown fita loosely and imparts an air of languid elegance. A few octogenarian mosquitoes are still seen indoors, basking in the glow of tbe Rochester lamp shades, but their saenger-rests are over till '91. CONFIDENCE IN PARNELL Eaith in tbe Irish Loader Unshaken by Members of Parliament. THE ENVOYS WILL STAND BT HM. Oas at the Camp Grounds. A strong flow of gas was struck Tuesday afternoon about 3:30 o'clock on the uniata Valley Campmecting grounds. The well is now about 700 feet deep and was filled with water to within seventeen feet of the top when gas was struck. It blew the water to a height of forty feet, until tbe well was empty of water and sand. It tben^looked like heat from a bot stove. The excitement runs high in that section. Friday Night BleeUoge. At the regular meeting of West Branch Lodge, Ancient Order ot United Work men, to-morrow evening, tbe oUSoers who ill serve for the ensuing term will be nominated. There Is also other important business to be transacted and a full attendance of members is requested. Tbe regular meeting of the Womans Relief Corps will be held tomorrow evening at tbe usual time and place. The lojnrcd Woodsmen. Odoar Grugan, the young man who sustained such serious injury by the wreck Ferney on Monday night is still living, but in a dangerous condition. There is no hope of his recovery and tbe hour of his death is near. Ramstine, the other man nhose head was injured, is doing well and will recover. Israel Boyer, the foreman, is doing as well as could be expected. Milton Will Have Light. The town council of Milton have contracted with an electric light company to lurnish either Edison or Thompson-Houston system electric lights, for street lighting in that borongh. The lights are to be furnished at 170 per )oar. Thirty-five lights will be used at present. Grand Ledge Report. At the regular meeting of Great Island Lodge No. 320, this evening the representative to the semi-annual session of the Grand Lodge will report. All members are requested to be present. PERSONAL PENCILISaa. Dr. E. J. Stone, a special agent of the Northwestern Life Insurance Company, is transacting business iu the city to-day. G. B. Perkins, proprietor of the ever popular Keystone store, returned this morning from his trip to the eastern oitiss. Grant Frank, son of Daniel Frank, has just returned from a five years absence in tbe west and Eouthwest. He will spend the winter with relatives in this city and expects togo toSouth Americanextspring't Mrs. Mary A. Sohofiold, of South Kansas, is visiting in this city as the guest of PoBtmaeter and Mrs. Barker. Mrs. Scho-field is a sister of Mrs. A. Sloan, and loft this city for the far west in 1852 and this Is her first visit in the east since that time. Mr. S. C. Miller, advance representative of the Waite Comedy Company, is iu the city shaking hands with tbe many friends m
                            

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