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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: November 19, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - November 19, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                '4 NINTH YEAK-NO. 224. LOCK HAVEN, PA., WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 19, 1890. PBICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS EINSM>K BBOTBEKS - - - PCBLISHERS current comment. Dr. Koch eagge8t�that the name of tbe new remedy for tuberculosis be "Parato loid." No one would eare what the name iB if only the remedy proves an affective one for the most dread disease of north' tn countries. It begins to be understood that the great banquet given ostensibly in honor of Mr. Thurman was intended also to set on foot, in a formal manner, the candidacy of Grover Cleveland for President on the Democratic ticket in 1892. AsDBEW Jackson Quiglev, of Wil-HamsporC, it is said will be a candidate for Deputy Secretary of tbe Commonwealth under the Pattison administration. As he ia one of the original Pattison men, his claims will no doubt; be pushed for the position.__ The military and naval forces will unite in a grand demonstratioo of welcome to the Brazilian fleet when it arrives in Now York harbor. This will be greeting that will have its due effect not only on Brazil, but also on all the Latin American nations. Hon. a. C. Hopkins has reason to feel hif hly gratified at tbe ovation tendered him by the Williamsport Republicans and bis Look Haven friends last night. It ei-oelled anything of the kind seen in this city for many a day and shows oonoiasive-ly the popularity of our new Congressman among the people who know him. CAS.1da has been offering a gift of 100 acres of land to the fathers of families of 12 or more children, and thus far 1,009 applications for the Government bounty have been made without all the returns being in. Some of the applicants have from 13 to 17 offspring, and one has 23. At that rate the population of Canada ought to grow rapidly. Bdffalo Bill's "Wild West" European venture netted him about {300,000 in cold oash. T. C. Crawford, who managed the European trip of the show, is $130,000 richer than when hs started out. Crawford is well known in newspaper circles, having been for some years tbe Washington correspondent of the New York World. A besclt of the general overturning that tbe Farmers' Alliance has made in Kansas is that there will be onlylfour lawyers in the lower branch of the next Kan-Baa Legislature. The "embattled farmers" of Kansas will be represented by men of their own calling in the Legislature, and the result, so far as lawmaking is eon-corned, will hs awaited with a good deal of interest. Hayox Kellers* Order. Williamsport's chief magistrate Mayor Keller, has given orders to the policemen to arrest men or boys beard using profane or indecent language upon the public streets. The order will, it is said, be enforced. The American Underground Mining Exhibit^ of Chicngo, to build an underground display mine for the purpose of exhibiting the mineral resources of the United States at the World's Fair, to ho held in Chicago, and to establish a permanent museum of minerals and other ob-jeits of curiosity and give musical and other entertainments in conjunction therewith, filed articles of incorporation in Springfield, Illinois, yesterday. PKB80NAL PENCILINS8. L. M. Smale transacted business in Williamsport yesterday. John Christ, a bookkeeper at the First -N ational Bank, is confined to his room by illness. Robert C. Jackson, of this city, has bten granted a pension, the date ot issue being November 7th. Rev. F. Seubert assisted Rev. Gormley, of Renovo, yesterday, at the funeral ol the late John Burke, of that place. A. P. Weitzel, of Roynoldsville, and engineer at Hon. A. C. Hopkins' saw mill at that place, spent last night in this city. Thomas Yardley left this morning for Bait Lake City, Utah, where he will make his homo in the future. His family left for that place several days ago. John Davis, whose body was sent to Tamaqna to-day, was a member of the P. O. S. of A., and attended the last meeting of tbe Btate Camp as a delegate. G. B. Perkins, proprietor of the Key-xtone store. Is in Philadelphia and New York, purchasing another large stock of goods for the popular Keystone. A. P. King, postmaster at Snow Shoe, and general manager for Hopkins and Weymouth, at that place, and Mr. Frank A. Pratt, manager in the woods for the same firm, were in the city last night. ^. W. A. Simpson, Jr., the cashier of the State Bank of Lock Haven, was one of tbe goMts at tbe elegant dinner given by W. U. Hensel, Esq., at his borne in Lancaster laat Satarday evening to a namber of iriends. THE THREATENED UPRISIM General Bnger Betnins From His Inspection of the Bic Injun Scare. EEPOBTS OF DANGEEEXAGGEKATED Mandan Not Threatened by an Axmed Foxce. and tba Only Fear Is From Cblaf Humps' Band-That tTIlT Old Badskin Liable to Cause Troabla in tbe Bprlnc -Tbe Real Sltnatlon. Sr. Paol, Nov. 18.-General Ruger, commanding the Department of Dakota, returned this morning from a tour of In-spcction among the various posts of the northwest. General Ruger 'was busy with accumulated work, but Lieutenant WoodrnS said the reports of trouble were more or less exaggerated, particularly those with reference to the belief that Mandan is threatened with an armed force. The Indians located nearest to Mandan are about thirty-five miles away on the Cannonball River. They are a thrifty, industrious, peaceable people, who have taken up claims, built |hutB and houses, own cattle and wagons, and are in good circumstances. The band from which any real ontbreak anticipated is that headed by Chief Humps, and situated southeast on Standing Rock. Like all leaders he is very wily, and if the promised Messiah does not arrive in the spring ho will probably tell that the whites are using their infiuence to keep him back and that the beat way to aid him will be to kill some of the pale faces. However, in the event of tbe ex-tremest emergency, the troops will be fully equal to the occasion, the Department of Dakota and the Flatta being close together. to nOLC tub INDIANS in CHECK. OuAHA, Nov. 18.-Troopa from Fort Omaha, Fort Robinson, Fort Niobra, Nebraska, and a pack train from Fort Resell, Wyoming, have been ordered out to hold the Indians in check at tbe Pine Ridge and Rosebud ageooies on the Dakota frontier. They will all be in motion before nighty___ DEATH T�BRIIILE BUT UCICK. STANLEY DIBECTLV ACCUSED. A Heary Iac Fells on the Head of a Boad Snpervlior. Mahanoy City, Nov. 18.-William Haokett, a resident of this plaee, employed as a road supervisor for the Reading railroad company, met with a fearful death to-day. He was giving inittuctioas to a gang of his workmen under a trestle near the North Mahanoy colliery, when an employe named Cavern pushed a heavy log over the edge of the trestle. It struck Hackett on top of the head, croBbIng in his skull and breaking hia neck, oansini; instant death. Cavern was frightened so badly that he fled from the colliery. Sbnoted to Ber Death. Birmingham, Ala., Nov. 18.-A relig iouB revival has been in progress several days at tbe colored "Slethodist church in this city. Yesterday Mary Davis and Rhodi Wright became wildly excited by a kind of religioas freczy. They began shouting at a terrible rate and hugging each other with all their strength. This was kept up some time when the Wright woman fell to the floor exhausted. The other woman fell on to her and continued shouting. In failing the Davis woman's knee struck Rhoda in the chest. In a few minutes tbe congregation noticed that Rhoda has ceassd to shoot and was gasping tor breath. Mary was pulled off, but it was too late. Rhoda breathed her last in five minutes. Her death caused the wildest confusion in the church, and has broken up the meeting. Went Wlld^Over Gordon. Atlanta, Nov. 18.-John B. Gordon was elected United States Senator today. Tbe vote in tbe House for United States Senator showed that Gordon lacked one of a majority. Speaker Howell then cast bis vote for Gordon. A dramatic soene followed. Men went wild, the crowds in the lobbies broke through the doorways and the greatest enthusiasm prevailed. Cel�br>Unc a Ulrtbdai. Mr. George Glossner, of Vyoodward township, was 55 years old yesterday. His daughters, desirous of giving their father a pleasant surprise, invited upwards of fifty of his friends to help celebrate the event. An elegant dinner was served to which all did ample justice and upon departing extended to Mr. Glossner and bis hospitable daughters many, many happy returns of the day. The Soldiers Will Dance. The ofiicers and memberB of Company H have decided to hold a grand military ball in the Armory, on New Years e�e. The committees will be announced later. A Severe Arlicle Poblistaad In the Universal Kevlew. London, Nov. 18.-Mr. Qoilter, editor of the Universal Bevitw, baa an article in that publication on tbe Stanley controversy, which &as attracted much attention. Mr. Quilter says he is espeoially informed that Jameson'a diary and letters were plaoed in a box by Bonny after Jameron'a death, and the box, after being sealed up by Bonny, was confided to SUnley. In stead of forwarding tbe box to Jameson's family Stanley broke the seals, opened tbe box and retailed the papen in hIa possession, only patticg with them after repeated applications, inciading � letter from a lawyer acting for Jameson's family. Tbe family commeneed legal proceedings, wbarsupon Stanley delivered the papers to the care of the Ottoman bank, from whiob they were raoaived by tbe family. Stanley made extracts from tbe diary before handing it over to tbe Ottoman bank. Quilter traeaa the origin of the sterlas against Bartlett and Jameson to Bonny, who be says acted aa a tale bearer in general to tbe camps. Stanley, be declares, would never have dared to make such statements unless be bad been aaanrad that Bonny would confirm them. Bonny, be says, waa tbe paid servant of Stanley. Peter Mtitzler's Giieite. A party of twenty-four prominent citizens of Philadelphia are guests of Peter Meitzler. proprietor of the United States Hotel, and will remain in this city until some time tomorrow when they will return to the Quaker City. The gentlemen are known as "Peter Meitzler's Hunting Club" and arrived yesterday afteroooo in a body. Each man wore a badge and carried a black ebony wood cane with a silver knob. They also earrled a large battle axe and a huge sabre. The name* as registered are George F. Hartman, Jr., James Fulton, Looia Burk, Chris. Priesen-dsnz, Samuel Carey, James Dongbetty, Michael Connelin, Charles Nicholson, Fred Decker, Edward Willig, William Rodeobangh, Thomas Sheridan, John L. Derr, B. Goll, Philip Berger, Gottfried Heller, Jacob Ludy, Henry Felton, Henry Keittei, Fenlinand SohaefTer, Samuel Rosenfelt, Willliam P. Becker, Charles Pfizenmaier and Gottfried Binder. Among the party are several Aldermen and all are substantial representative men of Pbikdsl-pbia. While they are known aa a "banting club" tbey say about tb* only thing they are hunting is trouble. Tbey are not likely to find trouble in Look Haven and the freedom of the city Is extended to Peter Meitzler's guests. This afternoon tbe clob will go te Renovo, returning on the midoigbt train, and to-morrow afternoon will leave for home. They are a jovial good hearted set ot men, who are enjoying their trip to Look Haven heartily. - FeteHon'e Holiday Kumber. "A Holidap Number" one may well call the December Peterson. The "Cupid" on the title page is an enchanting little fellow and the steel and full page wood engravings are very beautiful. The opening illustra'ed artxle, "Some Ice Carnival Sketches," is in Harriet Latham's sprigbt-liest vein. "A Problem Never Solved" is the best story we have ever read from Edward Fawcelt's faoile pen. "From Christmas to Christmas" is a capital tale, witb a series of admirable illustrations, "Along Lake Como" is another finely illustrated paper. These are only a few of the nvmber'a attractions. Lney B, Hooper's Paris letter give* the newest fashion chit-chat and the colored plate and other designs the latest styles for outdoor and home wear. The needle work department teems with designs for holiday gifts. Now is tbe time to get up a club. Terms: $2 a year. Two copies, f3.60; three copies, (4 50, witb a handsome premium to tbe getler-up of the club; four copies, tC.40; six copies, (9, witb an extra copy of tbe magazine for ene year to the getter-up of tbe elub. A sample copy, with full particulars, will be sent to club raisers.   Address Peterson's   Magazine, 300 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. --i- Tbe Clara Price Monnment. The granite monument erected over the grave of tbe late Miss Clara Price, near Karthans, will be uuveiled on Thursday, November 27, 1890, tbs anniversary of her death. A fnll and complete description of the monument was given in the ExrnESB at the time tbe contract for its election was given to J. R. Batcbelder, of this city The coat of the monnment was $318 and the foundation cost about >25. Baptist Chnich Supper. The ladies of the Baptist church are expecting you at their supper to-morrow evening. The fnpper will be served in the basement room of tbe church from 5 to 9 o'clock. A splendid bill of fare will be prepared, and all are invited. A Maiquarade. Tomorrow night a masqnsrade ball will be held in Scott'a bazar.  Good mnsic will be in attendanoa and an evening ot , pleasure la aisnred to all who attend. HONORING i C. HOPKINS. Several Hnndied Williamsport Eepublica.>i8 Visit Thia City last Evening. THE AFFAIE A GEABD   SUOOESS They FabUely OeasmnUte the Nevj Con-snssmBB FnaaThia Disttlct, and a Sen-eial Ontpoiulai of the Popniaor Adds AdmlisttoB . t* tbe Scane-8t-ninc Speeches Maae. Three hundred or more Repablieans from WiUiamapoit, accompanied by tae Fisk Military Band, arrived in thia city last evening on Fait Line for the purpose of extending oongntulations and paying their reipeeU to Boa. A. C. Hopkins, Congregaman-^efttur this district. Their arrival was uitieiiiated and tbe visitors were met at the depot by a large number of eitizena of thia^city who gave three rousing cheen (or tbe Williamsport Republicans as tbey pissed through the open ranks, and then beaded by tbe band tbe crowd marched to the residence of Mr. Hopkins. The evint was made the occasion of a general outpouring of tbe people of tbe town, and on the march from the depot to Mr. Hopkins' residence the visitors saw the side walks packed solidly witb men, women and Mtiidren who fell in witb the marobing boat and swelled the large crowd that filled tbe streets at Water and Vesper. Three renal eg cheers were given for Congressman Hopkins; the band played several fine selectidDs and while the atrains of melody enterttined the crowd in the streets the WilliaBspoiters were shaking thei band of the Coagressman, After the bandsbakinga and greetings were aver Mr. Hopkins briefly addressed tbe people, thanking his visitoia for their call and extending to them a hearty welcome. Short speechea were made by Hon. John Ormerod. of Conderaport, Emerson Collins, Mayor Kellei and C. W. Scott, of Williamsport, J.,B.G. Kinsloe and J. B. Myers. After the' speech making waa ended, the band (iVored tbe people with another selection aail the crowd then grad-naily diepersed. IcWma a grand ovation and must have been very gratifying to Mr. Hopkina. The people of Loek Haven were there en masse, itnspective of party, and joined heartily in the cheering for our new Congressman. It was a soene seldom witnessed in any town and one that will long be remembered. The Williamsport patty returned on the midnight train. PUNOEHT POT POUKBI. Death or Mrs. McCaireTty. Mr*. Helen Blanche HeCafferty died yesterday at her home iu Bradford, Pa., after an illness of three weeks with typhoid fever. Mrs. HeCafferty was the wife of Charles K. UoCafferty, ex-City Treasurer of Bradford, Her mother, tbe late Mrs. T. C. Crawford, was buried in this city about throe months ago. She waa aged about 27 years and leaves a husband and two children. Battle and Charles, aged respectively 6 and 3 years. Tbe remains will arrive in tbia city to-night and will be taken to the residence of Mrs. Green, No. 319 East Church street, from where the funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Funeral services will be held at tbe house and interment made in Highland cemetery. Mrs. HeCafferty was a lady who was much respected by all who knew bei. She was a devoted wife and mother, a true obristlan and a lady of lovely dlspositioii. The Terdlot Bendered. The Coroner's jury empaneled to inquire into tbe causes that led to the death of John Davis and Henry Eislnger at Black Hollow on the Ferney Mountain railroad Monday evening, met last night and rendered a verdict The verdict was in accordance with the facta aa stated yesterday, and the jury found that no blame waa attached to any one for the accident. The body of John Davis was sent to Tamsqoa to-day for iaterment. A brother of tbe deoeaaed arrived here last night and aocompacied the remaina to Tami-qua. Oscar Grugan was still alive last evening, but his physician has no hopes ot hia recovery. WeddlDC at Wayne. Mr. D. Seward, of St. Mary's, Elk county, and Miss Anna E. Deise, of Wayne township, will be married to-morrow evening in tbe M. E. obnrcfa at Mc-Elbattan. Rev. Jsmeg Hunter will pei-form tho ceremony.   . ' will Open a BraBCIi OBee. It is stated that a branch office of tbe Renovo Evening Newa will shortly be opened in this city. A solicitor and ool-lootor and a correspondent will comprise the staff in the Lock Haven office. A MlaocUaneooa Mlxtore of Sense and Mon-ania Sdisored and Scribbled. A city mast pay ita debts, and tbe tax payers are tbe taxmakera. Clergymen aa well as newspaper men should fully investigate before indorsing or assailing persona or things. When you are looking-for woik don't forget to ask for it. There's many a squeeze between the waltz and the midnight dinner. The violinist bows before bis elbow works the bow. A great many people aot aa if they bad their souls in pawn and loat tbe ticket. The higher tbe aociety tbe lower the At all events SUnley baa secured a flrst-olaas advertisement tbroagh the remnant of the rear gfnard. Tbe ballot box needs tbe highest kind of protection. A banana peel is cot a respecter of persons. When you doubt a friend you might as well dissolve partnership. It is beginning to be a question whether lumbermen will have to nse crude oil aa a substitute for snow, as tbey did last winter. Tbe HoKinley bill will aot affeet the price of the Thanksgiving turkey. The air is already laden witb prognostications of the holidayB. A long engagement is the best chance for a woman to keep the npper band of a man. Tboee who know a thing or two aay that these are the days to wed. The man who expects hie daily bread will never get It by loafing. Heaped in the boUowa of the wood, tbe Autumn leavea lie dead. The frequent rains bave very muob interfered with out-door labor. Tbe election woands are he aling. Salt water applications were most effective. The halcyon days of Indian Summer are thought to have been sidetracked. The standing of some men may be measured by tbe quality of segara they smoke. Tbe man who Invented the tin horn must have been Satan'a adjutant general. Apropos of the "last rose of Summer," sweet potatoea are now on their laat round. Economy is the road to wealth, but a great many fellows manage to cut across lots. There are seventy-two pieces in a woman's shoe and twice as many suppressed D.'e. Some people bad rather bug a delusion than a pretty girt. Editors are not of that class. What baa became of the shellbark crop? There has been few if any brought to town. Flanelette la printed canton flannel. Blue Is (ot babies, pink for girls. Undyed seal makes a pretty shoulder cape. Otter and beaver are two furs mnch alike. Poultry fed on oorn-meal bare yellow (at. Tighta are warmer than regular stockings. How good a man is (o bla wife the first day after she has eaugbt him doing something wrong. Soma men are so stingy that they'll expect yon to pay rent on the place yon occupy iu their esteem. Tbe man who wins the day ought to bave plenty of time at bia disposal. A man's lot may be hard, but his neighbor's bens can make it look fuzzy. END OFAREMABMLECASE NO FIAT MOKBT. A Fanner Defranded By a Oonple Who Olaimed to be Mediums. THE SWIHDLEES   FOUHD   GUILTY Drawins the Jury. t The Jury Comm issioners and Sheriff | Leahy are drawing from the wheel to-day the namea of tbe men who wilt do jury duty at the January term of court. Furs and piusbesare appearing timidly. . The pupil lasbed. of the eye Is Incessantly It is odd that all men are trying to get even. Now that we are in the milanohaly daya, the hnibandman will direct bli leiinre bonra to (ittenlog hogi. The VicUm Was Made to Believe That Be Heard Ksltway Trains Banntnc IB Heaven and Saw MilU Orladinc Out Lnmber-Cont'erencn Held With St. Peter and St. Paul. Sdsqueiianna, Pa., Nov. 18.-In the criminal court of Susquehanna county, at Montrose to-day, there was concluded one of the most singular oases in the legal history of the State. Soores of witnesses gave their testimony, and people from all over this region crowded the court room every day. Olive Brown and ber husband Philander Brown, spiritnalists, seonred through their peculiar doctrines and man-ifesUMons, such control over - Paul Hill, an aged man, residing In Brooklyn township, and formerly of Iowa, as to obtain from him nearly t3,000. The Browns represented that they were in communication witb the spirit world; that Jesus Christ was in heed of money, and that Hill must farnish some to be forwarded; also that HiU's first wife, now in the spirit land, needed money (or new clothing, etc. Hill from time to time furoisbed.mooey, which waa placed In a Bible in the presence of the trio. During the night tbe money would vanish and Hill believed it went to the spirit land. While on tbe witness stand Hill told of the manner in which the spirits instructed himseK and wi(e to do various things, and of bearing tbe spirita singing "I a.n so glad that Jesua lovea me." They alio heard railway trains running in Heaven and saw mills turning out lumber with which to bnild the heavenly city. Mis. Hill o(ten conferred with St. Peter and St. Paul, and with Mr. HUl'e firat wife. After a long deliberation tbe jury foond the prisoners gnilty, and they will be eentanoed on Friday. Struck by an Eniine. John Flicker, a man of aboot 45 years, was struck yesterday afternoon by tbe engine of an east bound freight train on tbe Beech Creek railroad and snstained injuries which resulted in his death a few houra later. Mr. Flicker lived a short distance beloT tbe watar tank of the F. & �. railroad. He had been; it this olty most of the day and was walking down tbe railroad track towatda bia home when the aooldent occurred. He waa taken to his borne by tbe track men and Dr. Litob-tantbaler called to attend him. The physicians found his skull fractured and be bad a gash in his scalp about three inches in length. The deoeaaed waa a veteran o( the late war and a pensioner. His (nn-aral will take place Friday, lervioea to be held at tbe bouse at 12 o'clock, and interment to be made at Highland cemetery. Flicker leaves a wife and four ehildren. PMBllar FBI From the Lawrence American. There is a family in Charlestown in which are four boys; the first was named Leon C. Carter, the second waa givAi tbe name of Xlno C, ao thought being given to tbe name previously given; later the ooincidenoe was noted thai the |nama of the first son contained exactly the lettera of the second, aad that, also by accident, the termination of tbe middle name was ton." Two additional sons were born, and here are tbe names of the (onr: Leon C. Cartes. EIno C. Carter. Noel C. Carter. Enol C. Carter. The middle name in each instance terminating in "ton." We doubt i( any other family can match this combination. Andrews' Raiders. There was a (air attendance at the Opera House last night where the painting of Andrews' Raid in tbe heart of tbe Confederacy waa on exhibition, witb a lecture by Mr. HcKnight, the engineer who was on the locomotive at the time It was captured. That tbe audience waa not larger was no doubt due to the excitement outside connected with tbe visit of Republicans from Williamsport. Those who were present were pleased and entertained. To-night the lecture will be repeated. The proceeds are for tbe benefit of tbe Grand Army and tbe Opera Bouse should be crowded to-night. This May or May Not be TrB*.' Last Fall is waa notioed that the -trail of the ground mole plainly marked the letter "Won the surface of the eartb. That letter indicated "Warm W;intar," and the size of the past Summer'a iee billa proves that we had It. Now tbe npbeav-alsoftbs wandering and busy moles dis-tinetly trace the letter "C," and wiie'men ire taught by thii that the ipproaohiog winter will be a cold one. Tb* ground mole la evldantlj dssitoai of orowdlig tb* gooM bone and weatber prophet DeVoc lontorbasineH. Senator Bbeiinan PoinU Out tha Daasar In Ita Issue.   . J  \ ; Washinotor, Nov. 18.-^The Secretary of the Treasury has almost finlabed bia annual report, and it will contain' no ref- ' ereuce to the financial schemes now being agitated by the Farmera' Alliance. Not-viitbstanding this fact, tbe Treasury offl-ciali do not hesitate to ezprew inxiity it tbe outlook. As is well known, the alliance demiinda the free coinage of silver, the passage of a Sub-Treasury bill, and the ibdlitlon of the national banking system. Until- tbe ra. cent election these demanda did hot ezolto a moment's serious attention. Blooe the 4tb ot November, however, matteia bivs assumed a different aspeot, and.'althoagh there la no present orisis, the paaaiblUtiaa of the future are causing some apptehen-aion, U tbe alliance baa.forty-tbiea oiambers of tbe next Honse, as la claimed, it baa a wedge of no small size witb whioli to open the way for the pasaaga of. ita aohemea. :. : �. That tbe Demoorata will coalisae' with tbe alliance men in tbe hope of winning votes (or 1892 is qnito probable^ eren ahonld tbe party find it eonvaolant not to keep, if Buooassfnl, promise* whiak it made prior to the election. There Is also a poasibiUty that th* Senate will be so eonstitated as to ague* with legislation originating in the rBoiiM.v All these thinga are being ^ietly :taken into conaideration by the! Tceasary Department, thongh ofoonrae'noi move-will be made to avert what is believed to be a danger nntil tbe latter appear* mora a real than aa a threatened (act.. once beodh, wqebb :wiLi, it^ksd? If Congreas enacta that 4400,000,000 in Treasury notes,. for instane*, ahkU be isBoed, tbe Treasury can, of coon*, oom-ply; bat is it realized that an Uii* U -dry from the printing proaa tberewilllM � demand for 1400,000,000 more,: and. where the demanda will end no Treaaory oflcial daie* to prophesy.  -.c.;!! Even the diBonssion of the^HJonaCrib bill," aa the Farmera' AllUnpe Snb-lbBaa-ary sehome ia oalled, will be a'aonvee of aneaaiaesa to tbe flnamiial inteieata cf>tbe country. Tbe demand(ormor*�aMyia realized at the Treasury, bowever^isione that cannot be ignored.'!   -i Tbia ia abown by the (aot tbat '^iae* tbe laat day o( last Jane no le** tbsa ^W^OOO,-000 baa been paid oot to meet tbvnlgsn-oes o( the money market. Ef eiy eeSt o( thia large amonnt baa-be*n �baorbtd'ind there ia a cry for more. <   -1 Whether tbe Treaaory Dapstta*M~�Ill aak Congress to aotln tb* mattM- baanot now be (oretold, but it iv not'i�g*HI*d as improbable that lagislation looking toUhia end will be enaeted,: Seaatat'Sberiaan, under who** gatdane* the oonntty eMtged from tb* treaohenmi mit* af papersMmay to tbe broader ground of siWeM payatent, la not diapoaed to andetrstis tti*-�ide-apread movement (or Bn-.iiieteiaM^ear-renoy, but be look* at th* mstttrtn a pblloaopbio light. "There iSBOrtibjeetton to a larger olrcnlating m*dia�^"''hb ^id, �provided it I* redeemed in goldandillver coin. We bav* learned; that-alt^ other oarreney ii a (ailun. Dnriagi-tli* war we had to issue paper.- Itwaa mimpoatiTe aacaaaity and I voted for tbe bUK '' " patb of the ABaBimsX BEPtTBtid. "After a while the valiieof tBp mqney began to deciins until it waa_ vrortii !bnly only 49 dents'on t^e foliar.' #e'!ii^ a great struggle to gel, biaok to',!^ar, but when we reaehed that 'pdint prosperity as aaanred. . 0( odnrae there wilV,be always people who wiHhime'ati^^^ in flat money, bat snob cdrrencynmst Inevitably bring us to rain;."' T '    f^,^.'; " "But tbe allislhoe advoeaUs'^ tbe^^Iu of grain in governisen{warehotuM''aB ae-ourity (or tbe money.''      ' -  '  " a "Oh, yes." said the8enatbr.'*TlMpw it does. But," he added,.ina tiioui^^tfal way, "down in South America is an'utual illnstration o( the worklnga of l�e Firm-era' Alliance plan and, ita resnlt., '^'Tbii^ Argentine Republic was bnei of the "moat prosperous countries in Sonthi 'Amatiaa. it tried the plan of loaning' mionej on everything, and it baa bean wreok|^,'Dearly carrying tbe great honse of 'Buing Brothers down witb ''it." doIdTwu at a premium of 161 in'the rejjuWlb. "It ia a country with climate and manjr ..otber characteristics similar to this.'' It can hardly be possible thatwbal baa proved so disastrous to thQ Argentine Re-publio will ever reach even an ezperimen. tal stage in tb* tepublie^ of t))a,.-yoited States.;* .., .     , - �� Who A�M�;Btm*l    , WiUlamiiport BepubUcan SovTBith,  Ex-SeoatorPealebW';*^^!!;)^^ to the Ijoolc HayeD'iiefl^af lai* tOigM denying that be oppo*ed,tlt* alutloui^Hon. H. F. Bltiot for Congreas. mHa i* it up in Clinton eoonty tNat^^ie^qTMiigBe^tor Peale of opposing fiuibtt, a^y t'ow,! Or owit be posiibUiltai.ih*, asq^irigoad-natnted tailroad magnate and .liNiJw is trylBgtoiBakaldsdaDid of owMHdB to SlHbtti1ittl*ktraog^(^Uial^;�^-d�iAl of iita tHand Banter K�^'olf|jM|n|t;i   

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