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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - November 18, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAK-NO. 223. LOCK HAVEN, PA., TUESDAY. NOVEMBEK 18. 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXCESS KIHglOK BBOTHBB8 .^-j^g^Bg CURRENT COMMENT. TBEoeDBiM retnrD* will, it ia B�id, �bow tbtt nmrlj three-tcnCbR of tbe population ol the Uaitad 8t�te� aie city folk*. DuRiKo the lut ten monttiB tbe exporle or ekttle, boge, beef, poik and dairy pro-dooU from tbe United States amoanced in -ralae to 4108,758,069-an inoreaea of a little more than (13,000,000 over the exports of tbe aame period of last year. "Who," aska tbs Knoxville (Tenn.) THbune, "can tell tbe whereaboota of one ierl P. Morton, lately elected V. P. of the XI. 8." Juet tie the Uniud States Senate on tbe queatioa of protection to American indoitriee, and yoa will find out where be il �o qaiok it will mak* your bead awini on the aarfaoe ot the eonp. A Democratic organ remarks that tbe Repablicana are very good-natured over tbeir defeat. Of coarse they are. Good nataro ia a Republican trait. Aad Re-pablicua oia't help feeling good-naturad when they think of tbe ridiculous aotios tbe big Domooratio majority in the next Hooaa will oni._ In some parts of tbe Stite of New York the farmers are wrestllEg with the Bohemian Data swindle. Notes given by them to the sharpers to tbe extent of (60,000 are on tbe market and law suits have been institnted for tbeir payment. The farmer, wbo at this late day allows himself to be entrapped by such a transparent swindle, desenrea to lose bis money. We are told tbe packers of canned meata have put up tbe price of their goods baoauae tbe tariff will increase the price of , tin. On tbe other band, the bide and laatber dealers have also combined to put up tbair gnoda, although raw bidrs were pat on tbe free list by tbe McKinley tariff. There saems a sort of a contradiction here which oar free trade friends can no doubt nnravel to tbe oomplet� satisfaction of tbe pablie.__ The H�n. B. R. Peale wrote a leeter to S. R. Peale, and answered it himself, and both were pnbllahed in yeiterday's Democrat, Tbs pablio is no doubt glad to have the testimony of the ex-Senator himself that his skirts are clean. From the amount of rain we have bad recently and the muddy condition of tbe streets of Lock Haran it is quite a feat to keep one's akirta from being soiled. Major McEiklet is undoubtedly rifihc in Baying that, so far as tbe election was Cmted by the new tiriff law, it was tbe miarepraaentation of tbe act, and not its actual effeek, that caused tbe people co vote in disapproval. It could not have bean tbe latter, for there was not time to show ita full effect, and such effect as it had, dnring the month that elapsed between ita enactment and tbe day of tbe election, was altogether benefiaial to this oonntry. Aa soon aa tbe bill became a law, numbers of foreign manufacturers bagan � race to see which sboald first get brsnobea of their business eitabJiahed in tbe Unitad Btatea, and every indication pointed to a greater degree of industrial development than the oonntry baa ever known. It was shown, too, that while the ohange in the tariff necessarily bore bard on aome people who bad not felt any burden before, on tbe whole tbe presaura was lightened, not Inoreaaed. The new tariff ia three per oent. lighter than the old one, and if the people bad bad time to become oenatomad to it, they would have found lau faalt with it than thej did with that. Bat tbey ware given no time to experience It! workings for tbemaelves, and persistent miarapraaantation canaed them to bellevn what waa not trae. Tbe Tariff bill probably did not play as great a part in deciding tbe election as it bas been credited with, but it certainly had its effect, and that effeot is due to tbe persistent misrep-naentatiODa of the Free Traders and tbeir alliee.     _ Qveea TictoTla** Bedroom. No room in Buckingham Palace has occasioned more curiosity than tbe Queen's bedroom, aa she gave orders that nobody ahoald ever be pormiltsd to view it. Corioalty oonld not have been centered round a more unpretentious apartinent. Tbe bedstead and furniture are of tbe simpleat description, but the room is crowded with pictures and pbotoa of the Prinee Consort. It is a veritable treaaore-hoosa of mementos of her Majesty's late bnsband. For tbe same reaaon nobody is allowed to view tbe dressing-room adjoining it. _ Beech Greek *Time Table. Important changes have been made in time of passenger trains running on the Beeab Creak railroad. Easlbound trains now leave Lock Haveu at 10.-08 a. m. and 6:43 p.m. Westbound at 8:41 a. m. and 6.-07 p. m. Corrected time table is given in another column of this paper. A Bvldce rer tbe CbanaeL Fabu, Not. 17.-Tbe French engineer Bannault has aada a report to tba Min-IstiT of Work!, in favor of & bridga aoroca tbe EDgUib obsnnal. ARlAmTlCK CaDses a Mnl CoMon FerneyLast Hiilil Near TWOMENINSTANTLYKILIED Four.rerionBly Injured,Several of Whom WiU Probably Die. HOW THE omSTEOPHE OOOUKEED It Take, Place on the Feniev Mountain Kallroad One Slile From the Phlladel-plila & Erie Ballroaa-Mames of the Dead and Wonndea-Hedical Aid Sain-moned From This Cltr to Alleviate the' SafTerlDsa of the Irjured-The Coroner's Jorr-AFnll and Graphic Account by An "Express** Keprescntative Who Tlilted the Scene of the Disaster. Black Hollow, on tbe Ferney Mountain railroad, was tbe scene last night of a terrible accident by which two men were killed outright and four others wore badly injured.   The Ferney Mountain railroad is a short line extending from Ferney Btition, on the Philadelphia & Erie railroad, to a point four and a half miles out into tbe lumber woods where Daniel Sbepp, of Tamaqua, has lumbering operations in progress.   Ferney Is twelve miles west of Lock Haven.  Last night, at about 5:30, the men employed at oulting prop timber, in the woods at the terminns of the railroad, quit   tbeir   work   and   started to   ride   on   an   eight   wheel  truck to the boarding house which is located a short distance from tbe Philadelphia and Erie railroad.  The eight men were Israel Boyer, foreman, Willium Ramstine, John Davis,  Henry Eisinger,  David   Spado, Horace Freed, Odoar Grugaa and Ad Yo-cum.  The trnok on which they proposed to ride four and a half miles down the mountain, bad been taken out to tbe woods with a locomotive.  At 5:10 the engineer left with his engine intending to go aa far aa Black Hollow switch, where he was to take out two cars loaded with prop timber. THE BIDE TO DEATH. The men had gone some distance towards the boarding house when they came to a place where tbe grade was greater and they noticed that their descent was becoming more rap;d. Israel Boyer, the foreman, was at the brakes, which be applied with such itreoglb as to stop the wheels from revolving. Tbe rail:i were wet with tbe drizzling rain which was falling and the brakes had no effect towards cheeoking tbe speed of the truck, Another tteep decline was reached and the truck was flying at lightning speed. The sturdy woodsmen realized their danger, and when abont half a mile from Black Hollow switch. Ad Yoenm, David Spade, Oicar Grugan and William Ramstine, jumped from the truck. Yoanm and Spade escaped with but slight iojuries. Grugan and Ramstine snstaiced severe and Grugan probably fatal injuries. The other four men, John Davis, Henry Eisinger, Isreal Boyer and Horace Freed, remained on tbe truck. From tbe time the fonr men jumped off until Ibe truck collided with the locomotive at Black Hollow, was but an instant. When the col-lisoB came the truck was smashed into a thousand pieces, and the men were sent Hying through space until tbey came in contact with something stationary. Thomas White, tbe engineer, was on bis engine and Charles Streok, fireman, was standing on the ground near the engine. W. J. Williams, of Pine station, was standing on an embankment above the railroad track only a short distance from tbe engine. Tbe shades of night were failing and in the deep hollows along Ferney run it was already growing dark. The scene was one which the men who witnessed tbe accident will never forget. Tbe cries of the injured caused the men to devote their attention first to them. As quickly as possible a messenger waa dispatched to Farrandeville, five miles distant, from where a telegram was sent to Loak Haven, asking that physicians bo sent at once to care for the injured. Tbe dead and injured were tenderly lifted and placed upon an empty truck and taken to the boarding bouse, a mile distant, where all was done to allovUta tho sufferings of the injured until the arrival of the phy-siciaus; THE UEAU AND IS.IDRED. The names of the dead and injured with their places of residence are as follows: Killed-John Davis, of Tamoqua; Henry Eisinger, of Beavertown, Snyder county. Injured-Oscar Grugan, lives on opposite aide of tbe river from Ferney, skull fraotarsd and pbysloiana aay be cannot reaovar,   William Ramstine, ooncuislon of tbe brain. Israel Boyer, Lock Haven, left foot crushed, scalp wound and back injared. Physicians amputated two of his toes. Horace Freed, of Beavertown, right leg fractured above and below tho knee, knee cap torn loose. Boyer and Freed were both suffering great pain to^iay. Freed waa Uken to tbe hospital at Williamsport, and Boyer was removed to bis home in this city today. They were brought down on Day Expraaa train. Tbe body of Eiainger was sent on direct to Beavertown, and that of Davis was taken to the boma of Israel Boyer, on Henderson atreet, this oity. CAKIKO FOKTHB IBJDBKD. The telegram sent from FarrandatUle to this city requesting phyaieians to go to Ferney and care for tbe injared men waa received soon after seven o'clock. Doctors Ball, Hayes and Watson responded to the call and went to Ferney on Fast L'.no at 8 o'clock. Tbe boarding house to which the injured men were taken is only a short distance from tbe Philadelphia and Erie railroad, and there the physicians found tbe suffering woodsmen. Tbeir wounds were dressed and tba snffer-ers made as comfortable aa medical skill could do, and the doctors returned to this oity again on tbe midnight frain. A messenger also arrived by that train to notify Coroner Mader that his services ware needed, and undertaker Bricker wae also informed that be was expected to furnish coffins for tbe dead and prepare the bodies for burial. WHERE THE ACCIDENT OCCUKRED. Black Hollow, where the accident occurred, is about one mile distant from tbe Philadelphia and Erie railroad. At Black Hollow there isaswitcb,and trnckBarernn in on a siding to be loaded witb prop timber. When Thomas White, the engineer, left the men at tbe terminus of the road at 5:10 p.m., he came as far aa the Black Hollow switch and stopped bis engine there, intending to take out tbe loaded cars. Be bad joai finished filling tbe tank with water, when ba beard tbe men wbo ware coming on tbe truck hallowing. He reached his hand up to grasp the rope, which, when palled, would set tba whistle to sounding, bat before he could do so tbe collision ocenrred. AVilliams, who stood on the embankment above tbe track, and saw tba collision, saya the trnckcama like a flash of lightning. Tbe engineai bad tbe brakes set on his engine but tba force of the ooUisSon sent the heavy locomotive back the length of itself. David Spade and Ad Yocum, the uen who escaped witb but slight injuries, jumpsd from tbe truck at tbe top of the first hill. Oaoar Grugan was the next man to jump and ba was fonud lying among tba rocks where he had fallen. William Ramstine followed Grugan when he jumped, and it is thought his head struck a stamp. Davis' head struck against a railroad tie, and bis death was no doubt instantaneons. THE CORONER'S IR ok place at Westport today and aba waa buried alongside of her husband, wbo died about aevanteen yeara go. Tbe Andrews Baldars To-Nlsht Remember the entertaininent at the Opera House to-night, nnder the aoaplaea of John S. Bittner Post. The followibg notice we clip from the Cmritr of yesterday: /''^^'v^ Every person who^ttended tbe entertainment at the Opera House Saturday evening waa delighted witb what tbey aaw, tbe Andrewa Raiders. It is a magni-floent presentation brought here for a worthy cause and the attendance this evening sbonld be more than double that of the flrat night. Easton Post never gets anything but that which is good and the scenes to be portrayed to-night will present one of the most thrilling obaptera ot military life as experienced in the late war. Heroism commands gratitude and admiration and it la most vividly pictured in the Andrewa Raiders.            - TbankailvlBs Feast. ...... Tbe membera of tbeEvsngelioal Churob will prepare a hoat of good thinga for Thaakagiving Day that will attract many to tbe Montour House. For dinner they willaerve turkey and all the neeeaaary adjuBots that go to make np a tempting meal and for aupper chicken and wafiJes. Tickata for dinner 35 cents, lor aupper 25 cents.  Buy one or more ticketa when called upon. -� Bereaade aBd BeeeptloB, A delegation of Williamsporters, ac-eompanied by the Fiak Military Band, will visit Lock Haven tbia evening for the purpose of tendering a serenade and paying their eompliments to Congreaaman-alaot A. C. Hopkins. Tbey will arrive on Foat Hoe at eight o'elook and will at onee pro-eaed tv '^e realdenee of Mr. Hopklna. Olnb. There will ba a apeoial meeting of tbe Grindstone Club held this eveoing at 7 o'clock. Ail members are roqueated to be present. There is oonsidsrable complaint abont the scarcity of egga jnat now. All tba roostefv of tba land bavlog been doing duty in tbe eolumna of Democratic newa^ papera may have aometbing to do witb it. At three years ot age we love onr mothers; at Biz, onr tathars; at ten, bolidaya; at aizteuo, dress; at twenty, our sweet-hearu; at twenty-five our wives; at fortyi our ohildren; at sixty, ourselves. Time can be measured by tbe tasks we have to perform. It is fast if we are playing and alow if we are toiling. But tbe end is tbe same distance away under ail circumatances. PBB80HAI. PKHCIUIleB. Fonnd Dead in Bod. The Westport correspondent of tbe Renovo Neat says: Sunday morning Mrs. Christina Herman who bas resided witb her daughter Mrs. I. Mjers for the last five years in this place waa found dead in bed. She waa 78 years of age and bad sboitly after tbe flood received a light paralytio atroke but waa atiil able to be around. Sbe bad iMen as well aa nsual and retired about alx o'clock Saturday aTaDlDg: about 8:30 p. b. aa tba obiMico An Entire Freight Tain Fteovittiked into the Kver.':"^*"'^ TEH �II>LED AHS SEVEKAI. IHJUBED An EaUra Span itt tba BrMca Qlvaa VWaj Under tha Tnia aad tba wiiela'�aaa Dropa Tblr^-aaa Fast ialo tba jii^^r, Bolow-Tha LocomoUvaBBd Cata BbsM In FlttaeaFeat �f Watar.j , Kansas Citt, Nof. 17.-:-Tbiai}!9oniac as a freight train: waa- oiqaaiog bridge over the Kaw river, ia tbia �lty,�.apoa pt tbe b'ltdge gave way, and piaoipihUaii.tha entire train into tbe :river,.tbi(tr-ona Ast below. The train eonaistad of-.oan, lo^-ad witb hoga, farming: imfderaenu and grain. , ......^-./l, 2', Ellla Moore, colored^ who,'wUv^taoUog a ride, waa killed. Fireman'F^,,Aiiaii> of Lawrenee, Kansas^ ia miaaiag ; and ;ia auppoaed to be.nnJar Uia ^radk..,, . The following petaooa,wara:lai^ad:^., Thomas F. MiUigaoi bead jfrakama^^f Eanaaa City, Kaasaa,sarioaBljr. hurt aiid wmprobabiydifc, Cbriation Patch, engineer, jof^aosas City, Kansas,, leg and bsekhadlir'bruiMitl. Pink Harold, ooodnstar, allf htly brais- "i. ;:i x::-,;.^ ^S. y. Smith, of LatbaB.EaoBaa>,JbraU-edabout the.back and legal "-. ' 1 D. Fi Whitepatch, brakemoj,'sligfitly bruised. '^  'j Fiftyeight bead of hagB;Were. drownad. At the scene of the disaster.' the'^^iyw is fifteen feet deep..- The engine,]ud'tnijo are buried oat of aight-, /     '. ,   a IJkTBB jBfiPpBT, ,f. ., " ;; I, Tbe list of killed and voondadi aofaraa known; is as followa: '     '.-^  *3 Fried  Allen, ficeiaaa, of- IiawtaMe, Eanaaa. ' ..      ' ' ->  w�m..ildiavito theirwork.    '        ,-� -;Lia:;)i U LatiBHr, wriorad, tlna^ribai Thefoilbwingliatof aonaadCtbe � irg, furniabad by tUe'Atnum^svtt* aw to get aboard tba lU fated. tMH aad.^ tbey have aeitber pnt-ia aaappaatHMWiu their working places nor hkva'ntiHMd home, it is feared tbsttbay an oiaoor tta loat: Ralph Fay, Frad' BaU,> ad.iiBaika, Frank Wall, DavaBrownU' Vhiai^tnam who boarded the train aavanl'statttaassfp the road are alsoBiaaiag. 'Aa'Vmf laiit-ing aiasappoaedtokalra-baaa UUe4^ aad their bodiea are now l^nUMy^Mnaaadda s, .-al the wraekage.' ABB ^mvram.,.. George Calhoun baa accepted a olerk-ahip at Kamp's ahoe atore. Mr. Fred Johnson, of Indiana, Pa., ia visiting his parenU in tnia city. Hon. John Ormerod, of Couderapott, is among the viaitora in Look Haven to-day. Mr, H. 0. Chapman, ot Philadelphia, ia circling among bia Look Havan frienda today. Mr. Jacob F. Gloasner, of Beech Creek, township, who fell from a threaber some few daya ago and dialooated bia shoulder, ia not improving as rapidly aa bis frienda would desire. It is feared the accident will keep him in the house for some weeks to eome. Hon. H. C. HcCormick as a member of the Congressional Committee appointed to investigate tbe alleged illegal j practice in the United SUtea District Conrta, ia in Louisiana at present. He left for Ne' Orleans last Friday. His.esKmable wile and Mra. S. T. MoCormick aooompanied him South. Mr. J. N. Farnsworth went to Belie-fonte laat night to see the opening performance ot the Waite Comedy Company. Tbis company will open a week'a engagement in this city next Monday. Hi,.Fv says the band and otcbeatra aonneoted witb tba company la even better than last year, and it waa then ooasiderad among the best on the road. Mr. Rurooe Hntf, organist of the Flrat Presbjteiian Chuicb at Williamsport, and well known in this city, has been tendered the same position at tbe Protestant Epls-oopal Church ol tbe Aonnnoiation, in New York oity, at a aalary of 17,600 a year. It ia neadlBBa to aay be will aceapt. Hr. HuS ia eonkideryi by many of biaadralnis the best organist in thiBOOOBtf. One bonse of tl^ Oklahoma Legjalacue baa paaaad abiil making' it a'criminol IIM for a newapapeir "to 'even iaalMa�i'iii$-tblng agalnat'a man's ebartetari^^llaliier ItiaafaatOTnot.".,       n trf ..il-K.Vi The Conaolidated FinKocka fiqapa^ o( America baa bean inoorpontad,.in Albany, New York, with a oapital of V,-500,000. It ia for mahufaotnring and Ml-Ing flreworka,' flags, bannara aodolrtisMa of a aimilar nature;'       . -    ; :i i:,'i\i!v Albert H. Smith, Junior partner-Ur New York firm ot Hills, RabaB�i)&~ baa been arreated on tba charge of.fc-. He has oontessed to ootrimitting- rtver enty forgeriee, sggregaUaftMO.OOOj VBa forgeriea cover a period of aix. jaam aaMh saya he used, the money. obti|ifa^ ^i>^ forgeries to raimbuise eostomers.uf tjia firm wbo had loat money on hUi'lmggW-tiona. ^ Mrs. Arthur Batemai�,'0fNiw7otllSita Wedneadsy laat mlBBedtwodliiminikiaas lata, valued at tl3,000^ wbieb bo^ baaqla a receptacle to which only beraalf and her maid, Louise Laehot, bad aeecaa. Tba maid was ariaatedand plaaed isHdarllO^-OOO baiLSunday dateotiTM foaad tba-braae-leta behind a enrtain in a room eta the third floor ot tha hooaa. The atae'vHIl probably be relaoaad. . George Hazsard, of Tocoma, ao^a'thot arrangemenu have been oanetadM;aitd tbe capital raiaed by a Bjndloaia'.''o( Kua-aian capitiliaU and some prominaut TShm York railroad men, amonit ifbom H Bio-; tionad Henry Vitlard, to build ft.MilrOtd f.om Pnget Sound to Alaska. .Uip az-peoted the line will be looatednext iprlfig. The company baa a oapi^l ot.II5u.000,-000, audit ia underatool tb-it a" lida �0f ferry boau will be put on to carry entire tralna across Bebring Sea, wbera tu^ Will connect with a Russian railroad aero a tka deaeit wutea of Siberia. Tbe iuter 'p�|t of the project is still unoeitain, bot a-itwd to Juneau will bo commenced eaily-ia^Ke spring. � .....- �� Tbe banking Arm ofCowlUg,. Coww-look lib Co., in Mount Carmel. Pa., I)aa closed: Hr. Cowling, the Pteildeii^ died recently. On laat Tueaday, tba Caahtar, David Cowenlock, left Mount Carmal to raise funda to meet tba rnab on the opening day. Ashe did not letulTD telegrama were aent out in all directions for blm. but no olew to bis whareabouta has baab discoversd. On Saturday morning a receiver waa appointed and the aafe opened. It contained less than 1280. The suppad-tion is that tba oaabier got away wlHt (15,000 or 130,000.' No accurate eatlaaata aoo toaaoda, aatba asaminaHaa M^Mm tOoWUMttalthad. "    -<   

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