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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - November 6, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAK-NO. lilo. LOCK HAVEN, I'A., THUKSDAY. NOVEMJ3EK  , 181)0. VHWE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS HINSL.UK BROTUEKS - 1-UliLISlIKltS HUKKAH FOtt HOPKINS. Hurrah for Hopkins, the next Congress roan from the Sixteenth district'. Although his majority is small it must not bo forgotten that be had great odds against him and in view of aU the circumstances ha ceitaiuly deserves much credit for tlx vigorous canvass ho made and the excel lent voto ho polled in too district. Notwithstanding the combined efforts of the Democratic State and local commit tees, assisted by Republican "kickers,' Hopkins made a good run iu Tioga and Potter counties, his vote being about 400 less than Dolaruator in Tioga aud only about 40 in Pottor. Iu Lycomiug and Clinton counties ho ran away ahead of the head of the ticket. The vote Clinton gave hira is something to be proud of. lie car ried every ooucty in the district but Lycoming and hid friends there stood nobly by him, as Elliott, his opponent, fully 600 behind Pattison in that county. Wo add the following editorial comment of the Williamsport Gazette and Bulletin of this morning: The Sixteenth Congressional district barely escaped going down iu the general wreck, the latest returns showing that Mr. Hopkins came out victorious by a very narrow majority. For this result all eredit is duo Clinton county, whose voters so manfully ralliad to the support of the candidate in whoso bands tbey kuew their interests would ba safe. The election of Mr. Hopkins is important to the people of the distriot, even though the next Home will bo Demooratic. Powerful measures were adopted by the Deruocraoy to defeat Mr. Hopkins, hut in their zeal those engaged in tfao work devoted all their energies to Tioga county, and neglected Clinton. Tbo people of the latter county stepped into the breaoh and wrested victory from tho jaws of defeat. In doing this Clinton has covered htimeif with glory as well as saved to the Stato a Republican representative. Mr. Hopkins will make a good Congressman. CURRENT COMMENT. It was a clean Democratic sweep and the Republicans are snowf d ui der in all parts of the country. Pattison got there, but lie wiii feel kind of lonesome with the Legislature aud state officers Republican. Tnn defeat of McKiuley is deplored by all Republicans, but it is nothing for the Democrats to brag over when it is considered that they have a majority o[ over 2,500 in the distriot and only elect their man by about 200. The Democrats will control Congress by a good-sized majority and of course t hey will try and repeal the McKinley tariff bill. As long as Harrison is in the White Hou3o bo free trade bill will ever become a law, but nevertheless the agitation of the question cannot fail to disturb the business interests of the country. The latest returns indicate Pattison'b election for Governor by over 1G,000 majority and the Democrats have good reason for rejoicing over their victory. Tlio Republicans cautakesome comfoit, however, in the lact that "Watres and Stewait, our candidates for Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of Internal Affairs, have run far enough ahead oT Delamater to insure their election. There is some significance in the faot that Watres and Stewart ran ahead of Delamater in nearly every county in the State, their majority in Philadelphia alone being over 11,000 greater than Delamater's. The latter failed to carry bis own county. Oil CD. To the W. C. T. L'. and all interested in the work. Do not fail to be present at the "Joint Session" of the Co. Ex. Com. and Supts. on Friday next, at 11 a.m. The program has been published in our daily and weekly papers, and it Is hoped that all will respond to the announcement by their presenco and aid. Co. Supt, Press. PATTISON A SURE WIMER Ee Gets There With a Majority of Sixteen Thousand or Over. W&.TEES AND STEWART ELECTED At "WUliamnpoft To-Day, The County Commissioners are in Williamsport to-day settling up with the Lycoming County Commissioners the matter relating to the building of the bridges over Pino Creek. There is a balance due Cliutan count* as we are informed by Clerk McNaul. A HanrtBome Fainting. A portrait of the late Dr. A. O. Walls painted iu oil is on exhibition at Hilton's drug More. The aitist was Miss C. II, Merrey, daughter of Hon. J. W. Merrey, of Brrch Creek. The likeness is a good one, and the picture painted with artistic Bkill. Ah the Smoke of the Battle Clears Away the KesnlU Show Forth Plainly, and While the LoiR&s Are Heavy There lt> Homo CouHolation to ho Obtained-"Wntree ami Stewart Get Old Fafthloneil Majorities. PuiLADELrniA, Nov. 5.-Complete unofficial returns from every county in the State give Pattison, for Governor a plurality of 10,209 over Delamater- The Republican candidates for Lieutenant Governor and Secretary of the Interior, Watres and Stowart, are no doubt elected, as both ran far ahead of Delamater iu nearly every county. Philadelphia couuty alone gave Watres a majority of 11,279 greater than tbat for Delamater, and Stewart 11,007 greater. In Allegheny and the other counties Watres and Stewart received an increased vote about in proportion to that of Philadelphia, Of twenty six State Senators voted for yesterday the Democrats elected sixteen and the Republicans ton, making the next Senate stand thirty Republicans and twenty Democrats. KETUKNS BY COt'STIEs. Following are the pluralities by counties for Governor. The pluralities givou were in nearly all cases taken from the complete returns in various counties: 	1JEXA MA-	r'A'ITI- 		SON. Adams...........................		 Allegheny.....................	3V�	 Armstrong....................	................     :i>i	 Heaver...........................	_............       -iihj	 Hedfnrd..........................	aw	 I Jerks............................		 Blair..............................	......    jvi"	 Brad lurd.......................		 Mucks.............................		iv*> Hut jer............................		 Cambria.......................		17'J5 Cameron........................	.................          li	 Carlton..........................		779 Centre.......................		177$ Chester..........................	1100	 L'iar(oa..........................		 Clearfield......................		 Clinton.......................		 Columbia.......................		'>m L-'uiuuerJiimi..................		 Dauphin........................	...........     ll*"i	 Delaware......................		 Elk.................................		�53 Krie...............................		 layette..........................		iaa; Forest............................	I Hi	 f'ranklin........................	_.........       \iZ	 Fultou...........................		iris Greene.........................		171.1) Huntingdon................		 Iiidtaua.........................	......      7V-	 JeH't-TKon.....................		i�> Juniata..........................		:m Lackawanna.................		1S4I7 Lancaster......................		 Lawrence......................	..............     JJ7-1	 Lebanon.....................,.	................     ll&l	 Lehigh.......................		2M'J Luzerne... ........._..........		 Lycoming......................		24'.!H McKeau.......................		 Mercer.........................		 Mifflin............................		a�i M on roe..........................		 Mougomery...................		JltSD Montour.........................		7S2 ^Northampton...............		 Northumberland..........		HVJo Perry............................	ZZZZZ...        1(0	 i'h 1 lad eiphlu...............	................   207^	 Pike................................		SSI rotter............................	...............    :w�	 Schuylkill.....................		�igis Snyder..........................	ZZZZZZZ      47i	 Somerset.......................	................    lTifJ	 Sullivan........................		on Siibriuehanua................		 riojsa...............................	...........   r,\*)	 Union.............................	'M luralliy It),!*/.). THE HUrsL-'LT Of   CONfi kes8, The latest returns from the twenty eight Congressional districts of the state show the election of nineteen Republicans and uine Democrats. The present delegation from this state stands twenty-two Republicans and six Democrats. First distriot, Bingham, Republican. Second, O'Neill, Republican. Third, McAleer, Domoorat. Fourtb, Reyburn, Republican. Fifth, Harmor, Republican. Sixth, Robinson, Republican. Seventh, HaUoweli, Domoorat. Eighth, Mutchler, Democrat. Ninth, Rmuuflr, Democrat. Tenth, Brosius, Kopublioau. Eleventh, Ameratao, Democrat, Twelfth, Shonk, Republican. Thirteenth, ReilJy, Democrat- Fourteenth, Rife, Republican. Fifteenth, Wright, Republican. Sixteenth, Hopkins, Republican. StjTenteonth, Wolvoiton, Democrat, Eighteenth, AtkiuBon, Republican. Nineteenth, Beltzhoover, Democrat. Twentieth. Scull, Republican. Twenty firfct, Huff, Republican. Twenty-second, DVzoll, Ropublioan. Twenty-third, William A., ^tone, Republican. Twenty-fourth, Stewait, Republican. Twenty-Pftb, f'hillips, Independent Republican. Twenty-sixth, (jiiswald, liupublican. TwfcUly-seventlt, C'barlea W. Sti�ne, Itc-ptiblican. Twenty-eigbtb, George I'1. Kribbh, Democrat, THE HESULT IN OHIO. C'OLL'Miius, Nov. 5.-Tbe Republican State Committee claim 14,000 plurality on tbe head of the ticket.   They concede the defeat of McKiuley by '200 and Foster by 7.1 or 100. Accoiding to tbo returns so far received the Ohio Congressmen elected aro: Fu-Bt distriot, Starr, Republican; Second, Caldwell, Republican; Third., Uouek, Democrat; FouiLb, Gautz, Democrat; Fifth, Layton, Democrat; Sixth, Donavin, Dom. ocrat; Seventh,Ilayues,Democrat; Eighth llaro, Democrat; Ninth, Outhwaito, Dem ocrat; Tenth, Doaue, Republican; Elev-entb, Pattison, Democrat; Twelfth, Eu-choa, Republican; Thirteenth, Duugan, Domoorat; Fourteenth, Owous, Democrat: Fifteenth, Darter, Democrat; Sixteenth, Warwick, Democrat; Seventeenth, Pearson, Democrat; Eighteenth, Taylor, Re publican; Nineteenth, Taylor, Republican; Twentieth, Taylor, Republican Twenty-first, Johnson, Democrat. The ' election of Hare and Warwick is not estab llsbed by complete returns and the apparent majority in each case ia so small as to make it unsafe to claim an election until fcbooffioial count is made. From official and unofficial returns received from all but ten counties in the state, plurality for Ryan, Republican, for Secretary of State is 10,129. kansas   snow km i n dick. Kansas Citv, Nov. 5.-The Republican caodidato for Governor is boaten. Six out of seven Republican Congressional candidates are defeated, Senator Ingalls' reelection is u subject of grave doubt. There was a landslide, a regular avalanche in Kansas, eighty-two thousand Republican majority overwhelmed by tbo resistless forco and buried beneath its destructive weight. The Farmers' Ailianc did it and it was a great surprise. the KKSi;t.t i-v west VHUflNIA. Wheeling, W. Vs., Nov. 0.-The Indications are that the Democratic tidal wave has taken West Virginia in its course, and tbat the party has made a cleau sweep. Hubbard, Republican, for Congress in tbo First District bus been defeated by fully �'iOO majority. Smith Republican, for Congress iu tbe Fourtb Difctrict, still claims bis election by a small majority. The State Senate will probably be a tie. the VOTE IN DELAWARE. Wilmington, Del., Nov. r�.-Coniplote returns elect Reynolds, Democrat, fur Governor. Cawsoy, Democrat, for Congress. Wilmington and New Cante counties arc Republican on county ticket. Legislature is Demooratic in both branches wtiv, or course it is. New York, Nov. ">.-Francis M. Scott, defeated candidate for Mayor on tbe Fusion ticket, speaking of tbo election today, attributes his defeat to the anti-Mc-Kinley feeling, which bo said was stronger in tbis city than in any part of tho country. claims in  minnesota. St. Pali,, Nov. 3.-Roth parties olaim the election of tbe Governor by a small j majority. The Democrats claim three of1 five Congressmen and possibly four. The i Republicans claim a small miijority in tbe \ Legislature. j HEl'tlU.ICAN" VICTORY IN ILLINOIS. Chicaco, Nov. 0.-Tho full vote of III- j ioois, official, unofficial and estimated, in- J dicatu the ejection of Amborg, Republican, j for State Treasurer, hy a plurality of about missouri ALMOST unanimihs. | St. Loiis, Nov. -Tbo Democrats, send a full delegation to Congress with one exception, F. Van, iu tho Tbiitoeuth ili3trict. They eleo'; tho Stale ticket and a large majority ou joint ballot in Lbo Legislature. EVEN  iowa IJEMCM UATU.\ Deh Moines, Nov. .r).-Tbe Democrats gain four Congressmen in this State. Tho indications are that tbe State is Democratic by a small majority. NKfiKASKA   f.N   VUIC   VAN. Lincoln, Nov. r>._Koyd, Democrat, fur Governor, will probably have -J,000 plurality. McKciglitui, Democrat-AIliauoo, Bryan, Democrat, Dorsey, Republican for CongresB are elected. W lift t   SI r.  IH-1 it ma (�� r fc'ay�. Meadvili.e, Nov. 5-"I went into tbe contest to make an honest, straightforward fight. I have douo so and by tho fortunes of politics, I have been defeated. If the party can stand it, 1 certainly can. Aa to tho causes which led to tbo result, I have nothing to say at present. I do not care to discuss them uow. For myself I have nothing to regret and for my friends nothing to reproach. The result ends the whole matter, so far as I am concerned. I shall now devuto my whole attuntiou to business, which I h?we uot done for some timo past.'* This ia what Senator George Wallace Dolaniater mud to-day as he walked homo to luncheon fnmi his uflioe in the banking bouse of Di!hwn<;Jer & Co. Beyond this be would h iv tithing for puliiic&tiou. Senator Di'Uy.^U'r rt^civdu conclusive evidence of U�pubiiuao defeat u\ \ o'clock ih'.d morning. Previous to that time, it bad beeu iin^.-,Miib)o to get any dtflnilo information fium Philadelphia or Piit.iburg. The CuiuitiltiHloiit-rtt Alturncy. The County Commissioners met yesterday and appointed Mcssis. Kress Geary as their attorneys In place of T. C. Hippie resigned. I HOPKINS WINS THE PRIZE He is Elected to Ooagrcss From This District by a Small Majority. ADDITIONAL RETURNS FROM COUNTY The ISojfl Parade-Identified by III* Tlioto-Kniph- Taken Home Tor Huriul-Olvo lis flroro LlRht-"Polly" the Holme- At WlUiamtiKirt Tu-Htiy-The Commissioner* Attorney-A llHintttauiti I'Hinting. Complete leturns, part of thorn ofEoial from tbe four counties in the Sixteenth Congressional District gives A. C. Hopkins, the Republican candidate, a majority of 03 aud the Republicans thus save a Congressman from tbe general political cyclone tbat swept over Pennsylvania on election day. Tbe majorities in the sev-, eral counties composing the district are as follows and it will bo seen tbat Hopkins carries every county but Lycoming : Hopkins.     Elliott. Cliutou............... 1172 maj. Tioga................1270   " Potter................ 'JijS   " Lycoming.........................  1S5G Tho Final Couut. At 12 o'clock noon, to-day, Judges Mayor, Crawford and MeCrea met in tho fudge's chamber in tbo Com t House for tho purpose of counting the votes in Clinton couuty. The clerks wore George A. Brown, James A. Wcnsel and S. M. Mc-Cormick. There were a number of persona in the room while the count was progressing. The following figures are official: For Governor, Delamater 2307, Pattison, '.3%, Gill 87, Rynder 1. Pattison^ majority 10S0. Lieutenant Governor-Watres 2383, Black ;W22, Hyatt 02. Black's majority 039. Secrotary of Iuternal Affairs-Stewart 2392, Barclay 3312, Dunn 92,   Barclay's majority 020. Associate Judge-McCrea 2G70, Clark 7G, Miller M.   Clark's majority 100. Congress-Hopkins 3041, Elliott 2G09, Ames. 70.   Hopkins' majority .'J72, State Senator-Malone 2G01, Meek 2973, Miller SO.   Meek's majority ^72. Assembly- Fredericks 2oG9, Quiggle 3115, Morris 75.   Quiggle's majority 543. Prothonotiiry-JefForis 2572, Brown 311*), Schaetllo 70.   Brown's majorily 5-13. Sbenfl-Best 2472, Everbart 3203. Ev-erhait's majority 7^1. Treasurer-Loveland 2350, Csldwell, 33-11.   Caldwell's majority 9S5. Commissioners-Welsh 3.!51/, Ivisaell 2552. Kissell's majority over Welsh 193. Mussina 335G, Brosius 2905. Mussina's majority ovor Brosius 451. Auditors--McGbee 2532, Leit/.ell 2170. McGhco over Leitzel G2. Bridgens 3152, Moyer 3123.   Bridgens over Moyer 24. District Attorney-Bruingard received 3231 votes, having no opposition. best testimonial of its worth. We will s^y, however, that Miss Rboades sustained tbe title rolo with tbe ability of the artiste tbat she is. Her popularity increased to a large degree with the performance of the difficult part. She has a grace and charm upon tho stage tbat is captivatiug to a high degree. To-night a double bill will bo presented, opening: with tb� farce of "Edtthas, tbo Bunilar," and followed by "True Grit, or Reddy tbo Waif." Us member the prices of admission are only 10, 20 aud 30 cents. If you anticipate going securo seats in advance as standing room promises to be at a premium. )Tennessee W�rhler� Coming. Puglesys Brothers' famous Tennessee Warblers of the V&nderbilt University, Nashville, Teuu., will give one of their delightful concerts In the Trinity M. E. Church, on next Monday evening, November 10th. The cntertainmem is spoken of by the Williamsport Gazette and Bulletin and other exchanges as being most enjoyable and unique. Admission 15 and cents. Do not fail to purchase two or more tickets wbou called upon by the ladies of tho church. GROVER CLEVELAND REJOICES What He Says About the Besnlt of the Eeceat Elections. WHAT HE S�ES IN THE EETUfiNS The   Hoy*   I'arade. A number of small boys celebrated tbe election of Pattison last night by a street parade. They made considerable noise by blowing horns and yelling, and illustrated tho Salt River trip by carrying a boat. The boys were good Democrats last night, but it is quite likoly tbat by tbe time they finish their common school education roost of tbcm will be Republicans. Tin:   TOWNSHJI*; Ca&tanea-Governor, Delamater 33, Pattison 49; Lieut. Governor, Watres 33, Black 49; Secretary of Internal Ailaira, Stownrt 34, Barclay 48; Associate Judge, MoCroa 22, Clark 50; Congress, Hopkins 44, Elliott 37; State Souator, Malone 35, Meek 45; Assembly, Fredericks 31, Quiggle 50. Prothonotary. Jefloris 40, Brown �11. Sheriff, Best 23, Everbart 57. Treasurer, Loveland 17. Caldwell 05. Com-luisHiouers, F. M. Welsh 27, Kissel 30, Brosius 45, Mussina 52. Auditors, McGbee 29, Loit/.el 34, Moyer 52, Bridgens 47. Reriovo, West ward-Governor, Pattison 159; Delamater, 93. Lieutunaut Governor, Black 150, Watres 101, Si erotary of Infernal Allaire, Barclay 152, Stewart 101. Congress. Elliott 11$; Hopkins 131. Senator, Meek 125; Mflh'nu 121. Assembly, Quiggln 140; Fredericks 107. Prothonotary, Brown 152, Jettons 09. Sheriff, Everbart 100; Best Treasurer, Cald- well 151); Loveland 0. Associato Judge, Clark 51; McCrea 197. Com mJ�sioners, Brosius 143; Mussina 153; Welsh 101, Kissel 100. Auditors, Moyer 149; Biidgons 148, MeGhcii 103; LeUzell WZ. Middlo Ward-Governor, Pattison, 140; Delamater, 103; Lit'iitomiut Ouvemor, Black 145; Watres 101; Secretary ol Internal Affairs, Barclay U2, Siuwuil 1US; Congress, Elliott 135, Hopkins 115; Souator Meek 119, Malone 133; Assembly, tjuiggle 135; Fredericks US. Prothouotary, Brown 112, Jcfietis 10S. Sheriff, Everbart 107, Best 85. Treasurer, Caldwell 140, Loveland I0f). Associato Judg'o, Clark 55, McCrea 200. Commissioners, Brosius 130; Welsh 108. Kisselt 108. Runovo.-East Ward.-Governor, Pattison 195, Dtflamator 7C; Lieut. Governor. Black 193, Watres 72; Uuugn^N, Elliott 171, Hopkins 90; Senator, Meek 154, Malone lu7; Assembly, Quiaglo 17:'., Fredericks NO; Prothouotary, Brown 188; Jof-foriH 73; Sheriff, Everbart 195; B :i(Jgeus 181, McUliuo 77, Leit/.oll 70. A Check in a Bottle. Ed. Fargus, of Dunnstown, a well known riverman saw a bottle floating down the river which when it came to his hands he found it contained a check dated at Drury's Run Sept. 13, 1890. The check was on the First ^National bank payable to tbe finder aud was for a large sum. "Ed" would have had a windfall but for the fact that tbe signature was fictitious aud the check n. g. A Sftw Mill Accident. Harry Chatham was hurt at a saw mill on Paddy's Run yesterday. His left hand came in contact with a saw and the little fioger was cut off and the hand badly lascerated. Ho came to his home in Flemingtou whero Dr. Hayes gavo him surgical attendance. IleOheytm Instruction*. A verdant gentleman whose correspondence is limited received a letter upon the envelope of which was tho conventional business card: "Altar five days, return to --Tho epistlo was carefully perused and preserved m.til tbe expiration of the alotted five days, when it was returned to tbe writer. IttuuUtl�ti \>y III* rho^ograph. The photograph taken on Monday of the alleged Italian murderer, was forwarded to tbe Sheriff at Wellsburg, Va., and yesterday ho sent a telegram to Cbief West-brook saying tbat ho would conio on at once for tho prisoner. Tbe Sheriff identified tbe prisoner by the photograph. TakoD Homo for Burial. The body of Anthony Hoguo who was killed at a lumber job near North Bend on Monday, was taken to bis late home in Addison, New York, for interment. A brother ot the deceased camo ou and took ehirge of the remains. Tho deceased was a momborof tbe G. A. R. tilve L'� More Llgbj. The new electrio light company will make application to Council, at tbo special meeting Monday night, for privile^a to erect and maintain poles and wires in the city. After this franchise is granted the new company will be ready for business. Audrcwi Rtild. The dates forexhibitiug the oil paintings of Andrews Raid is November ISch and 19th. Admission 25 cents, children 15 cents.   Don't forgot the dates. Thunkrt Extended. Mr. and Mrs. David Gionett desire to return thanks to tho kiud friends who assisted them at the funeral of their child yesterday. "The Burglar" at the Opera House tonight. Go aud sue "True Grit." to-night. "I'ully" Fills tho Uotipti. Tho attraction offered by Kit tic Rboades and company I;iHt night was "Polly," and again the seating capacity of the Opera House was tested to its utmost. It is useless to speak of tbo merits of this organization as  its   drawing power  is   tbo It iieraJiltf  tbe   Comlu� t>r Tbe Policy So Htrnngly Advocated By the Kx-Freeident iitid   He   Already   Foreseen "TttrlfT form" K�lUututl on tho Uoriion-A IqK Comment ou liallot Reform. New Yokk, Nov. 5.-To an Associated PresB reporter, who asked for an expression of his opinion on tho results of ye&ter day's elections, Ex-Presideut Cleveland to-day said: "I am eslighted. I challenge the right of any man iu tbe country to rejoice more heartily than I over the results of yesterday. My gratification Is that of any American, proud of his fellow coun tryineu, who, though led away for a timo by party prejudices and by blind confidence in ouuning aud aelUsh leaders, could not bo deluded to their ruin. They have dem onstrated that, in dealing with them, it is not safe to calculate that tbey are stupid or heedless of the welfare of their countrymen. "The necessity of tariff reform, with its consequent reduction in the cost of living, and the duty of the Democratic party to advocate it, bas been fully demonstrated hy the action of the people yesterday. Their decision hai been deliberately made, and it is all the more significant because tbey have voted upon their reason and judgment, and because they have proved tfaac corruption is powerleBB as against their convictions. Of course there isnoth-ing for the Demooratic party to do but to push on tbe battle at all times and in all places on tbe lines which they have laid down. That ia, to insiat upon a wise adjustment of tariff taxation, to the reasonable needs of tho Governmeut, as opposed to tbe plan which enriches a favored class at tbo expense of the masses of the people. Until the viotory is won, the quettion of tariff reform will not be settled nor the pledges and professions of the Demooratic party to the people redeemed. Our party has made an honest and earnest fight. It bas planted itself upon disinterested and unselfish devotion to the interests of the people. Its absoluto unity and harmony upou the question of tariff teform shows its quick recognition of true Democratic principles, and its enthusiasm in a cause which involves the popular welfare. Everywhere our people have done magnificently, and the harvest they have gathered has been nttbly earned." i In answer to an inquiry as to his views on tbe operation of the ballot reform law Mr. Cleveland said: "I think there Bhould be no more opposition to the prinoiple of ballot reform. The evidence of its usefulness and benefit to tho people, I regard as conclusive. In some matters of detail the law in our state might, perhaps, be improved. It seems to me it would bo well to obviato the necessity for so many separate ballots, but after all, even tbis or othor similar objections are not vitally important. Tho thing upon which every honeat man Bhould congratulate himself is that we have a lav? which protoots our voters from corruption aud iutimidation, aud is one of thoBo measures of relief, which once adopted will not be surrendered. A I1EAKTY HAKn-KII4KE. VEKSONAL. James W. Dunn loft yesterday for tbo Soldiers Home at Marion, Ind. Mrs. A. L. Benedict left yesterday for Chattanooga, Tcnn., to visit relatives. Forroat Hartm?.n camo up from Williamsport to visit his parents and oaHt bis voto on Tuesfhiy. Mr. Samuel Keller, Democrat, has been elected HhurifT of Dauphin couuty by a majority of over 700. Thn county is strongly Republieau aud gavo Delamater nearly 1200 uiaj.nity. F. M. Ross wiii vacate bis office iu tbe Exchange building and it will be ocoupied by tho uow bank. Mr. Ross bas rented an office from Mr. Wiedhahn on Water street and will occupy it; in a abort timo. Institute Attractions. A circular issued by D. M. Bruogard, Superintendent of Public Schools of Clinton county, states tbat the finest course of entertainments the city of Lock Haven has ever had, will be given at the Court House and the Opera House, during tbo Institute, December 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th. Prof. James M. Coughlin will lecture iu tho Court House on tho opening evening of tho course, Decembor loth. His subject will be "Tho Legacy Wo Leave Our Children." Prof. Meloy will also on that evening exhibit aud explain tbe "phonograph" and "graphophono." Tuesday evening, December 10th, Mrs. Harriet E. Mouroe, of Philadelphia, will give her illustrated lecture, "A Review of tho Civil War." Wednesday evening, December 17ch, Robert Nourso, of Washington, D. C, will lecturo on "Johu aud Jonathan." Thursday evening, Decombor 18th, Geu-oral Thomas Dowling, of Alb.my, N. Y., will lecture on "The Good Old Times." Miss Amelia Foe, of Conueautsville, Pa., will be tho soprano soloist of tha Institute. She is an excellent vocalist, and will sing a number of charming songs at each evening's entertainment. Tbo day sessious of the Institute will be held iu tho Court Houso, aud all the oveniug entertainments after Monday night iu the Opera House. Addffus mi Prohibition. Rev. J. E. Weeks, Deputy Chief Templar, will speak in the Evangelical church on Sunday evening ou tho subject "What probibition does ia Kansas." All who are interested in temperance aro expected i to be present, and all will be welcome. The  Null on'* CliieT Executive Hae  � FJn� C nance For Muscular Development. New Vork Times. It would bo interesting to know how mauy people President Haiiison shook bauds with during his recent tour, and a statement of tbo number shaken hands with by a President during bis wholo term of office would bestartling indeed. Almost overy day, when ho is in Washington, the President comes down into tho East Room of the White House and goes through tbe pump handle act with a throng of people, frequently numbering more than a hundred, and his office each persou that approaches him must have his hand squeezed. When he goes on ajouruey he shakes hands all day and a Hrgo portion of the night, and on tho occasion of a public White House reception be greets warmly and cordially some two or three thousand people whom ho ubvor saw before aud will probably never see again. It is curious bow much pleasure the people who have tbe honor of receiving tho President's shake experience. Each one thinks he or she has made a distinct impression, and it ia tho effort of the President to convey this idea. What miguificeut muscular develop-meut there must boiu a President's right arm'. Leaving out at consideration his band-shaking, he signs his name hundreds and thousands of times each week. Every proclamation, every bill that passed Congress, overy message to Congress, every commission, every executive order, must bear his signature. Tho mere physical requirements of tbo Presidential office are extraordinary. President Harrison shakes hands as easily as he can. His grip ia not muscular, although it is warm. He has not got it down to such a fine point as his predecessor. President Cleveland had evidently studied the subject and adopted tbe shake calculated to involve tbe least possible exertion ou his part. It consisted in holding his hand straight out and permitting tbo person whose turn it was to seize it for a second, when it was resolutely withdrawn. The exertion of squeezing was thus avoided. President Arthur did not relish this part of his duties, aud he shook hands lightly and without enthusiasm. Gen. Garfield went into itbody and soul, and gave each person who came along tbe benefit of a hearty, warm squeeze that always left a favorable impression, and President Hayes did the best ho oould to attain the same end. Gen. Grant, like Gen. Sherman, shook hands with nearly every man, woman and child in tbe United States, but there was a vast difference in the two Generals' methods. Gen. Grant never loved tbe aot, and performed it in perfunctory way, whereas Gen. Sherman always grasps your hand heartily, and as though he loved ko do it. Of alt tbe living Americans of prominence be is the pleasantest to shake hands with. Thero is a cast of President Lincoln's hand by a noted American seulptor,which was made just after his nomination for the Presidency, and across the baok of tbo band thero is a distinct swelling caused by tbe congratulatory handshaking which he has gone through with. More recently wo have seen a President lamed for a tew days by this same ordeal, and the President's wife dreads it as a duty tbat is not only disagreeable, but after a time abso utely painful. NEWS   AND NOTES. A number of doctors and medical stu-deuts aro to watch Suoci. who begins his 45 days fast in New Vork this week. Thero have bean somo suspioions about some of hiB previous atmospheric, gorges, but there will probably be nothing loose about this fast. By a general order issued from tho War Departmeut tbo military prison at Fyrt Leavenworth, Kansas, is constituted an ludopendent military post, under tho immediate command of tho Major General commanding tbe army. President Harrisou has designated Assistant Secretary Nettleton to act as Secretary of the Troasury in tbo absence of Secretary Wiudoro, aud has also designated Assistant Secretary Spaulding to act as Secretary in the absence of both Mr.. Window aud Mr. Nettleton. Benjamin U. Ilubor, storekeeper and postmaster at Hubers, Lancaster county, Penna., was fouud shot dead in his storo yeBterday morning. Some time ago thioves entered the storo and Uuber arranged a spring gun to shoot them s'lould thoy return. The guu was found discharged this morning, and Hubor is bf-lieved to havo shot himself whilo sotting tho guu. A despatch from Scottdalu, Penna., says that 10,000 men, employes of tho Frick Coke Company, will lay down thoir tools this week lor tho reinstatement of Andrew Verostic, the discharged Tiptop Coko Works committeeman A long and bitter struggle is anticipated. The Knights of Labur omiiials openly declare their intention to carry tho strike to every plant in tho rvgum should it bo necessary. In tho District Court of Tacoroa, Washington, 0 udge Ilanford rendered a decision in the suit of tbe Catholic Bishop of Nc�-qually, to obtaiu tbo titlo to 430 acres of land occupied as a military reservation. Tho Court held that tbe claim of tho Uuited States Government to the lauds as reservation is prior in time, and for that reason, if for no other, superior in equity tothaxol tbe plaintiff. An tappeal was taken to tbe United StaTes Supreme Court,   

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