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Lock Haven Express: Thursday, October 2, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - October 2, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                 v* <$M&1? #1 NINTH YEAK-NO. 1853. LOCK HAVEN, PA.. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 2. 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS S?iNGE�^ESS! ADJOURNMENT OF 3S INSI,OK ItILIJTItKKS - CURRENT  COMMENT. Aii'vt the only people who remember the New York Central strike now arc the racti who lost their places by it. With the Tariff bill mil or the way, the Republican party is ready for any other largo' contracts the country may have to offer. The rumors of impending famine in Iro. land owing to the failure of tho potato crop are confirmed. It is said that not loss than one million human beings are on the vergo of starvation. The Loudon times predicts that the McKinley Tariff law "will do gravo barm to America and dislocate the general in dustrics of tho world. America will be tho chief sufferer in the end." "Well, wo will take iho chances. TLe First Session of the Fifty-first Congress a Thine: of tho Fast. The long-delayed nomination of a (Jus toms Collector at Portland-that delay being duo to the fact that Speaker Heed on the one hand, and the Blaine interest on tho other baud, each had a man for tho place-has been finally settled by the choice of tho Blaine man. The Speaker has claimed this appointment as ouo of the local perquisites nf his < 'oncrossional office, but tho result would scorn to show that the counsel of tho Secretary of State haB carried the nay at the White House. Out of a population of about 0-1,090,000, some 100,000 annuallyraako what is called tho tour of the Old World. These run over Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Some visit still othor European countries, but it is asserted that all told only about five thousand have visited Palestine in the past twenty years, or say a quarter of one per cent, of tbe annual volume of travel. Less than live per cent, go to Rome and only two per cent, to Athens. How many visit Egypt is not stated. There is n hurried rush and a hasty return. Pottstown seems i-j be blessed with a very virile lot of clergymen. Two of tbem visited the fair grounds while that institution wag in progress, and, after noting the presence of innumerable gamblers and fakirs plying their several games, swore out warrants for their arrest, as well as for one of the oilicers of tbe society. Th aotion has much inoensed the fair managers, but tho community rather enjoys the affair. But this was not all. These clergymen on last Sunday took [or the text of their sermons, *"'Tho Fair, the Gamblers, the Polico, the Clergy," and in tarn gave all these classes an overhauling. The vacancy in the important oibx-s of First Assistant Postmaster-General, caused by the resignation of tho active and exuberant Clarkson, has been filled according to strict business principles in the civil service. Tho President has raised to this office the Second Assistant Postmas-tar-Genora!, White field, who was formerly an efficient postmaster at Cincinnati, and has given the second assistant place to Mr. J. Lowrie Bel!, at present superintendent of the Railway Mail Service, and tho most competent man that ever held that position. Postmaster General Wan-amaker now has two thoroughly-trained tnou iu the chief places of the Post-office Department, and his own good judgment can he easily recogirzed in tho changes. Samuel .J. Rajjdali/s estate, so small that ho did not even think it worth while to make a will, amounts to only $5,000 worth of personal ^fleets, oi the equivalent of just one year'?; salary as a member of House, in which he has served the country for a quarter of a century. This fact is not only tho most emphatic lesiimony to the integrity of the great statesman, but teaches tho lesson that public servants should be. better paid in order to obtain the best service, Men of the ability and integrity demanded in Congress cannot afford to give years of eonliuuous setvlce at the salary paid and with all the expenses incumbent, unless thoy have an iudcjiuim ent income outside of their salary. All mcu are not as honest as Sara Randall, and many who undertake to keep up their position on the salary paid are driven to become the tools ol the lobby. The fit jilt at liuiMlnj;. The dimensions aroa&follows: Length, 701 feet and four inches. Breadth, from 121 to 32*1 feet, it covers 153,112 square feet- From base line of building to tip of Btatuc, 2S7 feet and eleven inches. Cost, over $13,000,000. The building is of tho Coriuthjun order. Material of cunUv.l building, yeiiowiiu sandstone piiuU-d v.hitti; that of tho viugh, wbl*o nmb!<-, slightly tin'.td w*U til"-, whilo tho dome ia ol jrou. Th-j c.irw-t ;-i r.iv '�vti la. i '.u 17 W. HI i j.-ionury Meclhif,'. Mrs, .7. j*, (-ushiug. State S�:i; Pcnnsyu'uu;-; of  ih--*  V, maul  Voi'd-'/ji  Misf*;oiia notary iur lecturo it. i.lio l^jiLmt oburoii uu Friday evening on missiouH. Sirs. Gushing is a roturned missionary aud aa accomplished spoakor. All iuteiestud in missiODa generally are invited. 0L0SIEG SCENES OF THE SESSION A liltter Uemocrcitic nttiwkon Speaker Rocrt and a  Vlj-oronft  Republican   Defon k; si>   m'c! iu!:.   Agreed   to.   T!m: Sp-.alicr laid bi;for'; the House lei Mrs from Mns-rK Conger, Iowa and DcHaveu, Call forr,;a, Kiting that they had forwarded to t>? Gov.:ruon; of their States their rcsigna-i m>dh as ii'prcFCntativcs. Several mt'tm-poti; hllmlu:phlii...ii7 i'kthlm-y.........." i Cleveland..........1 i; ii 11 alo............H't m A.M EKJCAN ASSOCIATION. Won. I,ost.i                  "Won. Lout. XjiuiUvJlIe........Tit    ii    JToledo.....-.......m   f>s ttt. LuUls..........7")     51      Athletic...........55    fi!> Columbus.........Th    5t    Syracuse..........ik   70 Kochester........ti>    57   '.Baltimore........:�7    78 Tho Conpreaaionu! Conference. The Republican Cougrosuioual Conferees roassombled in their room at tho Park Hotel, Williamsport, at 5 o'clock lata evening. Tho eoufui'cnco without any ballots being taken, wa3 adjourned until 9 o'clock this morning. At that hour tho conferees met and pr-icot-ded to ballot for a candidate. By n-h'phono it is learned that Ly-(.��juiiug'H .-Cnfereca ;tro favorablo to tho nomination d A. C, Kopkius bnt tho result of the '..'jiilotinji could not bo learned. Tbe conference adjourned without making i nomination, until - o'clock this afternoon '.>heu Wdioting would be resumed. Ufcmori.iuc Senatorial Conforonce. lho Dcujoo:j.Uo beuaioriiil confercoa from thia county went to Tyrone to-day, where another mooting uf the Senatorial con femes from this district will bo held to-day. The conference mot at 1 o'clock this a/ternoon. AN OVATION TO DELAMATERI IDENTIFICATION"   NliCESSAKT. The Republicans of Clinton County Accord Tlioir Cr.niMatc a Hearty Wolcomo. ' THE COURT HOUSE DENSELY PACKED To risten to the Eloquent ArirenfteN mf the DUtiiieuiAhed Visitors-rarty Frinrlplctf Stronc'y Kmloraeil-Tue (Jrundast plaj of Oratory Ever Heard In the County. The Republican* of CliDton county gave their candidate for Governor an enthusiastic greeting and filled tho court room to its doors at the mass meeting last night. Tho special train conveying Senator Dela-mator, his colleagues and associates to thia city from Williamsport, arrived hero i shortly after six o'clock aud from that \ hour up to tho time for the speech making at tho Court Houso to commence, the time of tho next Governor was taken up in returning tho greetings of his friends at tho Fallon House. There were were iucludod iu tho party who accompanied Senator Dolamater, the candidato for Lieutenant Governor, Hon. Louis Watres; candidate for Secretary of Internal Affairs, Thomas J. Stewart; City Solicitor Warwick, of Phiiadelphi; Senator A. I). Harlan, of Chester; District Attorney George S. Graham, of Philadelphia, and a number of othor prominent Republicans. The Mill Hall bund with molodious strains, led the march from the Fallon House to the Court House where every available seat was quickly taken and hundreds were unable to find even standing room. Thero wero many ladies in the audience, and prominent Democrats were scattered liberally among the closely packod throng that had gathered to hear tho speeches. Thero wero many regrets that the meeting had not been held out doors, in order that all might have had the pleasure of listening to tho discussion of tho issues of the campaign by Republican speakers. The mooting was called to order by County Chairman Malone, after whioh W. O. Kress, Esq., was elected Chairman of tho meoting, and H. G. Allen, Joseph GrailuB, tieorge R. McCroa. and J. R. Lesher elected Vice Presidents. Tho secretaries were H. T. Hall and S. M. McCormick. Senator Dclamater was tho first speaker of the evening. The other speakers wore J. Levering Jones, Hon. Louis Watres, ThomaBJ. Stewart, George S. Graham, and City Solicitor Warwick, of Philadelphia. For several hours these gentlemen talked foroibly and eloquently, holding the closest attention of the groat mass of humauity that filled the room until the last word had been said. Bursts of applause frequently interrupted the speakers, and fairly shook the walla of the Temple of Justice. There were many farmers present and tho prominent officers of several granges were close followers ol tho discourses, and judging from the pleased expression on their faces and their enthusiastic applause the statements of the speakers met with their hearty approval. Tho apoakers wero eloquent and instructive and it is seldom that an opportunity is afforded the people of Lock Haven and vicinity to liston to Buch a grand display of oratory as ou this occasion. Tho meetiDg was a grand success, the orations wore masterly efforts, and tho greeting given Souator Delaroator such as proved beyond a doubt that the Republicans of Clinton county are united, enthusiastic and proud of their standard bearer, Senator George W. Delamator. Circus Day, The town was filled with visitors yesterday and there was the usual excitement attending "Show Day," and especially when tho show is a big ono as was the case iu this instance. The special train by which Kingl'mg Brothors travel was late in arriving aud the small boys who were on hand at daybreak in the morniug to see tho wagons and olepuauta taken from the ears had a long and tedious wait. Tho day was fine aud the weather all that could be desired. Long before tho hour for tho parade the sidewalks wore packed solidly with a good uatured crowd of men, women and children, a large number of them being country folks. The parade was fino aud better than is usually seen, Tho horses wero remarkably fine animals and attracted much attention from horsemen. At the aftornoon and evening exhibitions tho crowds were large aud tho performance all that was claimed. The day panned without accident and thero was no disorder on the streets. Tont JYieeUiiKf) Discontinued. The Adveutisi 3 have takon down their tout at Flemingtou aud have Eecu.cd tho room known as Keller's stoic, in whioh meetings will be hald during tho winter. The room has beou furnished with soalrf, and tho first services will bo held iu it this evening. Thore will also be services on Saturday and Sunday evenings. Elder Raymond will be at Fleming ton next Tuesday. Slui Hot It from Hie Cashier Himeuir Th�a nud Tlioro. From Drake's Magazine. 'You'll have to bo identified before I can cash this check for you, madam," said tho pompous cashier of a down-town bank to a tall, leathery, hooked-nosed woman tn a gre^n and rod aud blue dross and before-the-war bonnet, who presontod hoisBlf at his window ono afternoon when the rush of business was greatest. "I-dentified ! whatrs that?" asked the woman. "Why, that you'll have to bring some one here who knows you. to be tho person named on this check." "Well, I-I-why-I-no, it oan't be ! yea, it is, too.  Ain't you Henry Smith?" "That is my name, madam," he replied, ooldly. "I knowod it, aud you don't reckomom-ber me, Hen ? Look at me agin. I'm changed some, an" so air you, but I jist knowed I'd seen you afore the minnit I clapped eyes on ye. You've got that same old cast iu your left eye and your nose still crooks a little to the left and you're a Smith all over. An you don't know me? Don't rockomember Salindy Spratt that you usoter to coax to become Salindy Smith? Hee, hoe, hee! 'Member me now, don't ye, Hen ? 'Member how ye useter haul me to school on you sled an' kiss mo in the Vane an' call me your little true love when we wuzboy an'gal together ? 'Member how you cut up 'cause I give ye the mitten an' took up with Li Link, whose wife I now bo? Land, Rod, I could stand here all day talkin' over them old times back ou the farm, but I reckon you are busy now. You kin i-dontify me now, can't yon, Hen ?" "Hen" did so, but in a mood that almost produced, apoplexy, and those who witnessed the reunion of these long-separated friends wondered that "Hen's" glance of identification did not strike Salindy Spratt Link dead. ANOTHER STEP FORWARD. An Organization That V/ili Piovo of Great Importance! to tho City. 1 TEUST AUD SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY Jarbona Monday Xlfiht. On Monday night comes Jarbeau In "Starlight." Thero is a lack of language, or rather a challenge to thought and ideas, when it is demanded to classify the lively Vernona Jarbeau with any familiarly defined methods of comedy. She is a soubrette at one moment, a buries quer the next instant, then a sprightly comedienne. Her action bubbles with intensity, suppleness and most magnetic and attractive vivacity. While on the stage she is in constant motion. She can sing, delight you with her liquid, dancing eyes, swing her arms in moist expressive gestures and keeps hor little form in most graceful and sinuous motion-all at the samo time. So lively is this bright little woman that it is impossible almost to conceive all tho ex-pessiou she is capable of. She labors mentally and physically. There is remarkable puissance, marked individual in-goniouBuess, and an effervescent dash in her style, with an odor of spirit that intoxicates and thou bewilders. A Good Shu'.T Attracts Largo Crowd*. Ringliug Brothors1 monster shows attracted large crowds yesterday afternoon and evening and we have failed to hoar of ono person but what was well satisfied with the entire performance. The stock was in excellent condition, tho monagerio, while not large, was clean, well kept and contained a number of rare specimens. Thero was but ouo ring but the performance given therein was one of the best ever seen in the city. The largo audiencos wore not annoyed by poanut venders or fakirs of any kind which is auother step in the right dirootion taken by the Messrs. Ringling Brothors. Everything moved along with clook-like regularity and tho management have gained a reputation that will accord them tho same liberal patronago should they return at any futuie time. PERSONAL   FKNCILINGS. Mr. .Joseph Sipes returned yesterday from a trip to Baltimore and Washington. Kov. Robbins, a former pastor of tho M. E. church at Ueuovo, is visiting friends in this city. Miss May Nowell having closed hor school at Cook's Ruu will teach the winter term at Dunnsburg. Editor John Grior, of tho Jersey Shore Videltc, attended tho big mass meeting in tbe Court House last night. Dr. W. J. Shooraakor yostorday remov-od a largo oneyatod tumor from tho brow of Mrs. Irvin Schemer, of Mill Ilali. Mr. Jos. R. Mann, General Supt. for the American Ave it Tool Co., located at Pittsburg, >a the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mid. It. Maun, this week. State Secretary [lurlburt who will assist in organizing the Y. M. C. A. in this city to night arrived on Bald Eagle V-illey mail a' 11 o'clock this forenoon. Mr. Charles Soy moor, a former resident of Lack Haven, has been vistiiug friends aud acquaintances hero for Boveral days. Yesterday he returned to his homo at Pittsburg, accompanied by.his daughter, Misa Baltic Seymour, who will make that city her future homo. Organized With  an  Atithoiized  Capital of �'^50.lMK>-Tho Hoard  �r I>1 rectors and Oilicers Composed of a Number of Oar Mont Successful  BueiaeHg Men and  F uanclere. Notice of an intended application to the Governor of the Commonwealth for � charter for a Trust and Safe Deposit Company to be located in Look Haven, have recently been published iu the Express. The company was organized yesterday with an authorized capital ef $250,000, of which however but 125,000 will be issued at this time. Tho Board of Direotora aro as follows: H. T. Harvey, President; Jacob Scott, First Vice President; Robert H. Furst, Second Vice President; Jacob Browo, Joseph W. Merrey, Robert Mann, Peter Knecht, James C. Smith, W. II. Brown, CharleB Corss, Thomas H. Harmon, F. M. Ross, W. B. Holloway. Samuol E. Walker and George D. Hess. Thomas R. Mann was elected Treasurer and Charles Corss, Esq., Solicitor. A committoe of Directors was appointed to look after a suitable room, as it is the intention of the company to proceed at once to tho completion of their organization, aud begin business. By reference to the names of the officers elected yesterday it will be seen that a considerable number of most successful business men and Cnanciers are interested in the new concern and have tho matter of its success in hand. For the information of the readers of the ExruESS it may be well to state that companies of this character have become very popular within the last few years iu Pennsylvania. They have been found to be not only profitable to the stockholders, but a very great convenience to the business interests of the communities in which they are established, as well as furnishing an exceptionably safe depository for money upon which depositors may receive a small amount of interest. Trust and safe deposit companies reoeivo money on deposit subject to cheque tho same as an ordinary bank, but unlike other banks they allow interest of about 2 por cent, on deposits subject to cheque. They also receive money for which they issue certificates tho deposits not being subject to cheque and upon which they pay 2* or 3 per cent, interest. They loan money on mortgages, judgments, aud any othor collaterals that have a fixed market value and also buy notes, bonds, etc., issue titles to real estate against incumbrances or defects in titles. In fact they possess many attractive features which make an organization of this kind in this city of the very first importance. Y. M. C. A. MooliDR. A meeting for tho permanent organization of the Young Meu's Christian Association will be hold this evening at 7:30 o'clock in their room, lately occupied by the Board ofTradc, Grove street, to which all who are intarestsd, especially the youug men, are cordially invited to be present. As it is tho intention of tho Association to (it up rooms especially adapt-ud for gymnastic training it will be of groat benefit to all who become members. Remember the hour 7:30 this evoning. The Mystery Solved. From tho Altoona papers it is learned that the man named Stanton, about whose doath at Marcelinc. Mo., several letters were published iu the papers of this city, belonged at Altoona. His name was Edwin Stantoo Dysart, aud a tolcgram received by a Mr. Amies, of Altoona, from Marceline, states that appearances seem to indicate that Dysart was murdered. MutMiiuH Christ** Fminntl. The funeriU services over the remains of tho lato Mr. Christ wore conducted by Rdv. J. A. Wood, Jr., assisted by Rev. Joseph Nesbitt, on Tuesday. Tho pall bearors wero B. F. Thompson, Josiah Candor, J. G. Harris, D-iuiol Bogeorief, M. B. Herring and J. Shoemaker. Interment was made in Highland cemctory. Excnriion to Philip&burg. Tho Odd Fellows excursion from this city toPhilipsbuigno Wednesday tho 15th iust. will leave here in tho morning of that d;\y, over tho Beech Creek railroad. The fare for tho round trip will be $2 10, tickets good fur two days. Persons who desire to return homo that night can do so as a sppcial train will bo run for that purpose. M�ct iRR for l�i ill. AH members of Canton Lock Haven, No. 20 I. O. (). F., ;iro requested to meet for drill to morrow  evening at 8 o'clock. MOUNT ADAMS' HiOZHN' �AVJ�S. AH are invited to atteud^the meeting of the Y. M. C. x\. to-night. Y. M. C. A. at 7:30 to-night. A Croat Supply of Iv.e Too l-'ar Away to lie of FnlriU* Srrvico. I'Yom the Spokane Falls Review. Away np 4,000 feet above the Columbia river, at the base of Mount Adams, whose symmetrical cono-Hke peak is covered with perpetual snow, lies a beautiful little lake surrounded by broad meadows and fed by a stream of purest wator, taking its riso in tho snow fields ten or twelve miles away. The oaves are within a few miles of Trout lake, for so this mountain gem, like hundreds of others in this wonderful country of lakes, is called^ for1 tb'e reason that trout filled basins are so common that the discoverer, averse � to>. taxing his brain for an original name, 'has seen fit to dub his find with his first thonght. Ae yet only six large oaves havo boon discovered, but as the whole conutry gives forth a hollow, reverberating sound to' the heel tap of tho hobnail raouutain shoo of the visitor, it is highly probable there are many more.    . One of these ice caves, the largest one, is uaed by the t armors as a cold storage warehouse for butter and milk, and certainly answers the purpose-admirably. The entrance is like into, a cistern and the adventurist leaves himself into the chilly atmosphere by means of a rope. The interior of the^cave is composed of one large apartment about eighty foot square'. Tho cave, is walled with ice,-around, above and below; with huge icicles of ' stalaotito and stalagmite formation, obstructing a complete view, as well as forming obstacles to exploration, but affording the most gorgeous pictures in the light of a flaming pitch torch. �  .... - The effect is simply indescribable, but at the same time most fascinating, especially when seen on a hot August d,ay. The huge pendants of pure, translucent ice reflect and scintillate the ruddy.glowof the touch 'id a bewildering maze, ot color and a thousand rays of light.: The air isaclear, dry cold, even-ou the hottest day. .There is no dampness or moisture. The yse is not molting, but it is hard aud,cold and dry as in midwinter.. A few. mpmonte in the cave and one's- very blood is- philled, a fact which is as yet, no doubt, the .cause of a thorough exploration of the, cave never having been made. Thererare,,.perhaps, other and adjoining  caverns, , whioh very probably open out from > the main apartment and form an Icelandic labyrinth. Otneors Elected. , Sugar Valley Lodge, No. 829I.O.O. P., has elected the following _offioer� for the ensuing term: N. g.-c, Aj .-Weaver; V. G., John-Brown; Treaa.r;J.!rB. -Barnor; Secty., Wm. F. Moyer; R�c.-Secry., C. T. Royer; Rep, to the Grand Lodge of Pa., Wm. F. Moyer; Trustae, J.* P. Earner. Installation of ofncera�on Oot. 4th, by J. P. Anthony, D. D. G. M., of Look Haven. NEWS   ASO NOTES. Mrs. Mary Loveland Hoyt, wifd of ox-Governor Henry M. Hoyt, died.in* Wilkes-barre, Panirt, of paralysis, aged- 51 years. At a meeting of the stockholders of the lace factory, in Wilkesbarro, Pa,, Tuesday, the capital stock of the company was increased from $'300,000 to $500,000; In the House Tuesday on motion of Mr. Bingham, of Pennsylvania, the joint resolution appropriating $10,000 to enable the Postmaster Geueral to test the .free delivery system in small towns and villages was passed. Raphael �fc Leweobnrg, dealers and manufacturers of oloakinga in Boston, have made an assignment. Tbe -liabilities aro estimated at about $200,000. There are creditors in Philadelphia, New York and Boston. In Lowell,MassaohusettsVTueaday, John Q. Nichols shot and fatally wounded his sister, Mrs. Ida Cunningham, and then shot himself in tbe head. Tbe wound is thought to be fatil. Fiuauctal matters caused tho shooting. At tho country residence of M. L. Davins, near Des Moines, Iowa, on Sunday, James Devins picked up a belt containing a revolver, to inspect it. Tho weapon fell to tho iloor and exploded. The ball enterod Mrs. Joun Dtjvios's breast, causiug death almost instantly. Foreman Henry, ot tt\o Wyoming Valley Stone Works, at Mesboppen, Pa., Tuesday eveuiug, walked to the Riverside Hotel with his wife, there met a young stoue-outtor named Leslie Kellogg, and shot and fatally wounded him. Another shot slightly wounded John Lord, a hostler. No cause is assigned for tbe shooting. Goneral Jubal A. Early was standing in front of a building whioh had been partially burned recently, in Lynchburg, Virginia, when, without warning, tho wall fell, buryiug him in a mass of debris. Ho was rescued in about 20 minutes, only slightly iiurt, from under some large timbers, which hold tho debris off of his body. An employe of one of the railroads lead-klg iuto Troy, New York, was tarred and feathered on Monday night by a party of masked men, led on by an indignant and outraged woman. The man is charged by those who took him in baud with having treated his wife cruelly, compelling her to procure a divorce from him. In defiance of the mandate of the Court be was married again a few days ago. Ou his w^y home Monday night with his bride h� carnage was stopped by a dozen masked men, who dragged him struggling into an adjoining field and gave him a coat of tar and feathers.   

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