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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: August 15, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - August 15, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAH-NO. 142. LOCK HAVEN, PA.. FBI DAY. AUGUST 15, 1890. PEICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS kinsi.ok iihotiikks - ___PUBLISHERS CURRENT COMMENT. Remember that September 4th is the last day to get registered. Don't neglect this duty and thereby loBe your vote. The Farmers' Allianoe is one of the "olouds" a good deal bigger than a man's band, on the political horizon. Mr. MoKinley declares himself in favor of reciprocity that will assure us a dollar profit for every dollar of concession. So say wo, all of us. When capital aud labor understand that oacb is the othor's best friend there will be an end of strikes, of demands, of oppression, of successful outside interference.   _ Jc iik Berks, the leader who bad charge of the great London Btrike several months ago, has put himself on record as saying that the good results of a strike, when there are good results, do not compensate the strikers for their losses. Senator Quat, in his quiet way, has introduced a resolution which has for its object the disouBBing and passing of the Tariff bill and an adjournment about September 1st. The resolution is wise, and if its object is accomplished all good oiti-zens will rejoice. TheT statement that there is neither school bonse nor church in Perry county, Kentucky, accounts for the hundreds of murders which have occurred there, the attempted assassination of the Judge and the burning of the Court House. There have been no religious services held there during the past two years. The vitality of the churches all over the country iB conspicuously shown by the work they are doing apart from the pulpit, font and altar. Since the beginning of 18S8, in New York city alone, the Episcopal church has spent $1,4S5,000, the Koman Catholic SI, 134,000, the Presbyterian $480,000, and the Methodist Episcopal $275,000, upon cburoh edifices. Such activity denotes the growth of religious faith, not of doubt. English capitalists who organize syndicates have become more discriminating as to their investments. The number of properties offered in the London market is immense, but when the experts come over to make examinations the facts don't come up to the figures evolved from the inner consciousness of the proprietors. The chill to British investments in the Argentine Republic has left more fnnds for permanent investment here. Although more cautious than heretofore, John Bull is still willing to put his money in American properties which show up well. PERSONAL   PKNCIL 1NG8. CLOSING UP THE BUSINESS Much Eoutino Work Punctured By Several Pleasant Events. THE COMMITTEE EEP0ETS DISCUSSED Latent   Gossip    Abont   Yon    and     Your Frlendn. Mrs. IIal Klapp and daughter havo returned from a visit to Asbury Park. Mrs. P. G. Knights and daughter Laura were visitors in WilHamBport yesterday. Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Glenn returned this morning from their visit to the sea shore. Jlrs. Best and Mrs. .1. L, Atkins, of Washington, D. C, are visiting Lock Ila-ven friends. Rev. R. W. Perkins will exchange pulpits next Sunday with Rev. Redding, of William b port. W. II. Painter, of St. Louis, is visiting his brother in this city alter an absence of thirfcy-fivo years. W. Frank Smith, of this city, has been elected principal of the public school at Now Bethlehem, Pa. W. CrKress, Eeq., and A. C. Hopkins were among the passengers arriving on Erie mail this morning. Joseph Paul, the veteran plasterer, is at work on the interior of Young & Brother's new oigar faetory at Farrandaville. Mrs. N. J. Mitohell, who has been ill for some time at Harrisburg has had a relapse and her mother Mrs. Or. Vanderaloot will leave to-morrow tnorniDg for Ilarxisburg to assist in taking care of her daughter. Mrs. I>r. Byron Clark and son John B. will spend the balance of August with the Doctor and his assistant, on his professional visits to Renovo, Lock Haven, Williams-port aud other points in the Lycoming Valley. See the Doctor's advertisement for dates. The Disability Pension KM Referred to an the Most Liberal Ever Paefled by any legislative Body in the World-The Address of the Commander-in-Chief Heartily Commended. Boston, August 14. The report of the Pension Committee submitted to the G. A. R. men to-day, details the work of its members in securing and aiding pension legislation in Congress, and its successful effort in regard to the Disability pension bill that became a law July 27. "This law," says the report, "while not in pre^ eise form of the bill presented by the committee, preserves the most important fea tares thereof, and while not just what was asked, is the most liberal pension measure ever passed by any legislative body in the world, and will place upon the rolls all of the survivors of the war whose conditions of health are not practically perfect. The commit tee on changes in the rules and regulations presented its report, rco-ommending various ebanges. A minority report in favor of adopting the resolution offered by the department of Massachusetts, providing for the substitution of the old ritual for the present one, was adopted by a large majority. The committee reported adversely on the proposition to change the rules, so that hereafter Past Department Commanders shall not be entitled to seats in the National encampment.  Adopted. toe commander's addkess. The committee on the address of the; Commander-in-Chief presented its report, heartily commonding the address and thoroughly indorsing the just policy set forth in the following passage: "It has been my determination to recognize as a comrade the equal rights of every man, no matter what his color or nationality, provided he has the two qualifications, service and an honorable discharge. In this groat struggle of life tho strong should aid the weak. It enables the former and helps to elevate the latter." tt1e work about over. Aside from the session of the National Encampment and Woman's Relief Corps, tho greater part of the G. A. R. oelebra-tion is over. The number of reunions today is comparatively few, and courtesies to visitors, while numerous, are decreasing in ex ton t. Some Posts have already left for home. the woman's relief corps. The afternoon session of the Woman's Relief Corps convention opened at 2:30. It was decided to invite all organizations who desire to work for the Union Veteran and his destitute children to come under the banner of the Woman's Relief Corps, auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic. Hereafter a member of the W. R. C. will not connect themselves, with other organizations opposed to the admission of loyal women and the members of such societies shall not be eligible to membership in the W. R. C. Mrs. McHenry, of Iowa, was elected National President. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Turner, of Massachsetts, was unanimously elected Senior Vice President. time, he would turn and study his good cousin's example. He would read the living Bible, and said to himself. "How does it happen that she, who has not as much knowledge or as much strength of character as I have can do what I can't do? She must have some help that I don't know of. It must be as she says, the help of God. I will seek that help." He went into his chamber and prayed to that God whose very ex istence he had denied. He prayed earn estly. God heard him, helped him, and he became a Christian.-Christian. TRAINS RUNNING REGULARLY. Vice President Webb Says That the Only Difficulty Is at Albany. New York, An?. 14.-The Grand Central depot had fairly assumed its normal appearance this morning. Vice President Webb was in his office early this morning reading the messages from points along tbo line. He said everything is going on smoothly except at East Albany. If the yards were clear at Albany, he said, all freight could be handled without the slightest difficulty. He thinks the authorities have been lax in their efforts to preserve order. Continuing, he said: "If I had Inspector Williams up at Albany for half a day you can bet the yards would be cleared, and our freight service would be restored in quick time, but I expect that in a day or two order will be restored Albany." Lock Haven Itoat Club. The Lock Haven Boat Club was organized a few days ago with 2G members. The olub starts out under most favorable chcumstauoQa, having six four oared St. Lawrence bouts and a floating boat house. The officers arc: W. A. Simpson, Jr., president; E. B. Shoemaker, vico presided, John Chrifr', .secretary; B. W. Fred ericks, trer^tirci: John F. MoCoiniick, commodoro. SI cvLiug Ta-N"i(^it. A regular meeting of tbe members of the Ancient Order of United Workmen will be held this evening at 8 o'clock. As business of importance will be transacted every member Is urged to attend. The Power of � Living liible. Nowhere is it more true than in the Christian life that actions spoak louder than words. A young man had become an inQdel, and would no longer read the printed bible, but ho could not help seeing tbe fruits of faith in the life of another. The Young Men'a Christian. Magazine tolls the result: In his father's house a young lady resided who was a relative of the family. Her fretful temper made all around her uncomfortable. She was sent to a boarding school and was absent some time. While thero she became a true and earnest Christian. On her return she was bo changed that all who knew her wondered and rejoiced. She was patient and cheerful, kind, unselfish and charitable. The lips that used to bo always uttariug cross and bitter words now spoko nothing but sweet and loving Words. Her infidel cousin George waB greatly surprised at this. He watched her closely lor some time, till he was thoroughly satisfied that it was a real change that had taken place in his young cousin. Then he asked her what had caused this great change. She told him it was tbe grace of Gud which had made hor a Christian and had changed Ler heart. Ho said to himself, "I don't believe that Ood has anjthiog to do with it, though uhe thinks ho bus. But it is a wouderful change thai hub taken place iu her, and I niioiild like tu be as good as hho is. I will bo so." Then ho formed a Kt.t of good resolutions. lie tried to control bis tuogue and bis temper, and keep strict watch over himself. He was all the time doing and saying what ho did not wish to J do and say.  And as he failed time aftor The Situation at Albany Improved. Albany, Aug. 14,-Master Workman Lee returned from New York this morning. He claimed to be satisfied with the condition of things in New York and this vicinity, and is going on to Buffalo tonight in response to an urgent request of the strikers there. Tbe first freight train since Friday left West Albany freight yard bound west at 2:45 this afternoon. There, was no disturbance whatever. The conditions in the Delaware and Hudson strike have not materially changed. No freight has been moved out of Albany to-day on that road. Superintendent Hammond at 3 o'clock said the men had not yet returned to work. Thoir committee had just left him'and were told be would not treat with them any more, but would only meet men individually hereafter. At 4 o'clock this afternoon it was stated on reliable authority that the Delaware and Hudson strikers had agreed to resume work to-morrow morning. The hundred yard men who were out on strike on tho Delaware and Hudson road at this point, have agreed ro return to work. The night force went on at G o'clock to-night and the day force will go on al 8 o'clock to-morrow morning. Crossed Over. Died.-At his residence in this city, on Thursday morning, July 31, 1890, Dr. Henry Essig, in the 83d year ot his life. Dr. Henry Essig was born in Fredericksburg, Pa., June 4th, 1808. After completing bis education in the medical de-paitment of the University of Pennsylvania he settled in Plattsburg, in 183G, preceding his father, Dr. Noah F. Essig, one year, and at the time of his death was the oldest resident of our city.-Plattsburg, (Mo.) Je]}'ern(/7iian, of August 6th. Dr. Henry Essig was a resident of this county and kept store in FlemiDgton in 1834 and 1835. _ Union Y�t�mu Legion Notice* Comrades: I have received an invitation for Encampment No. 71 from Soldier's Orphan Sixteenors to join them, tbe U. V. L., Reno Poet G. A. R., and Sons of Vetr erans of Williarasport, in a basket picnio at Nippeno Park, Wednesday August 20, I hope every member of tbe Legion will turn out. We are all interested in the ixteenrs. A rattling good time is assured all veterans who attend. W. W. Richie, Col. Commander. What Altered the Case. Krom Harper's. Hazar, "Papa," said the young mother, "I've decided on a name for baby; we will oall her Imogen." Papa was lost iu thought for a few minutes; be did not like the name-but if he opposed it, his wife would have her own way. "That's nice," said ho presently. "My first sweetheart was named Imogen, and she will take it as a compliment." 1' We will call her Mary, after my mother," was the stern reply. Fnneral Notice. The funeral of Mrs. John Brendle will take plaoe Sunday afternoon, Tbe friends and neighbors are requested to meet at tbe houso, No. 305 East Bald street, at 1:30 p. in., and proceed to the Reformed church, where funeral services will be con-ducted at 2 o'clock by Rev. G. W. Gerhard. TERSELY TOLD HAPPENINGS. Ali;tho Late News and Views of the City Up to 3:00 P. It GOTTEN UP IN A BEAOABLE FORM Important  Consolidation-Accident at the Normal-A Colored Wotn.n to Lecture Broke BU Los-Entered � Convent-Glen Union Item-tock Hnven Bomt Clob-AnsUn Scourged by Fire. The New York and Pennsylvania Company, a corporation formed under the laws of Pennsylvaniawith aoapital of (1,800,000 has purchased the Clarion Palp and Paper Company, of Johnsonburg, Pa.; the Peon sylvania Pnlp and Paper Company, of Look Haven, Pa., and the Champlain Fibre Co., of Willsborougb, N. T. This is really a consolidation, as no new oapital has been contributed and the three corporations in the consolidation will liquidate as separate concerns as soon as possible. Tbe officers of the new company are tbe owners of the old companies and are: President, A. Ot. Paine, President of Champlain Fibre Company; Vice Presidents, M. H. Armstrong, President of Clarion Pnlp and Paper Company; L. I). Armstrong, President of the Pennsylvania Pulp and Paper Company, and A. G. Paine, Jr., Vice President of the Champlain Fibre Company and of the Clarion Pulp and Paper Company; Secretary and Treasurer, John W. Welch, of Hartford, Conn.; General Manager, L. D. Armstrong and Directors A. G. Paine, L. D. Armstrong, M. M. Armstrong, A. G. Paine, Jr., and Robert Wetherill & Co., Cheater, Pa. Tbe new company has opened offices in rooms 60, CI, (12 and 64 Times Building, New York. Aecldent at the Normal. David Ritcbey, an elderly man who resides on Bellefonte Avenue, was injured while at work at the Normal school building yesterday afternoon. He was working in the rear of the building when some one threw a pieoe of lumber out of a third story window. Mr. Ritohey was struck on the shoulder and severely, though not seriously injured. Glen Cnioa Item. A correspondent of the Kenovo Nuns writing from Glen Union says the Glen Union Lumber Company have employed Mr. E. T. Gallagher of Look Haven, to do tbe fine work on their cable suspension bridge at this plaoe. As a stone mason, Mr. Gallagher is unexcellod and unexoell-ible. They expect to have tbe bridge oompleted before cold weather. A Colored Woman to Lecture. Mrs. Frances E. W. Harper, of Philadelphia, superintendent of work among colored people, is expected to leoture in the Court House, on the evening of September 4th. Everybody please bear in mind the date and go to bear the lecture. Mrs. Harper is a colored lady, and an eloquent and able speaker. Entered a Convent. MiSBee ' Mary Desmond and Frances limner, of Renovo, nave entered the convent of the Sisters of Merey at Harrisburg. The Renovo Nevei speaks of tbe young ladies as being intelligent and well fitted for the life upon which they have entered. Both are accomplished musicians. Broke BU Leg, Josoph Lynob, of Renovo, was playing ball with tbe Wateontown club at Renovo yesterday, and while tbe game was progressing had bis left leg broken below tbo knee. Dr. Weymouth gave the iDjured man surgical attendance. Burning a Straw stack. A bright illumination was seen east of this city last night whioh It was thought was caused by burning buildings. It is learned to-day that the light was caused by tbo burning of a straw stack in Pine Creek township. Annual Meeting. The members of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, of Lock Haven, are notified that the annual meeting will be held on the afternoon of September 4tb, In their room over Hilton's drug store. Burled To-Dny. The lvamains of Mrs. Thomas Crawford arrived, in tins city from McKeesport last night. The funeral took place this aftor-noou. Unlldlnf a Ball. The Good Templars of Westport, this oounty, are building a large public ball, which in addition to being a plaoe for their meetings, will be used for lectures, eon-certs and other publie entertainments. Jewish Holidays. On Monday, September 15th, the Jewish Now Year occurs, which properly begins at sundown Sunday eve, September 14tb. The Day of Atonement this year falls ou the 23d of Septombor. New York World, June 10th. Tho costumes intended for tho "Uino-hart SiBters" were seized by Chief of Troasury Agents Wilbur this morniug aud are piled up in the 'Beisuro room of the Custom House. Capt. Alfred Sampson, who designed them, called at tbe CnBtom House this afternoon and beld a. confer- I ence with Collector Erhardt and Chief J Wilbur. Tho costumes aro valued al $5000, and the averago du'.y ou them would be nearly 50 per cent. It is probable, however, that they will be allowed to pass free of duty. They should have been entered as "tools of trade," and it was through a blunder on the other sido that they were not. Later-Tbo costumes belonging to the "Rinehart Sisters," that were seized by the Custom House officers, were released duty free and entered as "tools of trade." DELAMATER ANSWERS EMERY An Unequivocal Denial of the Charges Preferred Against our Standard Bearer. THE BASE ALLEGATION SILENCED JOHNSTOWN AND INSANITY. Mental Sffect of the Great Flood on Thoie Who FaiMd Thro neb It. Tbe seventh mnim al report of tbe State Committee on Lunacy, just issued, is of especial interest. A abort paper on tbe "Mental State of Some of tbe Survivors of tbe Johnstown Disaster" deserves to be cited in fall: "Doubtless there occurred in many instances, among those who perished, f brief period ol frenzy sumo lent in intensity to have permently overthrown their reason had life been spared to them, and there existed proof that, in not a few stances, suicide had been invoked as means of escape from an overwhelming sense of peril, but far outnumbering these were true heroism, fortitude and reliance apon Devine assistance and protection, as was evinced in the efforts of parents to save their children, husbands thoir wives aed sons, their aged parents, which are much lass painful to contemplate. To a majority of the victims death was prob ably almost instantaneous, but there were also those who apparently were hopelessly imprisoned and out off from human aid to whom a fearful doom slowly approached by rising water and approaching flames; but of even these, the survivors miraculously spared, nono are known to havo become insane from their contemplation of approaohing death. 'An extensive correspondence by tbe writer with all the hospitals, almshouses and other sources, public and private, of information upon the mental state of tbe survivors, reveals tbe present existence of about fifteen oasea of insanity in any man ner referable to tbe effects of the great cataitrophe. of whom seven were men, eight women, three males and four females, bad been insane prior to the flood, had been restored and are residing at Johnstown, of whom three males and three females bad each had ono previous attack; one female three previous attacks. 'None of these cases have been in imminent personal peril exoept one, a woman seventy-nine years of age, who had floated to a place of safety upon a bedstead. Of these oases, seven have since recovered under hospital treatment. Of these attacked, acute mania developed in live males, four females; acuto melanoholia in one male, one female; acute melancholia suicidal in one male, one female; subaoute melancholia in one female aud senile dementia in one female. *Iu reviewing this very small total, the oonviotion is strengthened that the great and overwhelming trials of life are much less liable to overthrow the reason than tbe continuous worry and attrition of minor evils and unavoidable contact with depressing surroundings." A Flrit Ward Fire. The residenoe of John McGHl, ou Railroad street, below Hanna, was destroyed by fire last night about midnight. The origin of the fire is unknown. Mr. MoGill was on police duty as a substitute for Officer Kane, and the supposition is that a coal oil lamp exploded and fired tho building, which was all aflame before Mrs. MoOiU was awakened. Two thousand feet of hose were required to obtain wator-from tbe plug at the corner of Hanna and Bald Eagle streets. A good strong stream of water was poured on tbe burning bouse but the flames bad gained such headway that nothing could be done to stay tbe work of destruction, which was soon complete. Only a portion of the household goods were saved. The Jobs is paitly oov-ered by an insurance of $1600, placed with the agency of C. M. O'Connor. The building was a case brick structure with elate roof, and was built a year or two ago. Tbe firemen were prompt in responding to the sound of the alarm bell. Austin Scourge*. By Fire. The town of Austin in Potter county, was nearly destroyed by fire Wednesday night. The population of Austin In 1680 was 1,600. The fire burned forty-two business houses and a number of dwelling houses. The fire started on Main street late Wendesday night and burned fiercely until yesterday morning at 4 o'clock. The loss is estimated at $500,000. PostuiaBter-Gonoral Wauamakct's life and accident insurance now amounts to $1,300,000, the largest iosurauco earned by any individual in tbe world. At a Meeting in ChamburnburK Last .Nighi tho Republican Candidate Makes an Emphatic Denial-Ills Statements Greet ed by the Plaudit* of the Crowd-Other Hate Newi. Chambeksbuiig, Aug. 1-1.-Senator Del amater spent to-day in Chambersburg as the guest of Judge John Stewart. Tonight a publio reception was tendered him in the Court House. An immense audi euce gave him an enthusiastic reception, As he closed his brief remarks one of the audience arose and said: "How about Sen ator Emery's charges ?" Again stepping to the platform Senator Delamatersaid: "On April 4th last.during my candidacy for the nomination, ex-Seua tor Louis Emery, Jr., made certain charges affecting my honor as a citizen and Sena tor. Until now I have refrained from making a public reply. Prior to my nora ination I claimed the right to make my own contest ia my own way, and was content to rely for my vindication upon my life-long character and reputation, built up in a very active professional and business career in Northwestern Pennsylvania. Tbe enthusiastic and unanimous endorsement of my own couuty, the cordial support of a majority of the delegates elected from the country districts, the exceptionally strong endorsement by citizens and business men of Philadelphia, and finally my nomination by the Harrisburg convention, all in the face of these undenied charges had seemed to me a sufficient answer. "The question now addressed to me implies that continued silence on my patt may bo misinterpreted by certain good citizens, whose affiliations are with the Republican party. As the candidate of that party I cannot allow its interests to be prejudiced in the estimation of any citizen by a refusal to answer any inquiry touching my personal and official integrity and I take this occasion to enter my most positive, emphatic and unequivocal denial of oach and every charge preferred by Senator Emery, so that I may be fully understood and that the real questions of the hour may not be obscured by personalities growing out of these attacks, and further reference to this subject may bo avoided. I enter this denial to all charges by whomsoever prefer rod, which assail my honor as a man and and my integrity as a citizen." His remarks were followed with loud applause. Mr. Dolamator will remain in town to-night and return to Philadelphia to-morrow. I BASE   BALI.  RKCORD. The Three Organizations aud Their Standing to Date. national  league. Bohton-Boston 2, Brooklyn 1. Cleveland- Clevoland 11, Pittsburg 6. Cincinnati-Cincinnati 2, Chicago 1. New Yoik-New York S, Philadelphia 1'layehs* league. Bo&ton-Philadelphia 19, Boston 2. New York-New York 5, Brooklyn 4. Chicago-Chicago 10, Pittsburg 7. Cleveland-Cleveland 9, Buffalo 8. american association. Toledo-Toledo 5, Brooklyn 2. Louisville-Louisvillo 17, Rochester 5. St. Louis-St Louis 0, Athletic 5. Standing of the Clubs, NATIONAL LEAGUE. Won. Lost. Brook I y n.........(11   32   Chi cago...... Boston.............bQ   155   New York.. Phlladelpbla.,53 ;M> Cleveland.. Cincinnati.......57   :tti   Pittsburg... FLAYERS' LEAGUE. Won. Lost. ......1!)   45 ......41    5!i ......29    61 .____!9    78 tho thieves who were supposed to be in this city, but their search was fruitless. Early this morning Constablo Myers, assisted by his son "Sam" arrested two boys named Charles Shaffer and William Barton on suspicion of having stolen to articles. The lads were about to jump a freight train at Clinton Avenue when the arrest was made. They were lodged in jail and will be given a hearing before Alderman Harris, who issued the warrant for thoir arrest. GEEAT FOREST FIRES. BoHlon........ Brooklyn... Ohlcnico...... Now Vork.. Won. Jxwt.. ......54    37 ...m ..51 Won. Lost. Phlladolpuia...51 Pittsburg.........10 O'levolaud........10 Uulliilo.......:.....'i5 il 50 american association. Won. Lost. Lonlsvlllo........5S   31 8t. Louis..........S3   m Athletic...........4S   12 Rochester........Vt   13 Won. Coinmbus.........m Toledo............ Syracuse..........35 Brooklyn.......-211 Lost. 53 Thimeumlft of Quarts of Ice Crenm. Tea thousand quarts of ice cream wore sold by an establishment doing business ou Park Row, Now Pork, on a rooent warm day. The World says: "The company, which owns many other shops iu Now York as well as the oue in question, sold ou the day referred to a grand total of -10,000 quarts." A Dlnigtroug Blaza Now Kaffinjc in Dakota Wood.. Rapid City, S. D., Aug. 14-In tho Southern Hillg, within sight of this) city, dark volumes of smoke are rising from a> region understood to be twenty mileB in extdbt. The wind at one time cleared tba atmosphere between that point and this city, which enabled a good view to bo ob. tained. There are two fires between this oityand Rock ford. The first Is four miles east of Rookford, in dead timber.' It originated from lightniDg which struok ten or more days ago. The fire is spreading all the time in evory direction, and consumes everything in its way. Tho fire has already destroyed a great deal of good timber. List. week, some person in passing along the road near Lockwood's Ttanoh throw tho contents of a pipe on fbe dry grass, closo to Lock-wood's houso. It soon caught, and a dangerous prairie fire resulted. Hundreds of acros of pastuae land was burned' orer. It was several miles in extent, but the 1 oss was confined to the grasB. PUNGENT POT POITKRI. A Miscellaneous Mixture of Sense and Kon-sense Scissored and Scribbled. His form was trembling like a leaf; It seemed beyond bis will' To kcet> bis tongue from stuttering- To. make hlB hand keep still. "Have you tbe ague some one asked?" But his.bead seemed in a whirl As, taking another beer, he said; "No; I'vetbeen shook by my girt There are two sides to every question- the wrong side and our side. The illegal voter ought to be called History,'* beeause he repeats himself. The man who can afford to pay for ice now is tbe ono that "tikes the tcake." Truth lies at the bottom of an ink well. This explains why tbo postscripts oontain all the f&ots. Oddly enough we call them' grandstands, when they are built expressly for us to sit down upon. Under the present statutes of Missouri a person can marry, be divorced and remarry in thirty one days. The girl in Kent who o>te up all her father's peach crop was no glutton. The crop consisted of one poach. It is a little singular to say the least that after a man has been painting tbe town red he usually feel bine. Tho man who says he- is going to get there, and don't you forget it, makes more noise about it than the man who iB actually there. Pretty near" doesn't count. The tun-beam that travels 95,000,000 miles may be stopped seven feet from the eatth by a cheap umbrella. A public man who is bold enough to tell the truth on all occasions should be preserved in alcohol by his enemies after his friends have demolished him: Boys Under ArretM. Yesterday a number of friends of W. II. Sanderson were pieuicing on Sanderson's ! Island and during tho temporary absence i of tho picuiccis from tho tablts where tbo Sailors have some sixty ways of tying a I refreshments wore served, a lot of silver knot, and fet a olergynian can tie the ono knives, forks, spoons, and Bilvor drinking that for holding tight beats tho others all cup were stolen.   Constables Myers, Kol-hollow. | ler and Martin Bpont last night looking for Great Low Kate Exearsion. Tne Pennsylvania Railroad will ran a speoial exoarsion from Look Haven on Monday,tho 18ih inst., leaving at 5:30 a. m. for Atlantio City, Cape May, Long Branch and Ocean Grove via the. - picturesque Schuykill Valley route. The tioketswill be valid for return trip by any regular train until and iooluding August 23th. The round trip to Atlantio City and Cape May only $175. and to Long Branch or Ocean Grove Jo.25. The train will arrive at Philadelphia at 12:55 p. m., whiob will give passengers an opportunity to take dinner there and proceed to tbe seashore on the afternoon trains. Tickets are good to return via narrigbnrg if patrons desire to come this route. Must Nut Smoke. The New York Board of Aldermen has adopted a resolution that the law regarding tho smoking of cigarettes on tbo streets and in public places by boys under sixteen. years of nge shall be rigidly enforced. The punishment is a fine of ten dollars. The Bis; Picnic To-morrow. Tho picnio of tho railroad shopmeu at Nippeno to-mo-row, promises to be the biggest thing of tho kind over held on tho grounds. Iu addition to the 2,500 people from Renovo, there will bo over 2,000 per-sous from Suubury. Ilorae Stolen. A young mare owned by J. M. liricker was stolen last night from tbe (arm of J. B. Puist, near Salona. Tbe animal was taken out of the stable during the night. The police of this city were notified, this < morning.   

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Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

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