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Lock Haven Express: Friday, August 8, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - August 8, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAH-NO- 130. LOCK HAVEN, FA.. Fill DAY. AUGUST S, 1S90. PBICE-TWO CENTS EVJ^ING^EXPBESS ioxSW>K~uT:OTIIi:KS---PUBLISHES CURRENT COMMENT. Han�:..ng is 100 good for some men, but electrocute isn't. Fun two people who are supposed to ho moral.3* antngouintio, President Harrison nuil Mr. I'laino soora to bo having an uncommonly pleasant time togethor. The LoKii'in limes has at length com-ply tod the payments on its expenso account for the ram'ell Commission, tha total bc FOR TliK SKA SIIOltK.    ( Xhe Three Organization* and Their Standing to Date. national   league. Brooklyn-Brooklyn 14, Boston 5. Cincinnati-Cincinnati 2-i, Pittsburg 17. Cleveland-Cleveland 1(1, Cbioago 4. Philttdelpbia-Philadelphia 5,New York I'LA YEllrf'   I-EAtJVK. Chicago-Chicago 18, Cleveland I lioston-Boston 4, Now York 2. Pittsburg-Buffalo 10, Fittaburg 3. Urooklyn-Brooklyn 5, Philadelphia  4. american association. St. Louis-St. Louis 8, Syracuse o. Toledo-Toledo 11, Rochester 0. Louisville-Louisville 7, Brooklyn 2. .Standing of tho Clubr). NATIONAL LEAGUE. Won. Lost* Brooklyn.........lilt   ��> Phlladelpula...Fj7   :t> Boston.... Cincinnati.. Chicago....... New York... Cleveland.. Pittsburg.... Won. ......li Lost. PLAYERS' league. Plilliulelpuli PlLtaburg .... Cleveland.... mimilu....... ..il Won. Lost. Boston..............ftf    �� Brooklyn.........Wt   10 New York........47    10 Chicago...........�    U> AMERICA'S ASSOCIATION. Won. Lout.: Won. Louisville-.......:tu  iColumbuH.........i-f St. Louis..........fid   :il   Toledo..............3S Athletic...........47   :*i -Syracuse..........ss Uocii enter........Ij   3D   'BrooKlyn.........25 68 When Whlfikey Wan Cheap. A gentleman who in looking over some old papers found an old bill rendered many \oars i^o, by a thim merchant of thiaci'y, l.nnd-d a copy nf tbt items to tho Estuksh. They rc;ni f'VthtWr: 1>)4*. The Low Rate Excursion to tho Popular Seaside KeaortH. From present-indications the, Monday, August ltith, four to Atlantic City, Cape May, Long Branch, or Ooean Grove, bids fair to be a "red letter day" for the excursionists. Tho fast express time and excellent train equipments of this company is alone a pronounced attraction, while the exceptionally low rates come within tho roach of all. Speoial train will leave at 5:30 a. m. and excursion liokots will bo sold to Atlantic City or Capo May from Lock Haven at a rate of $4.75 Tickets will also be sold to Sea Isle City, Ocean City, Avalou, Anglesea, Wildwood, or Holly Beach at tho same rates as quoted to Atlantic City, or Cape May. * Excursion tiokets to Long Branch or Ocean Grove will be sold at a rato of 50 cent additional to above rate. These tickets will be good to return until Aug-uBt 28, inolusive, on all regular trains except limited express train, and admit of stopping over in Philadelphia within limit. The fact of tho Camp Meeting ceremonies being at their height in Ocean Grove will prove an attractive feature, while such a rare opportunity for visiting all these much-talked-of resorts may not present itsolf soon again, and this is tbo chance to embrace one of tho Pennsylvania Railroad's spocial train trips. What Crushed Stone CoBt. At a regular meeting of the borough council of Jersey Shore the membors of the supply committee who recently visited this city made a detailed report of what, they learned while here. The report of tho committee was as follows: That ou July 19, they visited Look Haven, wore shown over the city by tho Mayor, and found everything at quarry aud crusher working in first class order, aud that the cost was about 30c yer yard, to quarry, and put tho stone on the oars, cost of crushing about 10c. Amount crushed per hour, about ten cubic yards. The delivery on streets, GO and 70o per cubic yard. Making tho total cost of tho atono on the road about $1.40 per cubic yard. SOMETHING ABOUT SUNBUHY Seventh Way AdventUts at Flewiiifjtou, The tabernacle services of the Seventh Day Advontists that aronow being held at Flemiugtou have been largely attended from the first, and if their attoudauce continues to increase It will be uecessary to enlarge thoir tabernacle. Tho elders are made exceedingly busy as the result of tho large interest at Flomington besides having tho burden of looking after the good work that was begun iu Lock Haven. The demands for help are so great that it necessitates an increase of laborers. May tbo noblo work goon. Sunday they will give their reasons for their belief that Christ's coming is near. it. e. t. Proposed Street Railway. There Is a movomcnt being made in this city, it is said, towards organizing a com-pany for the purpose of building and equipping a street railway, tho proposed lino to extoud from the depot of the Booch Creek railroad to tho Normal School. Tho persons whom it is said will compose tho company are mostly young business men of tho city, who are satisfied that tho investment of the small amount of capita^ required to construct aud equip tho line could nut bo more profitably invested. Colored Miiwons Festival. The cake walk at tho Armory lafct. night for the benefit of the colored Masons waa a grand success and considerable money was roali/.od for the bonefit of tho order. The largest cako was awardod to Miss Julia Smith, whom tho judges agreed was tho most graceful walker among those competing for tho print. The gold watch contested tor by William Hamiliju and Thomas Culby was won by tho latter. Thoro wero a number of colored folks present from Jersey Shore and Williameport. Proof That There is Much to Sec Study in This Anciont Borough, aud A FAMOUS COLLECTION OF EELI0S Sl.'iO iU 20 Camplnc Out. E. A. Fanohcr's show company are camping out at Sugar Run. Tho tent was erected yesterday, and tho oompany will romain in camp about two weeks. Give Our Hide a Chance. Iu our article yesterday taken from the New York Herald, entitled "Business Men iu Theatricals," we notico tho "RinO' hart Sistors" are going to make a few stops before -making a run in 4,San Fran oisco." Now why can't wo have this company stay one night or more with us'* They suroly must have a first-class oom-pauy to contemplato so loug a season iu tho weutcm metropolis. Such a company w.juld bo a rcliuf from tho No. 2, :J and ^jinuiimcH 4 companies Now Yorlt genu-j;iiy Hem;^ uh.   Givo uh a cluiuoo. Skillful Surnor.V. ,::>.;..'. vctcranary surgoo:), pur- :,'i:.i-..d ,i :.!;i!!fiil np^-atien ycfi'ardoy in : � � :t a'DFOtvis   from      !.:ov�o '.��.vied by blackjiiiith J'j!;h Kiun.   The ;(i ;;!;�.!      eporatiou quick- ly pcrfoi meil. A lilfi Pile or MtloiiH. Messrs. Fredericks cc Jofferis received 1010 water melons and 200 cautolourpos, yesterday afternoon. The Splendid Boating: Coarse of the loin Clab-SometblDK About a Popular Ex-Shetin and a Faithful Ex-Editor-A Word About tho Present and Kx-Poetmaater and Everybody's Friend Will Dowart. [Special Correspondence.] Suxbcry, Aug. 7."-There is much to see and study in this ancient borough, and the visitor if hs is of an inquiring turn of mind, cannot fail to be edified and delighted. It is the oldest town in this part of tho State, so far as white settlements are concerned, the Moravians having a mission hero as early as 1747, Tbey soon afterwards established a smith shop, which was aarricd on for several years and was greatly appreciated by tho Indians, because they could get their firearms repaired when out of order. Shamo-kin was also the seat of an Indian vice-King named Shlk*elli-my, who was stationed here by tho Six Nations to go vara the Indians; and if the accounts left by the Moravian missionaries are to be credited, he was in every respeot a "good Indian," and saved the scalp of many a white man. Tho old king died December 17, 174S, aud he received a Christian burial at the bands of the Moravians. Bishop Zeisborgor, was present when he died, and left an ac~ count of his death, which is on file amoug tho Moravian archives at Bethlehem. A wooden coffin was made for him and be waa laid away in the Indian burial ground near where Fort Augusta was afterwards built. Tho old chief is . supposed to have been the first Indian who was honored with a coffin at this place on his departure for "the happy hunting groundd." Speaking of this remarkable aborigine reminds mo that Shamokin wjis a famous place for- collectors of Indian antiquities, and many raro specimens have been gathered here. M. L. Hendricks is the possessor of a very fine collection made by himself. In 1853 his father owned the farm on whioh tho cemetery was located and as young Hendricks had a taste for acquiring Indian relics, he opened many graves aud was richly rewarded for his labor. In one grave whioh contained the crumbling remains of a oofiin, bo found about 400 beads of glass, bone and amber, besides many other trinkets, including a copper modal adorned with a portrait of George tho Third, a rusted musket barrel, knifo and tomahawk. As no other graves contained such a large and valuable collection of trinkets, Mr. Hendricks entertains the opinion that Shik-elli-my was laid there, and as he has a piece of tho coffin, there seems to be no doubt but what he is right in his ^conclusions. All theso valuable antiqultios are kept in a neat wooden oase, with a glass top, which waa manufactured out of pine timbor found among the crumbling ruins of Fort Augusta many years ago. lie takes pride in exhibiting it to visitors and antiquarians are always dolighted in examining it. Tho hills which surround Suubury aro bold and picturesque; and with tho wide river in front of the town, the scenery is charming in tho extroaio. There is no finer boating placo in the country than on tho pool of the dam, and tho lola Club is ono of tho institutions of the towu. Tbey own an ample outfit of shells, and tho sport is exhilarating as well as exciting Tho dam is spanned by a gracoful aud oostly iron bridge erected by the Reading Railroad Company, and a public bridge by private enterprise Ik talked of lor the c: n venienco of Suydor couniy reside^;*. Such a htruciuro, it is believed would nr-d groatly to the trade of tho town, and it will probably be built before many years. Tho buzz of tbo politician is already hoard on the streots of the town, and as a numbor of couuty officers aro to bo elected this fall, it is believed that tho campaign will bo a sharp and exciting one. A Sheriff is to bo elected, and Jacob Kromcr, of Watsontown, will bo one of tho Ropublicau candidates. Ho served one term three years ago and mado such a popular officer that on retiring ho was promptly nominated for Treasuior and elected, lie is jtifcf now closing his term, but lib: irieuda throughout the county itisitt thM be shall go ha ok into tho Sheriff's nfibjf\ uud as his strength in great there is a p.Hi- wu heard by many, aoveral cattle minium looso in the woods have been killed aud partly devoured. If this report is true a riug hunt should bo organized and tho brute hunted down. The rcoun-; ain range ontends southward for hundreds of miles and the panther evidently oomes north on a summer vaoation. This country has been remarkably clear of such visitations, but the report goes to show that tho paDther race is not extinct. He IntiignHiitiy Denlee the Allegation Tbat He Gave Orders to Have the Current Stopped-He �ajs He Was 1'rewnt to Make a Scientific Examination of the Brain. New York, Aug. 7.-Dr. Spitzka, who was present at the exeoution of William Kemmler at Auburn prison yesterday makes the following statement: "The aspersion attributed to a phyai-oian from Buffalo tbat the undersigned ordered the currentB Btopped or in any way directed the steps rendered necessary at the Kemmler exeontion is utterly unfounded. No one in the execution chamber knew or could know anything about the voltage, nor did any one order the oar-rent tamed off. It was turned off in accordance with a previous understanding. Dr. Carlos MacDonald and myself (between whom and myself complete harmony existed), on being asked by the warden what time should be taken, agreed to fifteen seconds and actually seventeen were allowed to elapse. When Kemmler's death appeared doubtful, I suggested in a hurried way, to the warden to have it instantly turned on again, and it waa the warden who gave the order then and there. I went to Auburn solely to make an examination of the brain, and not as an assistant executioner. The dynamo, as judged by the action of Kommler'a body, acted very irregularly. The source of this it will be interesting to ascertain, as well as the animuB whioh dictated the gratuitous and untrue statement of the person alluded to, if really made by him. As an avowed opponent, and as one known to be such of the electrical method, 1 went to Anburn. Under these circumstances it wero scarcely consistent for me to volunteer as performer of that method. Had either my associate, Dr. Carlos MacDonald, or myself been able to anticipate Buob misstatements bmug made, we oertainly should have declined to aet in the medical capacity whioh we alone held. My sole suggestion was ooncided with by all' present. The turning on of the seoond current was diotated by humanity, in view of the doubt as to the oomplete destruction of life. Respectfully, E. C. Spitzka." PUNGENT POT POUKRI. A MlsceUaneatu HJlxtere of Seaaa and Mon-enie Scissored and Scribbled. A skunk will smell as bad whether yon call it a skunk or Mephntis Ameri-oanus. Man is the only animal tbat smiles. Yes but be is the only one tbat weeps, too! Of all who eat green com from the cob, flute players are the most aeoom- plished. Have jou ever noticed in playing cards that a good deal depends on a good deal? Too many men confine their obarity to giving their neighbors stale cigar smoke. Yes, it is hot, very hot, bat the way to keep out of hot plages is by going to ohuroh. Peaches and pears will probably take the   plaoe  of  jewels  as engagement presents. It is said that there are SOD ways to cook a frog, bat two or three ways are enough. The old-fashioned housewife is expressing her blackberry wine for next winter's ersmps. The discoverers of perpetual motion are not so numerous as the perpetstal dis oorery of fools. At Centre's Capital. These personals are from the Bellefonte Keyttone Qcuette: Miss Jennie Jacobs, formerly one of Centre's bright school teachers, who at one time resided at Roland and now lives in Lock Haven, was in Bellefonte on Thursday. Miss Lilla Harvey, of Look Haven, who was one of the most attractive young ladies at the hop at ex-Judge Orris' residence Monday evening, departed again for her home in the Lumber City on Tuesday a. m. Miss Bessie Ball, one of Look Haven's fashionable young ladies, is the guest of Miss Grace Houok. Comments of the British Preee, London, Aug. 7. - The Chronicle, commenting upon the killing of Kemmler by electricity, says the scene was worthy of the darkest chambers of the inquisition in the sixteenth oentury. The 1 imes says it would be impossible to imagine a more revolting exhibition. It ad-vocatos a lethal chamber in preference to electricity. The Standard says: "The scene can be described as a disgrace to humanity. Itt] will send a thrill of indignation through, out the civilized world. We cannot believe that Americans will allow the electrical execution act to Btand. Tho Lumber Trade Depression. Ottawa, Aug. 7.-Leading Canadian and American lumbermen are here dis-oussiug the depression in the lumber trade. Among them are W. O. Emery, Bay City; G. N. White, of White & Avery, of Albany, N. Y., and Ottis bhephord, of Shepherd & Morse, of Boston. Two Men Fatally Hurt. Prm.ADEi.riifA, | Aug. 7.-A construe tion train was derailed near Media this evening, and Edward Carter and Cornelius O'Keofe, were fatally injured Carter died in the hospital. The Oeortrla Democratic Ticket. Atlanta, Aue. 7.-The Democratio Stat Convention to-day nominated a full tioktt, beadoil by W. J. Nortben, for Governor. Window Broken. Some time last night a piece of slab wood was thrown through the window at Marshall's bakery on Water street by some person unknown. The glass was shattered and tho window sash broken, Wiiyne Tun-iiMhlp Tohncco. A correspondent of the Jersey Shoro Vhli'ttc, writing from Wayuo township, says the uumbor of aorea of Wayne township tobacco for 1800; is as follows: Ma.}. G. W. Sours, 4 aorcs; Jjtoob Stamrn, �1; Ttios. Quisle, 0; Edwin Winchester, I'.; Michael Shnrr, 4; Kobt. Johnsou,     J. I mill It. C.  ; Oioo. Betts, Sj; : v-ha;.'. Uiilhi.^yr S, rttitl  ,'r.thu Sitoeox 0. | 'lotM number of acre� iu '.he lowoahip-71. i   Thti tobacco in this district never looked J uH!or an ft jr. ton day* earlier llmu usual. , Quito ft lot ot the weed will bo in the shod ' before tho 15th of this ituutb. At Pine Camp Ground. There are now twelve families encamped at Tine Camp grounds and a number of others will occupy tents next week. The camp ruoeting proper will commence on Thursday, August 21st. Removing* the Ocmss. Canal Foreman Theodore Myers and a crew of men are at work to-day removing the grass which was floated out ot the canal into the pool of the dam a few days ago. The grass is lifted from tie water by the men who use hooks such as an used for digging potatoes. Tbo gnus is plsced upon the canal company's fist and is to ba taken below the dam. Opening of the Opera Haaae. Charles Frohman's "Midnight Call" company have secured the Opera House for Saturday evening, August 23d. This will be the opening attraction of a Mason tbat promises to be the best and most profitable within tha history of the Opera House. "Patrioe" is the bright,partioolar star of the "Midnight Call" oompany. . A Fifty Dollar. Cluck. Messrs. Hopkins & Weymouth presented to the firemen ot Phillpsburg a check for (50 for services rendered at the late fire at Snow Shoe. The money was divided between the Hope and Reliance oompany as is learned from the Pbilips-burg Journal. An Ezcltrnc; Content. A special to the Philadelphia Timet of today, from Bellefonte, says: "A game of base ball was played here to-day between Look Haven and Bellefonte. It was very exciting throughout and resulted tn the score of 16 to IT in favor of Lock Haven." Emanuel Wilvort, with  tho Sunbury who was identified American  for over Uallroaders Picnic. The employes of the Beech Craok railroad from all along tho line will picnic ot Clearfield park on Monday, August 18th. Later Returns. Cai-taiu Bricker informed a representative of the Eni'hf.ss yestorday that by late returns, Clinton county's population hat* been iucroaaed cioro than one thousand over what was fir6t given. Detained by a Wreck. | 3Jay Esprcsa train arrivod iu this oity t over an hour li-to yetierilay tho detention | bnnvj uaupijd by r. freight wreck at Kane i Hill. There wt-re stveu ears wrecked but uo one was hurt. The Differences Compromised. Wasiiinston, Aug. 7.-The conference committee on the fortification appropriation bill compromised thoir differences today. �enUBcs To-Nla-ht, A regular meeting of Canton Look Haven, I. O. O. F., will be held this evening, at whioh business of special Importance to all the members will be transacted. The regular weekly meeting of theiA. O. U. W. will be held tonight st.8 o'olook. A full attendance is requested. The Ftremeai's Aisorlstlen. Printed circulars have been sent out by the Committee on State Firemen's Association requesting delegates to vote for Look Haven ss the plaoe of meeting nest year. A circular waa sent to every delegate in the State and also to most of the fire companies. ----------  -*-. Lost HI. Keys. Rev. R. W. Perkins has lost his banoh of keys. He thinks be left them upon the desk in the post office, and will be nnder obligations for their return either to bim or the post office. The loth Comes on Sunday. Pay your gas bill either to-dsy or tomorrow and secure the discount. The 10th comes on Sunday this month, whioh makes ail bills due on the 9th. PERSONAL   PEtfCIXlnas. Sheriff Leahy was among the veterans who left for Boston this morning. Mrs. John T. Butler, o! Williameport, is spending a few days in this oity as the guest of her friend, Mrs. Clark. Mr. John A. Srwin, of Tork, Pa., business manager of the Lutheran Mitttonflry Journal, is visiting in this city as the guest of Mr. Harry Walters.   

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