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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: July 29, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - July 29, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAR-NO. 127 LOCK HAVEN, PA.. TUESDAY. JULY 29, 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS BUNSLCB BROTHERS---POBLISHKRS CURRENT COMMENT. If England oouldn't whip the United ' States on aoconnt of tea in 1770, she will not attempt it on aooouut of sealskin in 1890.        _ Electricity cares as well as kills. Inanimate bodies have been galvanized into life as effectually as living beings have been struck dead. There is to bo a recount of the population of the cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Judging from the bad blood exhibited during the first taking of the census, it is probable the militia will have t3 bo oalled out before the new count is finished. Tiie Louisiana farmers are deolaring against the lottery Bwindlo, and will make a vigorous campaign to kill it. It is probable that the bill urged by Postmaster General Wanamaker to seize the lottery swindler's mail will do tbe work before the Louisiana farmers have the opportunity. _ The Governor of Mississippi has offered a reward of $5,000 for the arrest and con-viotion of the murderer of F. M. B. Cook, the murdered Republican leader. This evinces a determined purpose on the part of the Oevernor to hunt the murderer down, but we fear be will never be successful. The Mississippi politioal murderer, especially when he kills a Republican, is never arrested. Mrs. Grover Cleveland is the possessor of diamonds the total collection of whioh set and mounted, is estimated at fully $50,000. On the day of ber marriage she received a magnificent ring and aneoklaco solitaire from her husband, and diamond pins for-hor hair from Seoretary and Mrs. Whitney, but the first diamond ring she ever possessed was given to her by one of her Buffalo friends. It was a tiny little star of diamonds, and she wore it upon her little Snger tbe day she beoame Mrs. Cleveland. Sinoe this time, upon birthdays and at Christmas, Mr. Cleveland has always presented his wife with diamonds. Evert man who wants to go through life with tbe aonscionsneBS of an approving conscience should strive to walk consistently in the world. If he is a drinker it is better that he walk into the front door of the rumsbop tban to steal around the back way. If bo is a temmperance man he should be a total abstainer in fact as well as in theory. If he wants to have oredit for sincerity among bis neighbors, and especially among those who do not believe in total abstinence or in prohibition, he must have no bodily infirmaties wbicb necessitate the ubo of wine, beer, whisky or patent medicines, the base of which is mean whisky. In short his actions and his language must correspond. Otherwise he will be without influenoe and men will desplfe him as one who wears a mask before the public. A Story Without a Moral. Frum the St. Paul Globe. There was an occurrence not long ago in the city of Minneapolis which well^llus-trated the making of virtue a necessity andprofltingthereby. A lady, than whose name there is none better known in the theatrical world, waB playing an engagement at the Grand. She stopped of course at the West. One day she waB engaged in looking over her wardrobe, or a portion of it, in her room, and being busy bad her luncheon sent to ber room. When il came her stage diamonds, made of the purest paste, was scattered about on the table, among them being a large cross, heavily set with sparkling diamonds. It oangbt the eye of tbe waiter who brought up the tray, and by a little juggliug with bis napkin he secured it. He rushed down town as soon as possible to, in vulgar parlance, "hock" it, but found that heoould raise but 50 oentson it. He was a "smootby guy," so he hastened back to the hotel, only to find that the lady had departed for the matinee performance. To the theatre he went, and, securing admission at the Btage entrance on "pressing business from Miss-, -Hotol" he found the lady and restored to her the diamond cross, which he plausibly sot forth bad become entangled in a napkin. She had never even missed tbe ornament, but she waB so delighted with the fellow's honesty that Bhe bestowed on him a $5 bill. Thia is a true story, and one whioh will not be incorporated among those in the Sunday Bohool books under the title "The Reward of Honesty." To Protect the Pier. Ex-boom boss McGill aud several workmen are engaged in building a crib in the river a short distance above the river bridge. The crib when completed will be floated down to the pier of the bridge ?eareBt the Lockport shore, and then filled with stone to protect the pier. Adjourned Court. An adjourned session of court will bo bold Saturday, August 30th, at 9 o'clock , m. WHERE THE MILLIONS WENT Eeport of the Seoretary of the Flood Belief Commission. BEF0EE A �WATTING PUBLIC AT LAST It Shows Total ContrlbntloDft Amoanting to 84,116,801, or Which Sum �2,592,93� Went to Johnitown and 340,473 Found Its Way In this Direction-Secret Ordura Subscribed s2s9,540. The official report of the Johnstown Flood Relief Commies ion is at last before the public. It comes in a pamphlet of 110 pages, and covers the subject on every side, in a style that gives the first authoritative utterance on a matter upon which the people have long waited. Secretary J. B. Kremer completed the report at Carlisle, June 23d last. In it he shows that the Commission expended a total sum of $2,845,140.83. Of this aggregate the Conemaugh Valley received iJ2,592,93G.68, and places outside the Conemaugh $246,-475.26. The items were credited as annexed: IN THE CONEJIAUQII VALLEY. Expended for supplies........................j 61,533 86 Paid for labor-.....................................   43,931 U Paid for bulldlngB, rent and labor on buildings..................................... 179,033 87 Paid for burial of tbe dead and for the removal of the dead to "Grand View," including the purchase of the plot and the appropriationb made for the improving of the ground and for purchasing headstones.................................................    30,485 41 Paid for the transportation of flood sufferers.............................................   17,176 lfi Paid for freight, express charges and telegrams........................,................   10,128 14 Paid for printing and stationary......      6SM (Jl Paid expenses of officers at Johnstown.........,........................................    7,774 00 Paid attorney's fees..............................        9S 97 Paid expenses of the First National Bank, JohnBiown, connected with the distributions..............................      75u 42 Distributed special sums as designated by the donors........,.,.................     2,071 85 Distributed sums specially appropriated by the Commission............     2,675 00 Paid to committee the amount appropriated for a hospital...............    40,000 00 Paid to committee the amout ap-priated as an "Orphan Fund."......   119,616 86 Distribution cash. "First I'lstribu-tlon".................................................   416,472 00 Distribution cash, "Final Distribution "..................................................1,660,495,00 Total expenditures In the Conemaugh Valley..............................$2,592,036 63 OUTSIDE THE CONKMAtTGH VALLEY. Sent to Renovo district, cash-.......... $7,036 00 Sent to Lock Haven district, supplies 568 14 cash......... 47,195 00 Sent to Willlamsport, supplies......... 4,449 20 cash_______ 110,760 00 cash for hospital 5,000 00 Sent to Jemey Shore district, cash___ 35,524 06 Sent to Ml All n town district (Juniata counts), cash.................................... 3,000 00 Sent to Lewistown district (Mifflin county), cash.............................. 0,621 77 Sent to Newport district,  (Perry county), cash...................._.....,....... 7,010 00 Distributed In Onion county, cash... 865 00 Distributed In Dauphin county, cash 750 00 DlstrlbutedlnTlogacounty, supplies 42 50 cash......... 1,300 00 Distributed In Blair county, cash..... 190 00 Distributed In Bedford county, supplies................................................ 6 84 cash...... 3,420 � Distributed in Huntingdon county, cash................................................. 4,220 50 Distributed in Westmoreland county, cash.............................................. 2,966 25 Distributed    In    Northumberland county, cash..................................... 2,180 00 Distributed In Fulton county, cash... 245 00 Distributed InCleartleldcounty.cash 75 00 Distributed In Centre county, cash... 5000 Total   expenditures  outside the Conemaugh Valley......................5246,475 28 the funds complete. The mortuary statement of the flood at Johnstown credits the number of lost at 2,142, found and identified 1,115, found and not identified 636, and missing 391. A lengthy narrative is devoted to the work done at JonnBtown, with the details of which the publio is familiar. The total cash contributions devoted to the flood aggregate as follows: To the four principal fund?............ 83,307,860 50 To local committees direct...........    435,021 28 Through charitable and social organizations..........................._______     25!Vao 82 Through aid societies.......................      41,932 50 To Welsh citizens.............................       1,400 00 Thiough the Mayor of St. Louis.....       5,200 00 Through theNew York World.........     16,939 20 Through the New York Mail and J?ri)rcss............................................       49,080 OS Total............................................. 54,116,801 48 moseys fjiom toe commission*. The Commission's account with this and other districts is as follows: DISTRICTS. Renovo................... Locfe Haven.......... Jersey Shore.......... Willlamsport;........ Mlllllntown............ Lewistown............ Newport................. Union..................... Dauphin................. Tioga....................... Blair....................... Bedford.................. Hunrlugdon ........ Northumberrud ... Westmoreland...... Clearfield............... Fulton ,.................. Centra.................... FROM THE COMMISSION. Suppl's     Caih. 568 14 TTao'S): me oo 195 oo 524 Ofi 760 00 000 00 621 01 e oo 865 00 750 00 300 001 190 00 420 01' 220 51) 180 (Jl 900 25 75 (X 215 tf 50 0! Total....................|$5 m 6818211 408 68|389220 From other sources Cash. S3 059 00 24 979 17 7 277 53 45 151 82 500 00 8 058 63 191 02 GIVEN BY SECRET ORDEItS. The various secret societies or orders gave a total of $259,540.82, all of whioh, with the exception of 410.3G6.76 went to Johnstown.   We append tbe credits: Independent Order of Odd Fellows.....Sfi'J.OIfi 69 The Masonic Orders............................  49,712 15 The KuighUt of PIUilas.............._........  32,531 99 The Koyal Arcanum............................  27.1137 41 Grand Army of the Republic...........  22.229 02 Junior Order ofthe United American aiechanlcs.........................................   13.S92 30 Knights of the Golden Eagle..............  10.213 65 Knights or Honor.................................    9.309 70 Knights of the Mystic Chain..............    6,151 30 Senior Order of the United American Mechanics..........................................    5,913 07 Improved Order of Ked Men...............    5,783 26 PatriotlcSons of America..................   3,718 98 Improved Ordtr of Heptasopli*<..........   3,266 80 Womau's Belief Corps, Grand Aimy or the Republic 191,010.00   to Ked Cross Id addition)..............................    1,948 55 Woman's Johnstown Belief Corps, of Pittsburg........................................    1,735.60 Military Order of Loyal Legion..........    1,200 00 Ladies ol the Graud Army of ibu Republic.............................................      677 IB Rons of Veterans...................................     790 80 Union Veteran Legion.........................     624 55 Total.................. .......J259,5i0 82 In the death record Lycoming county is credited with 25,, Clinton 30, Centre 4, Clearfield 2, Cameron 1, Dauphin 3, Huntingdon 2, Indiana 1 and Tioga 10. Total 78. The report haB this to say respecting the four districts in this section of the State: jersey shore district. The Jersey Shore committee consisted of Messrs. E. D. Trump, P. D. Bricker, H. B. Humes, J. S. Tomb, L. Koester and C. B. Seely, who had the care of th�t town and the townships in their end of Lycoming county. In this dtstriot muoh damage was oaused along some of the smaller streams as well as in the town of Jersey Shore. To this die trie t was sent $12,801.59, of which the commission sent $35,524.06, and $7,277.53 was received from 'other sources, $1,105 being subscribed by citizens of Jersey Shore. There were C35 recipients of sums ranging from $5.00 to $750. williamsport district. This distriot, comprising all of Lycoming county, except tbe Jersey Shore district, had for a committae, Hon. James S. Fores man, Kev. Eugene A. Garvey, Rev. William H. Graff, Kev. Edward J. Gray, and Messrs. H. R. Fleming, Eliaa Deem-er, Fletcher Coleman, William Eves and Franklin Reading. Having a very large territory to care for, and one having Buffered most severely, the work of this committee was of a laborious character. On four of the members the active labor devolved, who, laying aside their own occupations, gave their entire time for several months to the work, the other members meeting and advising with them. Under their direction was oarried on the work of oleaning streets and cellars, under authority of tbe State Board of Health, and repairing and rebuilding the dwellings of those not able to care for their own property. They distributed enormous amounts of supplies sent to them, and examined and passed upon, after having made personal investigation, 2,833 claims. Tbe amount expended in the distrlots for relief was $155,911.82, of whioh the Commission sent cash $110,560.00, and also purchased supplies to the amount of $4,449.20. In addition, tho Commission appropriated $5,000.00 to the hospital in Willlamsport, for the benefit of the District, a measure which seemed necessary by reason of increased domands on that institution resulting from the floods. There was re-ceived in this district from outside sources, $24,492.25, and $20,659.00 were given by the citizens of WilliamBport. Payments were made to 2,352 persons in sums ranging from $5.00 to $592.00, and annuities to amount of $1,650.00. tioga coujtty. In Tioga county hut little money was paid, to individuals, the principal help given being in clearing and rendering habitable the properties of those requiring assistance. The amount expended by the Commission in the county wbb $1,300.00, under tbe personal supervision of Hon. H. W. Williams. The State Board of health also expended a fair amount of money for general sanitary purposes. renovo. A committee consisting of Mr. Thomas A. Roberts, Rev. J. D. Cook, Rev. J. J. Connelly, and Messrs. John Smith, Lewis Putt, George R. McCrea and E. T. Swain, distributed the funds sent to that place. The amount of cash distributed in Renovo was $10,095.00, of which $7,050.00 was sent by the Commission, and the recipients numbered 191, who received sums ranging from $5.00 to $352.00. lock haven   district. The Lock Haven district, inoluding all of Clinton county except Renovo, was oared for by a committee consisting of Hon. G. W. Mason, Rev. H, R. Bender, and Messrs. John T. Beardsley, William H. Brown, Thomas Yardley, R. I. Fleming, F, M. Ross, James Brown, Charles F. Mann, Hon. J. W. Smith, J. H. Ager and Hiram Myers, who were further assisted by local committees in several parts ofthe county wbicn had suffered severely. This district, besides large quantities of supplies, received $72,174.17, of whioh the Commission sent $47,195.00. Six hundred persons received money in sums of from $7 50 to $600. It Was a Surprise Party. From the North East (Pa) AdvertUer. A well-known farmer went to Erie Saturday evening to buy a new suit of clothes, and after making the purchase be got a jag. While coming home at night the idea came into hit maudlin brain to surprise his wife by appearing dressed in fine clothes. Stopping in the road be undressed and threw his old suit into a creek, not knowing that he bad lost his new one out of the wagon. Unable to find either suit he was obliged to wander home arrayed like a Zulu, and of course succeeded in surprising bis wife. President Harrison's Weight. After the review at Camp Hartranft the agents of the Adams Express Company had the pleasure of taking the avoirdupois of President Harrison and some of tho lesser lights at camp. President Harrison weighed exactly 193pounds; General Soho-field, 205; Postmaster General Wanamak-j er, 183, and Attorney General Miller, 101. TERSELY TOLD HAPPENINGS. 8HAMS AT THE HOSPITAL. All tho Lata News and Views of the Oity Up to 3:00 P.M. GOTTEN UP IN A EE AD ABLE POEM A Chapter or Accidents-Where There Was Detraction-Reformed Sunday School Flenlc-The Chirp of the Cricket-Killed on the Ball-Ylewere Appointed-They Assisted- Robert Wilson, � young man who resides at Renovo, was in this oity jester-day, and attempted to jump a fast freight train at Clinton avenue station about 4 o'clsck in the afternoon. The train was moving rapidly and the young man missed his footing and fell. One of bis legs was crushed below the knee by the oar wheel passing over it. He was carried to the residence of John Corns, on'Jessamine street where Drs. WaUon and Ball amputated the injured limb. Furst Bros, mill team ran away at Mill Hall yesterday afternoon and the driver Just. Rosaman, was badly injured by the accident. The horses frightened at a locomotive on tbe Bald Eagle railroad. Tbe wagon struck against a telegraph pole, throwing Rossman heavily to the ground. His injuries, it is feared, are internal and may prove serious, The team was not hurt. Later in the day a second accident was barely prevonted at the same place -a train just missing the heads of a passing team. This is a dangerous crossing, and is made far worse by the location of the water tank at that point. A party of two gentlemen and two ladies were passing down East Water street last evening in a spring wagon drawn by two horses. Soon after crossing the canal bridge the breaking of a bolt allowed the wagon tongue to fall down and the horses attempted to run away. The driver however managed to control the team and a dangerous runaway was prevented. Where There Wee Destruction. O. T. Wynn, of Williamsport, on his return from a trip into Centre and Clinton oounties tells the Sun that the signs of the terrible work done by the flood of 1889 are still to be seen in the Nittany Valley, At Salons, in digging out the channel of the creek, all kinds of debris, such as demolished wagon beds, tables, bedsteads, etc., were found three feet under the ground. The course of tbe creek had been changed by the flood some four or five rods from the regular obannol. At the narrows the evidences of the work of the flood are indescribable. Excursion Notice. The Sunday School conneoted with Trinity M. E. church of thiB city will picnic at Nippeno Park on Thursday next. A special train will leave the avenue at 8:30 a. m., stopping also at the station. Tickets for the round trip 40 cents, for children from 5 to 12 years, 20 cents. A generous invitation is extended to any organization or individuals who may think proper to accompany ns. Label carefully all baskets. J. N. Wklliver, Supt. The Chirp of the Cricket. A small field of oats on Dr. Ball's farm opposite this oity was cut yesterday and the wind last night blew over the oats Btubble. The chirp of the cricket has been heard for several evenings, and according to the old saying frost may be expected in six weekB from the time the crioket chirp iB heard. Viewers Appointed, The court yesterday appointed Messrs. Jesse Merrill, 8. D. Ball, Jacob Brown, O. T. Noble, J. W. Harris and H. Simon as viewers to view tbe proposed extension of Williame alley from Vesper street to Liberty street. Tbe viewers will also assess damages. Killed on the Rail. Daniel R. Baylor, one of the oldest residents of Williamsport, was struck by an engine of a Northern Central train at Minnequa yesterday morning and instantly killed. The old gentleman who was very deaf, stepped in front of an approaching train. Death of Mrs. Rines. His. Doroas Rines, wife of George Rines, of Allison township, died last night at her home, aged 65 years, 1 month and 20 days. A husband and five children mourn her loss. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 o'clock, and Interment at Hamburg. Reformed Sunday School Picnic. On Thursday the Reformed Sunday school picnio at Sugar Run. The steamer City ot Lock Haven will convey the school to and from tbe grounds. The boat will leave the wharf at the foot of Mill street at 8:30 a. m. ! The ropular Lady Teachers. The four leaders to-day among the contestants for the handsome ohinaware at Satterlee & Fox's are respectively Annie Fisher, Pearl Klapp, Mary Kean and Jennie Walters. Wonld-Be Patient. Who Are Looking- for ' a Place to Live In. They had a "fake" or "sham patient" in tbe Pennsylvania Hospital recently, but the dootors and Nurse John McCann wcro too sharp for him and thus declined to give him what he was after-free board and lodging for a week. His name was Patrick Kelly and be was about 46 years old, and such a dilapidated speoimen of humanity the Pennsylvania Hospital, noted for such sights as it is, bad not seen for many a day. His clothes were in tatters and he needed a bath the worst way. He walked into the receiving ward about 2 o'clock and informed the nurse that he had hurt bis arm. "When did yon do it?" asked the nurse. "Yesterday." "Are you sure?" "Well, I think it was to-day." "You're certain, are you?" "No, it was day before yesterday." "Hurts yon, does it?" "Yes," said the man with a groan. "I want to stay here till it's well. I've got no home." Dr. Downs was called down and examined the man's arm, but found there was nothing the matter with it. "I guess I will have to give you ether," said the doctor. "What for?" 'Yourarm will have to come off." "On, no, doctor dear! All I want is a bandage." The doctor laughed and the nurse twisted abandage around the fellow's arm. "Are you a thief?" the man was asked. "Yes, I am, and it takes a smart man to be a thief." Kelly went out all fixed up to beg for obarity on account of having a broken arm. A few days ago the ambulance bronght in a man who lay on his back groaning as though bis last hour had come. He claimed to have been hurt in the back, and every time he was touched he would give a howl of anguish. He was examined and nothing was found the matter with him. "Well, John," said the doctor, "the man is in a bad way, does he want to stay in?" "Yea, doctor," broke in tha patient, "I have no plaoe to go." "All right, poor man; we'll fix you up and give you the best of care. John, get the Instruments ready." "What's that?" asked the would-be patient. "That's all right," said John. "We are going to cut you open and take ont a piece of your liver. You've got an abscess on it." The man got a whiff of the ether and that was enough. "I've got no absoess," he shrieked, getting up from tbe cot, although the minute before he declared he could not move, and with that he snatobed up his ooat and hat and stalked out of the ward amid tbe laughter of the doctors and the nurses. Fakes are common at the Pennsylvania, but they never fool the doctors.-Philadelphia Press. Dusting Will Disappear. We have a friend in the trade whose mind is oontinually running to labor-saving inventions, says the Upholsterer. He has now arranged a series of fans so as to produce a auotior. that will draw up dust from the floors or furnishings of a house. Hear him: "The motor is simple, and one has only to put tho machine in tbe center of tbe room, wind her up, then get ont of the way. When in motion the dust comes from all parts of tho room and iB immediately sucked up by the fans^ into a box. In two minutes it will 'sweep a room of ordinary Bize. After sweeping youp floors you reverse tbe forae, so as to have tbe suction come from tbe top instead of the bottom. Place a funnel over the machine whioh has a long hose attached, then you go around your furniture Wherever you hold tbe hose tbe dust iB immediately sucked through into the box. In five minutes there is not a particle of dust to bo seen around the room. Besides collecting tbo dust, this machine will ool-lectall the inseots of a house. Imagine for a moment the ceiling of your room being filled with mosquitoes. Bring in your lightning oleaner, set the hose and draw it across tho ceiling, and the mosquitoes disappear." The Girl Who Knows All. Naturally it isn't you or your bast friend; but you certainly know her, and just as certainly you dislike her. When yon dislike people there is one thing you Bhould always do, aud that is-look well at their faults and make up your mind that you are not going to fall into tbem. This girl, who is quite too general to be pleasant, is the girl who, having learned something yeBterday, knows everything. She makes herself obnoxious by flaunting reoently acquired knowledge, concluding always that the people who are quiet are ignorant.-Ladies' Home Journal. INSURGENTS TRIUMPHANT They Defeat the Government Troops in a Desperate Battle. 1,000 OF THE COMBATANTS FALL The Navy Joins the Revolutionists and tbe Overthrow of the Government Appears Assared-The Artillery Does Some Heavy Bombardiog During the Day-Details of the movement. Buenos Ayrks, July 20.-The revolutionary movement continues to spread. The fighting between the Government troops and the revolutionists to-day has been desperate. The Government forces were defeated, and 1,000 of tbem were killed or wounded. The navy has joined the revolutionary movement. Insurgent artillery bombarded the Government house and the barracks to-day. A twenty-four hours' truce has been arranged between tbe opposing forces. The triumph of the revolutionists appears to be assured. cause of the revolutioh. London, July 28.-A dispatch from Buenos Ayres states that tbe leaders of the revolutionary movement belonged in that city. They were incensed because the best posts under the government were given to men from the Provinoe of Cordova. Senor Roca will probably assume tbe Presidency, as it is believed be is the only man oapable of restoring confidence. Previous to tbe arranging of the Armistice, war ships, whioh bad just joined tbe revolutionists, bombarded the Loyalist stronghold. a depressed stock   exchange. London, July 28.-A feeling of depression prevails on the Stock Exchange. Argentine and Truguayan issues are practically unsalable, and have deolined from 4 to 9 per oent. president coleman returns. Paris, July 28.-A despatch -from Buenos Ayrea sent at 10 a. m. says that lha Government troops have been largely reinforced and that President Celman has returned. Methodist Bush Meeting. A Methodist Bush Meeting in oharge of Rev. James Hunter will be held in the grove near tbe P. &. E. railroad station at Wayne, commencing on Thursday, Aug. 7th and continuing over the following Sunday. Rev. Hunter will have a couple of other ministers to assist him and as the grounds have been cleared np and put In good condition a large attendance is anticipated. Rev. Hunter held a successful meeting in 1866. Refreshments will be served on the grounds on Sunday to all those who wish tbem. The grove is a very pretty one and is well located for such a meeting. It is near to the railroad and accommodations can be seoured among the residents for those who go unprovided. BABE   BALL   RECORD. The Three Organizations and Their Standing to Date. national league. Pittsburg-New York 4, Pittsburg 2. Cincinnati-Boston 2, Cincinnati 1. Chicago-Chioago 12, Philadelphia 4. Cleveland-Cleveland 8, Brooklyn 4. players' league. Buffalo-Buffalo 23, Philadelphia 9. Pittsburg-Pittsburg 4, New York 0. Cleveland-Boston 5, Cleveland 4. Chicago-Chicago 7, Brooklyn 6, Eleven innings. american associaton. Philadelphia-Toledo 7, Athletio 6. Rochester-Louisville 12, Rochester 2. Brooklyn-Brooklyn 6, Columbus 2. Syracuse-St. Louis 12, Syracuse 1. Standing of the Clubs. national league. Won. Lost PhlladolpMa.-.M   27 Brooklyn.........61   20 Boston.............52   30 Cincinnati.......47   32 players' league. Won. Lost. Boston..............50   28 Brooklyn.........48   36 New York........43   36 Chicago............43   38 american association. Won. Lost. Louisville-......48    28 8t. Louis..........45   32 Athletic...........44    35 Rochester........43   31 Won. Chicago...........41 NewYork........Si Cleveland.......22 Pittsburg........18 Won. Pblladelphla...43 Pittsburg.........34 Cleveland........33 Buffalo.............19 Lost. 87 48 56 61 Lost. 3  }or and mother, East Cburoh street. Two Steamers In Collision and Many Excursionists Mlatlns;. Baltimore, July 28.- The steamer Virginia, of the Old Bay Line, which left Baltimore this evening for Norfolk on ber regular trip, was in collision with the steamer Louise, on her way to Baltimore from Tolohester Beaeh, on the Chesapeake Bay, with fifteen hundred excursionists. The collision ooourred off Fort Carroli. It is said that the collision resulted from theeffoits of tbe steamers to avoid a schooner in tow of a tog boat The weather was thick and rainy. The Virginia Btruok the Louise on tbe starboard side on the aft side of tbe wheel, eutting away the outer work and crashing Into the saloon. The Virginia's stem was badly twisted and her bow stove. Three bodies bad been recovered up to eleven o'olook. It Is supposed others have been lost. The steamers eame to Baltimore under their own steam. Resolutions of Respect. Whereas, The death of oar beloved sister, Hiss Nellie J. Myers Is a painful loss to tbe Sabbath school, the Baptist cburoh of this oity, the school hereby express its sentiments relative thereto in tbe following resolutions. Boohed, That we submissively bow to God's call to our sister teacher to come home. RenUed, That we gratefully point out her life as one worthy of emulation by each member of this Sabbath school. Resolted, That we deeply mourn the loss of one of our number whose life was so promising ot good work for her Lord. Saolced, That, with the bereaved family to whom we offer our sympathy, we confidently hope to meet ber again In tbe home of eternal joys. Resolved, That a oopy of these resolutions be sent to tbe family of the deceased and be inserted in the local papers, also a oopy be preserved by the society. W. J. Wolvrbton, Jshtiik Monroe, May Scbuylkk, Committee. A Pugilist la Tew a. Ed. Smith, the celebrated pugilist, who seught Jackson, the oolored champion, at Chioago last May bat was robbed of the honors of the fight, is In tbe oity to-day arranging for an exhibition in tbe Academy of Music on Thursday evening. Smith's parents now reside at Benasette, Elk county. He is matched for ft fight with Jack Kilrain for a $5000 puna, at the Puritan Club, N. Y., the last of August Smith was bom at Birmingham, England, but is generally known as the Western Wonder. He has fought with and defeated a host of noted pugilists. His Isst fight was with Jim Daley, which he won in 7 rounds. They Assisted. William Bently, of this city, assisted tbe Woolrich Sunday school on Sunday with cornet aooompaniamenta to the singing, and Mr. Fleming Trexler.of Beech Creek, sang a solo. There were earnestaddressee made by the pastor Rev. Mogart, and tbe Superintendent of the aohool, Mr. John Rich. Killed by a Freight Train. Williamsport, July 28.-Daniel R. Saylor, aged 7", a resident of this oity, was struck by a freight train to-day at Minnequa Springs and was instantly killed. He was the father of Dr. Jean Saylor Brown, a prominent female physician, who Is staying at Minnequa. .  � SAXONA CHIPS. LSpecial Correspondence.] It is getting quite dry in our valley. Mr. D. B. Krape, of Williamsport. apent Sunday with bis father. Rev. Heckert will preach in the Lutheran Cburoh next Snnday morning. Rev. S. E. Furst, of New Berlin, Union connty, is spending bis vacation with his friends here. Candidates sre quite numerous and very sociable in their visits to Salons, Each are quite oonfident of the nomination and election. Krape & Eddy are doing a big business in tbeir buggy shop. They are now putting up a fine hearse for themselves and expect soon to begin tbe undertaking business. Mr. Martin Herr, who fell from a cherry tree July 4th is yet lying in a very critical condition at his home. There has been but very little improvement in bis condition. The festival of the Lutheran congregation at tbe Public Hall, Friday evening, Saturday afternoon and evening, August 1st and 2nd, is looked forward to with great pleasnre. A good time is expected. Come one, come ail. Rev. H. A. Dietterich and lady will spend their vacation in Columbia eonnty, their native borne. Miss Tillie and Willie will spend theirs in White Deer, Union county. All will leave 8alona August 5th. Persons desiring to see a natural curiosity should visit W. H. JJornblazer, of Lamar. He has a four year old mare with five feet. The fifth foot starts at tbe pasture joint, on the inside of the right front leg and is peifeotly formed.   

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