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Lock Haven Express: Saturday, July 19, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - July 19, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                f-.r.^  _.J;v>- ^v*-' .5^^ T-i.Av.-th'yi.-' NINTH YEAR-NO. 119. LOCK HAVJEN, 1JA.. SATURDAY. JULY^l9. 1S90. PKICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS kFnSLOE kkothbks---fubmshkks CURRENT COMMENT. A mono the moet successful legal tlrnis in Laueiog, Mich., said to be the one whose shingle sayp, "Judge Luoas & Wifr, Attorneys." The increase in the number of poBt-officee during the past year, waB the largeBt in any one twelve mouths iu the history of the country. Foraker's speech eulogizing Harrison Sherman, McKfnley and Foster -indicates that there has been a general burial of Kepublican hatohetB in Ohio. Some of our American cities, Chicago for instance, may eventually discover that lasting prosperity depends quite aa much upon the character of the population upon its numbers. General Fremont's poverty was for him a notable mark of distinction. If he had been willing to follow questionable methods in bis dealings with the Govern merit he might have died many times n millionaire. The nation should promptly make just provision for his widow. One of the .most interesting, ablest and most instructive articles on ''Sewage, and What Shall Be Done With It," constitutes the supplement of the Uarper'n Weekly just out. It is written by Dr. G. W. IIos-mer, who unites the knowledge of a phy. sician and BauHary specialist, with the trained ability of an old journalist. New York's population has increased, since 1S80, 23 4 10 per cent. This is at enormous increase for a city of over a mil lion Inhabitants, and has probably never bten equalled in the history of the world. In the preceding decade the growth was at the rate of 28 per cent., but in 1870 New York had not yet become one of the millionaire cities. A MILLION DOLLAR FIRE The Western Union Telegraph Company's Kew York Building In Flames THRILLING BESOUE OF EMPLOYES With all their worrying over tbe surplus, the He Kid ley bill and tbe Federal Election bill, Democratic editors are having a bard time of it through the heated term. They might just as well keep oool and not get excited. The voters of the country decided that the Republican party should administer tbe government, and it proposes to do it. The silver bill will go into effect on August 13, after which the silver coinage of the country will proceed at the rate of 4,500,000 ounces per month until July 1, 1891, after which the amount of silver dollars coined will be a*, the discretion of tbe Secretary of the Treasury. The oDly people likely to be benefitted will be tbe silver producers, who will njw have a constant market for their bullion at advancing prices. Congressman Breckenridge, of Ar* I kansas, who sits in the seat which was contested by John M. Clayton at the time the latter was assassinated, and who has been reviling all those who have taken part against him, is now compelled to listen to words of stinging condemnation such as he hardlj anticipated. So far, he does not show up in a very favorable light, although he will no doubt be allowed to retain bis seat, as tbe former contestant is now dead.__ They Had Met Before. "Now, air," began the attorney for the defence, knitting his brows and preparing to annihilate the witness whom he was about to cross examine, "you say your name is Williams. Can you prove that to be your real name ? Is theie anybody in the conrt room who can swear that yon haven't assufrfed it for purposes of fraud and deceit ?" "I think you can identify me yourself," answered the witness. "I? Where did I ever seo you before, my friend?', "I put that flcar over your right eye twenty five years ago, when you were stealing peaches out of father's orchard. I'm the same Williams.1'-Chicago Iri-(tune. Third Wurtl Young American*. TheYoungAmerican base ball cl ub ofjthe Third ward, went to Farrandsville to day to play a game with a juvenile nine of that place. Tbe names of the Young Americans aro Clarence Troxell, Frank Candor, Charley Strayer, Will Ryan, Warren Wynn, Will Hiller, Nels. Zuber, Ed." Caruth and Will Probst. Tbo scoring will be done by Georgo Williamson, and Fred Troxell will act as umpire. A telegram received at2 p. m. states that at the end of fourth inning game stood 11 t-j2in favorofLock Haven. Sadden Death at Hvner. Mr. Ja."Ob Goodman, a resident of Hyner, took his invalid wife to the depot at that place this morning, fur the purpose of takiDg her to the hoBpital at WiUiamsport for medical treatment. Before the arrival of Day Express, the train on which they intended going, Mrs. Goodman died in the depot, the ride from her residence haviug been too much fur her weak constitution. Mr. and Mr�. Goodman were formerly rosideuts of this city. A N�iv Ice W�euD. P. M. Christie, tho ice dealer, has put a new delivery wagon on the Btieots. The Great Eight Story Structure Now a Partial Kuin-The As to elated Free* Which Occupied the Top Floor, a Heavy Loaer Through the toss of Valuable Records-Saved From the Flames. New York, July 18 -This morning shortly before 7 o'clock flames burst from the switch board of the Western Union operating room on the seventh floor of that company's building, corner Broadway and Dey streets. So rapidly did they extend to the woodwork that the escape of the employes by the stairways was cut off and a number were lowered from the windows by means of ropes to the tops of adjoining buildings. So far as now known there was no loss of life. The fire extended from the fifth through three upper stories of the building, including the operating rooms of the Associated Press office, the executive offices of tbe Western Union and upper floors, devoted to reBtaU' rant and for living purposes. Telegraph communication with outside points was badly crippled. There was no loss of life, but seven persons had miraculous escapes. The operators bad begun to arrive to begin their day's work and about fifty men and young women had reaohed the operating room, when tbe fire was discovered in the distributing room. hemmed in by flame. The tlame spread with lightning rapidity and the fifty operators barely escaped with their lives by rushing down the stairs through the smoke and flames. The flames worked their way rapidly to the upper floor, where the Western Union Company's restaurant was located. On this floor were four men and three young women, who were employed as waiters, cooks, etc. All exit was cut off when these seven discovered that the building was on fire, and tbey ran about the restaurant screaming and wringing their hands, when one of the men thought of tho trap door to the roof. This he pushed open, and the affrighted prisoners climbed out on the roof. Their position was then not greatly bettered. All tho houses surrounding the burning building were muob lower, and for those on the top of it to jump meant death. In the meantime the smoke and blaze were becoming greater, and a cry of horrror arose from the thousands of upturned faces in the street as the perilous position of those on tbe roof became realized, for it seemed impossible that tbey could be rescued. saved from the flames. The women on the roof screamed and wrung their hands and the men Bbouted for God's sake, save us." Three alarms had been sent out aod in a short time fourteen engines were pouring tons of water ; into the blazing building. A long ladder ' was placed on the roof of No, 8 Dey stieet; against tha rear of the burning building, bat it did not reach within fifty feet of the i roof of the latter building. Two firemen, I however, scaled the ladder, and overreach-'. ing the top threw a long r-pe to those on tbe roof and it was made fast by one of the brave girls. The firemen then nulled , themselves band over hand up the rope to tbe roof and amid the cheers of thousands of throats from below they let the seven down with a rope to places of safety. The i rescue was accomplished Justin time, as 1 a moment later the fUmes burst through tbe wlndoWB and cornices and booj en , veloped the roof. Tbe work of the engines j finally gained control of the fU mes. j extent of the fire. The entire upper part of the building � was gutted and every telegraph iustru | ment rendered useless. It is surmised that the fire originated from tbe electric light wires. Had tho fire broke out an hour later the loss of life might have been numerous. Fully 700 men and girls are employed in the building. The offices of the Associated Press, which occupied the eighth fljor, were > completely gutted. What the tire failed to \ destroy was completed by water. Tbe ruin of the operating room rendered every Western Union wire on Mnfbattan Island useless. The Associated Press opened its headquarters in.Jersey City, every facility being afforded them by the officials of the Pennsylvania railroad, and before the fire was under control tbe various circuits of the Associated Press were in active operation. The Associated press loses instruments, type writers, furniture and all of its books, papers, and records dating from 1844 and a valuable reference library; all of tbe material for the history of tbe growth of tbe press in America, contained in letter book and filed, was destroyed. The loss of the records and papers is irreparable. loss of the western union. Tho Iobb of tbe Western Union Telegraph Compauy is very large and will re-]uire a long time to replace the matter. The large switch board in the operating room alone cost a quarter of a million of dollars. Tbe building of the Western Union Telegraph Company is eight Rtorirs high and has been for years a groat nttd iinposing landmark on Broadway. Tbe live lower floors aro filled by otUccs of come of the greatest railroad marruateB in the country. The vast Hyatt1 m of tho Pa c:flo Railroad is operated through in-u.rue-tiouH given from tho Western Union building. Jay Gould. Sydney Dillon, Dr. Norviu Green and other great financial magnates have offices in tbo building. It is estimated the loss is over a million dollars. A TLKASURK YACHT SCNS It Collided With a Steamer at the Thousand Islands and Fiv� Lives are Last. Utica, N. Y. July 38-Tne steamer St. Lawrence at 10:30 last night collided with the private steam yacht Catherine near Alexandria Bay. The Catherine had a party of twelve on board. The names of the drowued were: Edward Pemberton, Mrs. Edward Pemberton, Mis. W. D. Hart, Miss Margaret Henry, (all of Bradford, Pa ,) and Engineer John Senedchall, of Alexandria Day. The captain of tbe yacht was Joseph SeneschaH, of Grenadier Island, who owns the craft. The St. Lawrenoe was returning from a search light excursion around the islands, and had put out its electric fi�sh light on entering tbo American channel from tbe Canadian side below the scene of the accident. Passengers on board the iHt. Lawrence Bay that they saw the yacht making directly across tho bow of tho St. Lawrence, and it bad nearly crossed when the crash came, carrying away tbe stern of the yacht. L
                            

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