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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: July 18, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - July 18, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEA.K-NO. 118. LOCK HAVEN, FA.. FRIDAY. JULY 18. 1890. PKICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS KIMSL.OK BKOTHKUS - - - FPBl-ISHltBS CURRENT COMMENT. With 100 gallons of water per day per individual It does seem as if New Yorkers should be able to keep clean and cool. Thkhk were four hundred and twenty marriage oeremonies performed in Camden last month. The main-ohance clergy there aro still carrying on a thriving business. It is estimated by Representative Lodge that the Federal ElecMun bill introduced by him, and passed by the House, will require for its enforcement, should it become a law, an annual expenditure of $10,-000,000.        _ SesatOR Fryb, in replying to Secretary Blaine's letter, asked if be knows what Spain would exchange for free sugar and also asks Secretary Blaine if he ean give a list of the artiolea she would receive. The platform of the Tennessee Democratic Convention declares openly and unequivocally in favor of the free coinage of silver. This is ia line with the platforms of all the Democratic State conventions that have met this year. Jojjnstown contains about 2,000 more inhabitants to day than she did before the disaster which drowned 3500 of her people a year ago. Could there be a better msui-festation of Pennsylvania pluck and enterprise than this fact affords? "Tue Federal election bill if it becomes a law, shall be tried in the North as well as in the South," groitU Roger Q. Mills, of Texas. Of oourse it will Brother Mills -that's the calculation-but you don't find the North kiokiog do you? Although it was officially announced a few days ago that the cholera in Southern Spain was on the deo'ine, the litest news emphatically showB that it is growing worse and spreading rapidly. It will be a marvel if it shall be confined to that country. The census enumerators who took the population of Washington are tow being paid off gradually. They are more fortunate than were those ten years ago. There was no appropriation available to pay them until nearly three months after they bad finished their work. Every instance of "heat prostration"- commonly called sunstroke-should operate as a warning against excessive exertion, whether in the sunshine or in the shade, whether Id the workshop or in the kitchen, while the temperature is running high. And likewise against exoessive eating or drinking-especially the drinking of alcoholic liquors. The Sheffield people still seem to labor under the hallucination that by holding mass meetingB and protesting against our proposed tariff bill they may be able in some unexplained way to ward off the evil which tbey think is impending. At a meeting held on Monday tbey resolved to call on the Government to take protective measures against the bill, which they say threatens their trade with this onnntry. Of course, we shall pass the bill all the same. Congress is legislating in the interests of the United States and not in those it Sheffield. A STORM SWEPT STATE. For tbe next few days Mt. Gretna will rival Atlantic City beraelf id the variety and character of her attractions, tihe will have tbe entire National Guard of tfao State, some eight thousand io number, camped upon her green si open, while Uncle Sam wilt send horse, foot and artillery to share iu the mimicry of war. Such an encampment of soldiers is nowhere to be seen in the United States. Along with these will be daily picnic excursions from Lancaster, Ilarrisbiirg, Reading and the-Burrouoding cities,which will fill the vast,wood� with unprecedented crowds of men, women and children. Special ktatet to boiton. A letter from E.'* 9. Harrar, Division ticket agent of tlfe Feooy)ramj� Httlroad received by A*. J. Mil:!ca, Adjutant of John S. Bittuer Pi�; Q. A H. states that the agent of tbe Penn'a Kiifro&d in this citf will be supplied with tiokoU to Boa ton and return to be issued on account of the G. A. K. National Encampment to be held in August next. The tickets will be sold from August 8th to 11th good to return August 20th. Kate for the round trip via. the Sound fel I via. rail, steamer Maryland $12.55, t'-nnntetTtsitere Ktto liis been eree'ed by 11. F; Biker, about two miles oast of Cas-tanca, on the road loading from Lock Haven to Wsyne and there will be a daneu on Saturday, 1SH1: itist., from 2 to 12 o'clock p. tn. Music furnished by Prof. Win. Young. Ice cream, lemonade and refreshments. A geaeral invitation is extended. Hacks will convey parties to nnd from tbe place at reasonable rates. �McdIo *t Cllntondal*. A large picnio will be held at Clinton-dale, Saturday July 2Gtb, by the members of the different churches of the Erangeli o�l circuit of Nittany Valley, of which Rev. King Is the pasior. Tbe Zi�n band will be present to enliven the cccaaion with mtifttc. All aro itj.ritod to Attend aud enjot a day iu the wooers. The Little Tamil Afrnla. After the r�in yesterday tho little touds made their appearance again as plenty as ever. They were especially numerous on Water street and hopped about over tbe sidewalks and ou tbe streets quite lively. Thia morn ing but few of them could be iseen. A UOOI> MAN fluXC. Death of ]�. U. Catupliflll at WillUmppnrt Tbarlday Kvenlng. Mr. E. B. Campbell, General Superintendent of tbe Dodge Mills, died on Thurs. day evening at bis late residenoe, No. 52& Grier street, Willlamsport, after a brief illness from Bright'* disease. Io the death of Mr. C. Williameport loses oi.e of its best citizens, tbe poor a true friend, the ohuroh an active, libera.! and devoted member, and his family an affectionate husband and father. No man waa more thoroughly known and respected throughout the West Branch Valley. His was an honorable and valuable career, and bis departure will be sincerely mourned in this oommunity. From the Willlamsport Gunite and Bulletin we oopy the following brief sketch of his busy, honorable and valuable osreer: Ebenezer B. Campbell was born in Johnson, Scotland, March 4, 1820. He oame to this oountry in tbe year 1836, at the age of sixteen years, landing at Sew York. The day after his arrival in* New York, he secured a position in Scheiflin's drug store on Canal street and remained there fire years. In 1841 be left New York to accept a clerkship in the store of A. C. Bush in Tioga village; in 1843 be went to Wellsboro to serve as a clerk in the store of C. andJ. Robbins, where he remained until 184S, when be entered the employ of Phelps, Dodge & Company, looating at Manchester Mills. He took charge ol all tbe business of the firm in Tioga county. From there he removed to Phelps Mills, still in tbe service of the oompany, and while there supervised the building of a bsw mill and dam for Messrs. Phelps, Dodge    31 Won. Lout. Philadelphia...47   28 Brooklyn.........w   28 Cincinnati.......43   '28 Boston.............4S   29 Brooklyn......_.4'Z Ptillailelplila.,.38   35 Won. Lost. New York........38   33 Flttsbn".-_____SB   38 Cleveland........'A   37 Buffalo.............IS   46 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. Won. Lost.[ Won. Lost. Athletic....._____43   27   ColnmbuB________3S   35 Lonlsvllle.______41   27   Syracuse._______ni   its St. Louis..........35   32   Toledo..............28   37 Rochester........33   32 'Brooklyn.......-20   47 A Chllda Gruel Treatment. Nkwburoh, N. Y., July 17.- The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children to-day caused the arrest of Eliza Steokler, a German woman, charged with imprisoning her 9-year old daughter and allowing her none of the advantage* or privileges of life. For six years the child has been confined in a kitchen, with closed blinds, except wben she was occasionally given an airing in tbe yard. Tbe woman bad become insane from trouble and the long confinement had made child an Imbecile and she could soaro'ely speak a word. Tbe mother was Bent to the Almshouse and tbe ohild to the Children's Homo. Mrs Mjinuind's Funeral. The funeral of Mrs. Eliza Sigmund, widow of Samuel F. Sigmund, Sr., will take place trom the residence of her nephew, Mr. Jas. F. Till, to morrow afternoon at half past two o'clock; inter men! in Highland cemetery. Attempted Highway Kobbsry. Last night Prof. O. W. Kitohell, a member of the Normal Sahool faculty, waa returning to the school building from tbe depot after the arrival of tbe midnight train. Between the Penn'a railroad crossing on West Main street and Fairview street, be was attacked by several men, who suddenly threw a quilt over his head and then threw him down on tbe sidewalk.' Prof. Kitcbell when be found the tnen meant robbery called for help, and Harvey Smith, who was a short distance further up tbe Btreet, responded to hiB call as did several others wbo heard him. Tbe highwaymen fled, leaving behind them the quilt, which proved to have been taken from a room on the first floor of the Normal building earlier in the evening. Entrance to the room from whioh Ibe quilt waa taken was effected through a window. The fortunate srriv.il of Mr- Smith and others prevented the Professor from being robbed, although he was quite roughly handled. There is nothing missing from the building hut the quilt and a trunk rtrap. Latent   Go*#ip   About   You    and    Your Friends. Charies W. Scott, of Williamsport, and Hon. George It. MoCrea are Fallon House guests to-day. J. C. White spent yesterday in Williamsport with bis brother William White, who is quite ill. Mrs. James Levan, Miss Ada Stroub and Miss Msy MeClintcok are visiting friends at Corry. Mr. and Mrs. John Itubl, of Mifflin-burg,ar� guests of Mrs. George R. Stover, Henderson street-Mrs. E. P. Carskaddon and daughter, Miss Annie, have returned home from an extended visit with friends at Washington, D.C. Mrs. Jennie Williams returned yesterday from a two weeks visit with friends at North Bend. Sbe brought home with her tbe rattles which were taken from two large rattlesnakes killed in a wheat-field yesterday. Canse of His urlBr. Boston Herald. Lady (to small boy, who is crying) - What is tbe matter, my little man? Boy-We were playing ball,and I broke, that pane of glass over there. Lady-Well, I guess the lady will not care much abont it. Boy-'Taint that; the ball went through and sbe won't give it back. To Save the BJver Baaks.- ' loe floods are destructive to river banks and rip rapping with atone is a costly protection. The rebuilding of tbe big pier or icebreaker at tbe foot of Mill street Is proposed as a means of preventing: Water street from being gradually but Surely worn away by iee floods; The following communication la reference to rebuilding the pier has been received: To whom it mat concebn:-Tfia rebuilding of the big pier Known aa the "long pier" would be a protection to all property owners along the river bank from tbe law mill to tbe dam, and a great protection to the Boom Company and all lumbermen interested. Itajrould also be of great protection to the city, as' from year to year einee tbe pier has been down the loe has been cutting down the banks below the bridge at the rate' of three to five feet per year. By rebuilding the oity will be saved great expense.. Let it then be rebuilt by a subscription raised for the purpose and let those moat benefitted be tbe largest subscribers. Masy Citizens. He Knocked the Chief Down. A big woodsman, whom the chief of police of Renovo had placed under arrest, knocked the officer down by striking him with the handcuffs whioh were on his wrist*. The ReuoTO .fltoi says tbe woodsman stood over tbe prostrate officer and told him if tbe handcuffs were not removed immediately he would descend npon him again with greater force and perhaps fatal effect. The chief deliberated, took off the ouBs, and - tbe woodsman after ouraing him wildly moved on. The Btorm at Willlamapert.-' At Williamsport yesterday afternoon as is learned from the Gazette and Bulletin the rain was aooompained by a heavy fall of hail and the wind and lightning did considerable damage but no Uvea were lost. Some of the bail stonee weighed an onnoe and a half. A number of buildinge were Btruck by lightning, others wet* unroofed, and several small buildings wrecked, Tbe Btorm waa tbe most severe ever known in that vicinity. Funeral of J. r. Feeling.. The remain* of the late .3. F. Peeling were committed to their final resting plaoe' in Highland Cemetery yesterday afternoon.: Rev. Joseph Nesbitt conducted thefuneral services and the pall beaten .were' John Caldwell, William Beck, G. W. Bateheler, S. W. Caldwell, H. X. J arret* awl W. A. White, Esq. A large number iof friends fallowed the body to the cemetery, �.. Cp-Rlver Ittui. From the Benovo Record.       '' ~ . . / George B. MoRoa, the newly appointed associate judgr>, has announced bia name for nomination in the Republican newspapers of the county. It is not likely be will have any opposition, as it was generally oonoeded before the appointment that Whoever reoeived it would be the Republi-can candidate at the coming election. Will Rebuild.' Carey Bros. & Grevemeyer, whose large wall paper faotory at Philadelphia was destroyed last Sunday night, will. rebuild at once and will have a line of handsome new wall paper in the market early in 1891 In tbe meantime tbey have leased a large warehouse, which will be stooked with a full and complete line of tbe best productions of other manufacturers. Mei tings To-night. A speoiat meeting of Counoil will be held this evening at 7:30 o'clock and an adjourned meeting of tbe oity School Board at 8 o'clock. Canton Look Haven, I. O. O. F., will meet this evening at 8 o'clock for special drill. Juvenile Temple Notice. There will be a melting of tbe Juvenile Temple to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock in tbe Evangelical church.  All members are requested to be present Anna Lay, Sapt.   

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