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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - July 10, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTJH YEAR-NO- 111. LOCK HAVEN, PA.. THURSDAY. JULY 10. 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS &IXS1A>� BKOTHKKS---fUBLISBKKS CURRENT COMMENT. BiiiMrsGHAM, Alabama, will nut growl much over the census. Her population has increased 797 per cont. oinco 1880. In Iowa tbe com is already in tassel in some parts of tbe State and in excellent cooditioo everywhere. Winter wheat, rye and barley havo been harvested and everywhere tbe crops have been good. WiTH Gray and Cleveland in tbe ring, "and more a-coroing," thete is fun ahead for Republicans in watching the fight for the empty prize of the Democratic Presidential nomination of 1892. Govehnou Nicuolls, of Louisiana, bas done himself honor in gib brave veto of the infamous Lottery bill. lie has fought a good fight, and it is through no fault of his that the jobbers have been able to com round a two thirds vote over his veto. It appears that Bruiser Sullivan bas squandered his ill-gotten gains and is now in a condition of comparative poverty. Well, he needn't starve. He is stout enough to earn his own living, and if be would only go to work be might yet be of some use in tbe *orld. The cholera rtill maintains its grip in Spain. It has not yet extended itself to other countries, but the season for such extension bas not yet arrived. It is a long distauce between Spain and tbe Untied States, but the plauge has overcome it many a time and may again, unless the proper precautions are adopted. The Democratic Senatorial fight in this county is now on and promises to be a bard fought and close contest. C. S. Mo Cormick, Esq., was the first in the field and has been diligently at work for a couple of months putting his political fences in order. T. C. Hippie, Esq., has just an nounced his intention of trying again for the nomination and as he is a "hustler1' there is likely to be a good many holes in in the McCormick fences when the county convention meets. The Democratic canvass for -the political offices in Clinton county waxs warmer as the time for the convention apjfeaches. The field is full of candidates and there is going to be a good many disappointed ones. Each candidate appears to be looking out for himself and so far as is known no combinations have as yet been formed. Lock Haven is making a strong bid for the lion's share of the offices, with excellent prospects of securing tbe nomination* for Assembly, Protbonotary, Sheriff and Associate Judge and probably for Treasurer. This about fills the ticket and if there are any vacancies that the balance of the county cannot fill Lock Haven can supply the candidates. Joseph Shannon is a man residing at Beaver Falls, in this 8;ate. He is, be sides, a farmer and bas reached the mature age of sixty-three years. One would think, from theBO several circumstances, that Joseph was a man who bad cut his wisdom teeth long ago; but this is a mistake. He seems to believe that thousands of dollars are to be bad by the mere turning of a card. In fact, be tried the card-turning trick on last Thursday, in company with two sharpers, and actually believed be bad won $9,000. In order to prove that he could have paid, in case he had lost, he went to his bank and drew out $9,000, which tbe two swindling copartners, of coarse, appropriated and left him lament. BASK   BALL   RECORD. The Three Organization  find Their Stantl-Ioje to Date. kational league. New York-Chicago 3, New York 2. Brooklyn-Brooklyn 0, Cleveland 3. Philadelphia-Philadelphia   6, Cincinnati 1. Boston-Boston 19, Pittsburg 7. players' league. New Yo�-k- Wew York 18, Buffalo 4. Philadelphia-Pittsburg   1G,  Philadelphia 0. Brooklyn-Bmokljn 15, Chicago 9. Boston-Boston 1G, Cleveland 8. american association. St. Louis-Syracuse 12, Sc. Louis 5. Louisville-Louisville 3, Athletic 1. Columbus-Rochester 7, Coiumbus G. Toledo-Toledo 9, Brooklyn 3. SIX MEN FOUND GUILTY. Of the Murder of Sheriff Cross and Deputies in No Man's Land. SEE OUT OF ELEVEN AEE CONVICTED. A Case That Excited Great Interest, at it Involved a Legal 1'oiot as to the Jurisdiction of the United States-The Case Was Vicoroniily Contested by the Friend* of the Accused, Washington, July 9.-Attorney General Miller has received a telegram from the United States attorney at Paris, Texas, announcing tbe conviction of six of the men arrested for the murder of Sheriff Cross and his three deputies, iu No Man's Laud, in 1SSS. This case bas excited great interest in that section of the country, and it is said every effort baa been made to shield the murderers and to prevent their arrest and trial. The principal legal point involved was the jurisdiction of tbe United States over the offences committed in No Man's Land, aud after months of investigation the authorities at Washington denied that tbe oourts at Paris bad jurisdiction over tbe particular cases. Eleven men had been arrested iu Kansas and elsewhere for complicity in the murder, and they were accordingly taken to ^aris for trial with the result an already stated. Tbe telegram does not give the names of those convicted. T8K  DUNT.AU  DISASTER. SHOT BY A SALOON KEEPER. A W*I1 Known Lawyer Killed in n Row Over a Woman. Poktland, Ore ,July 9.*-C. H. Hewitt, a well known attorney, was shot and killed yesterday by Charles Bel grade, a saloon keeper. Belgrade then cut bis own throat from ear to ear with a razor and died soon after. The men had been drinkiag together at a late hour. Yesterday morning on arising they became involved in a quarrel over Belgrade's wife who is suing for a divorce aud for whom Hewitt was attorney. Belgrade seized a shot eun and fired strikiDg Hewitt in the breast. Hewitt ran from the room, closely followed by Belgrade, who fired auother shot killing Hewitt almost instantly. Belgrade theu locked himself in bis room and took his own life. The Proceedings of Confireni. Washington, July 9.-The House today adopted the resolution rcquostiag the President to furnish the House with the correspondence between the United States and Great Britain, touching the subject in dispute in Bearing Sea since March 4, 1S86. The conference report on the Con-eular and Diplomatic Appropriation bill as presented and discussed. Tbe discussion of the conference report on tbe Silver bill took up the entire time in the Senate to-day. A vote will .probably b? reached late to-morrow. Mordered by on Iocane Farm Hand. Scbanton, July 9.-Albert Curomirgs, an insane farm hand living in the eastern part of Susquehanna couuty, several miles from Thompson, yesterday morning murdered a farmor named Palmerton with a hoe, chopping the man's head iu many places. Cummings had threatened tbe lives of Palmerton's family, and the latter was going for help to restrain him when the murder occurred. The lunatic afterward tried to tang himself, but was overpowered and locked up by a posse of farmers. Editors for the Election nil). Washington, July 9.-Representative BeldeD, chairman of the Republican Congressional Committee, has issued an address to the Republican editors of the country, calling upon them to do their duty in urging that the Sonate promptly pass the Election bill, which the House deems absolutely essential to the purity of tbo election of its own members. Standing of the Clubs. national league. Won. Lost.| Won. Cincinnati.......42    22    Chicago............:il Brooklyn.........40   Hi   New York........at PhiLad2lpbift...4f>   Ufl  |Cleveland........10 Boston.............39   &  iPiitstmrg........10 players' league. Lost, Boston..............�� Chicago............S7 Pitubu-s:.........82 Brooklyn.........:1a Won. Lost. 20 Won. New York........:S3 Philadelphia...;� Cleveland........v5 Buffalo.............17 americas association. Won. Lost,! w Athletic...........40    24   jCoIurubus....... Lmiisvfile-.......37    2'}   ' l.olfulo............. St. Loui-t..........'i'J   1W   Syracuse......... itochester........Si   �)  'Brooklyn........ Fifty-Nine Live* Last in .Inpan. San Francisco, July 9.-At Osaka, Japan, Gfty-nine people were drowned June 10 at tho landing of a new sailiDg vessel. Pennsylvania Post matters Confirmid. Washington, July 9.-The Senate today confirmed tbe following postmasters iu Pennsylvania: W. P. Bach, at Putts-town; M. G. Bulger, at Brownsville; O. II. liollster, at Me.idvi.le; W. 11. Bennett, at Duncannon; T. F. Ramsey, at Way no; J. A. Kllieott, at MansGeld; E. M. Sales, at MoKeosport. in place of William E. Thompson, whose nomination was withdrawn. The Sundry Civil Hill. Wasiungton, July 9.-The Sundry Civil bill as reported to the Senate to-day b^ the Appropriations Committee, carries with it an appropriation of $31,241,680, an increase of 3,181,000. Tho estimates for tho year were $57,849,013. so that the bill ;ih reported is $0,552,172 Ichh than tho et>-ti mates, and $5,1)45,^58 moie than the bill of last year. Tho Cortmtr'fi Jnqueat TrjiiiR to Fix the Kesponslhility. PiT'tsr.L'RG, July 0 -A special from Dunbar says: The coroner's inquest has become a light as to who is to shoulder tho responsibility for the disaster, the owneis, the inspectors, or the mine boss. Inspector Keighley admitted that he had told the committee of miners he would close the mine if it was as bad as they thought, and that ho found its condition worse than they thought. Neither he nor the other inspectors could have closed the mine without a law suit, as the miue boss had made a report that fatal morning saying there was no gas in the mine. John Kerwin, who drove his pick into the bore hole, told a dramatic story of the ensuiug^fush of the water and gas and tho final explosion. Experts testified that they would have ustd a small drill in boring into the hole instead of allowing a man to pick in it. It developed that the company had made promises to remedy the defects in the mine. MOURNING AT MILL HALL. How a Pair of Swindlers Worked the Gullible People of Mill Hall. HOPING TO GET MUCH P0E LITTLE Adjourned Court. A session of adjourned court will be held Friday 18th inst. at 9 o'clock a. m. How to Keep Rnliy Healthy. Bathe baby onco a day-health depeuds much upon cloanllness; avoid tight bandaging; have regular hours for sleep; avoid strenuously the use of cftimiuatlveF, soothing syrups, sleeping drops,candy and cake, they arc fruitful causes of diarrhoja that at this season is likely to have serious results; fresh air in the cool of the morn-iog aud evening is life giving; boiled water cooled by ice-not ico water-is a proper thirst quencher; if baby has lost its natural nourishment it should be fed on milk diet alone; goat's milk is best and next to it cow's milk, especially in Summer; there is no safe substitute, as sago, airow root aud starchy foods cannot bs depended upon. .Each bottleful of milk should bo aweet-ened with^sugar and made lukewarm-be sure the milk is unskimmed; iuhoVweatb-er soald the milk as soon as it arrives, milk carelessly allowed to stand in a warm room spoils and becomes unfit food; if tbo milk should disagree with baby add say a tablespoonful of lime water to each bottleful; the botfte must bo kept perfectly clean, after usicg it should be rinse * Husbandb. A little man asking bow it happened that many beautiful ladies took up with but indifferent husbands, after mauy fine offers, was thus aptly answered by a mountain maiden: A young friend of hers, during a walk, requested her to go into a delightful canebrake and there get him the handsomest reed. She must get it in once goin^ through without turning. She went, aud comjrjg out brought him quite a mean reed, when be asked if that was the handsomest one sho saw. "Oh, no," replied she, ''I saw many liner as I went along, but 1 kept on iu hopes of a much better, until I had gotten thrpugh, and then was obliged to select the best that was left."-New York Ledger. IIuw Tito Chinamen Celebrated July 4th Two Chinese laundrymen at Treaton, N. J., left off 10,000 fire crackers at one time- in the street. Tho din was kept up one hour. Cannon crackers were used with tbe smaller ones aud the noise vas deafening. It wan thought that a toy store known to bo full of fireworks Was on fire, and an alarm was sounded. Three horseB rau away. Several women fainted and it took four policemen to keep tiiu crowd of people back. Sam Sing and Hop Lee are the Dames of tbe patriotic celestials. Murder Over a Chew of Tobacco. Sexbnakdoau, July 9.-John Judge, a hard character and a resident of the mining patches, was shot last evening by Richard Gasghan. lie will die. It was the result of a tight over a chew of tobacco. I.ouieana Lattery Kilt. Baton K'.fcE, July if.-The Senate-, by a vote of 2o io 12, postponed action on tho Lottery Bill un'il to-morrow as a special order, oue of tbe Senators, Smith, being absent. The Villager* Buy Vp vfartlUeis Jewelry AVit.li the Promt *e or n 1'rment to Each. Purchaser^-Tho Scheme Works Like a Charm and the Entertaining Con pie Do a Thriving; Baiineni. There were lively times in the usually quiet village of Mill Hall last night and a pair of nice looking strangers disposed of a lurge stock ol cheap jewelry to the peo pie of the town at good prices. Tbe two strangers were well dressed, gentlemanly iu manner aud polite and courteous as men could be. They applied to Mayor Mason yesterday afternoon for permission to sell jewelry, watches, etc., on the streets of Lock Haven last night but were refused a liconso. Later in tbe evening the men called at Peck's livery stable and hired a team and a two seated surrey, and with a driver for the dashing blacks went flying np tho avenue towards Mill Hall, where they did a land office business. Blankets for the horses, on which were the words "Goldentine Kit," gave the turnout a circuB like appearance as they dashed into tho village and when the team was halted ou a street corner a crowd quickly gathered. The strangers amused tho crowd with funny stories, and sold sleeve buttons and watch chains cheap, occasionally giving back to some person the money tboy had paid for tho article, aud promising before they left to give to each and every purchaser a prize. Purchasers were plenty and the quick sales lent a charm to the occasion that made tho quick witted salesmen all tbe more entertaining. Watches were disposed of at prices ranging from 85 to $25 until as >s estimated upwards of $150 changed bands and left tbe pockets of tho Mill Hall peo* plo to find a resting place in tho tin box the strangers carried. The crowd then begau to clamor for the distribution of prizes as promised, and the entertaining and enterprising naluameu made their words good by giving out prizes with a liberal hand. The prize was the same to each person, and was nicely wrapped in tisRue papor. When closely examined the prize proved to bo a pieco of soap one inch long and about au eighth of an inch square. While the distribution of prizes was in progress the word was given to the driver to "go" aud away went the dashing black team in the direction of Lock Haven, leaving the Mill Hall crowd in the dim distance. The strangers left this morning on Erie Mail and any one wanting to buy a watch cheap can get it in Mill Hall to day. Death of a Veteran. Flavel Jodun, a veteran of the late war, died at his home in Fiemington this morning, aged u4 years and 6 months. He served in the war of tho rebellion as a member of the 8th Penn'a cavalry. The fuueral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 2:30. The pall bearers will be Philip Walker, George Drake, John Chatham, M. E. Wilson, David Fultz and William Venatta. Ills Eightieth Birthday. Ou Tuesday Kov. Dauiel Hartman, of Mill Hall, celebrated bis eightieth birth-, day, and in honor of tho event a large number of his friends met at his residence, i They took with them ice cream, xake and other refreshments, and spent a most en- j joyable afternoon with the veteran minis- j ter of tho Gospel, who received their con-1 gratulations unjl good wishes with warmest th�\nJ-s. MAGIC OP THE COLLAR BUTTON. ViewlDRthe Bridges. The gentlemen appointed by tho court to view tho new iron bridges at Great Island visited the bridges today for the purpose of making the view. The names of tho viewers appointed are Jacob Scott, G. W. Sour, William A. Hanna, J. C. Q"''ggl*S Joseph Candor and J. F. Katnm. A Boy's Arm Krokrn. A Hale sou j>( Charles Hetzul was assisting to push an empty car at Brawn's planing mill yesterday afternoon wheu ho fell and was severely injured by ono of the car wheels. One of his arms was broken aud the Uosh badly lacerated. Dr. Armstrong gavo tho lad surgical attendance. Planing Mill Accident. William Monroe, a young man employed at IIIpplu's planing milt, had his left baud badly cut yesterday afternoon by a resaw. Dr. Watson dressed the wounds. Nnv Bane Hall Ground*. To-morrow evening at 7 o'clock tho X-iiltown club will play the Hill nine. The game will be played iu the new Price Park aL Third and Iiviu streets. ^ A Tale Illustrating Bow It ib That So Many Men are Bachelors. Detroit Free Press. Come here, CaBper Cringle, and sit by me, and I will draw a few pen pictures for your edification, and endeavor tu show tho cause of so many bachelors running wild in our land. In former years man married for tbe purpose of having some oue to sew shirt-buttons on wi en needed; but now that collar buttons have been invented tbe neeeasity of a wife is done away with. Tbe dearth of marriago comes not from the lack of means, love or opportunity. A cham pton has arisen-'tis the collar button! How does that oome?  Let me explain. "Once upon a time"-we believe that is correct-a chemist was at his deadly work in bis laboratory, aud like the witch in "Maobetb," he pranced around tbe seeth. ing cauldron, and, as he dropped each arti cle into the bubbling devil's broth, this awful incantation fell from his lips: "Round about the cauldron go. In the magic token's throw! Night key, freedom's badge of yore, Hb's a bachelor no more! Pipe, the solace of his life, Banished by a scolding wife! Club also to him la dead, Save when u�ed upon his head! TicketH lor the theatre? No! She will never let him go! Gin and bitters 7 'Twould be death, For she always smells his breath! Letters from the other girls 7 She has used them for her curls * Now combine, oh, flood and tire. Make the things that 1 desire. On my magic table show Matrimony's deadly foe!" A flash of flame with red the takes effect, an explosion follows that shook tbe room, and, lo! upon the mag'c table at his side gleaming like a star of ill omen-a collar button! "At last," he screamed, "at last I com pass my revenge! After years of torturel deal tbe state of wedlock a deadlier blow than it ever yet dealt me! 'Tis well! I can rescue my fellow man from the yoke that galls! Bring down tbe curtain until I can think and act."  * *        *        * A chang* of scene. The young bachelor of the olden time. He graBps aneedle as a crowbar, and tries to thread it. The needle is fine and tbe thread coarse-of course. We know the result. Perplexity perspiration, perhaps profanity. At last the button is on, adorned with bits of skin from the baohelor's fingers. Alas, it is too large for the button-hole. He seizes a knife aud jabs the Bhirt-band savagely. He goes too far. There is a yawning rent, which would make an excellent arm-hole, but as a button hole it is a dismal failure. Hark! What is that? The sweet tones of a female voice. What is the song she sings? His heart palpitates as ha listens: "Why don't the men propose mamma? Why don't the men propose?" He flattens his nose against the window pag� and looks out. She is young and she is beautiful, and she is sowing ! No, it isnTt! iTes, it ts ! A shirt! We know tbe rest. Tho young bachelor seks her out, pleads his cause, and leaves an accepted man.  * *        � # Not so with the moderu bachelor. Jle rises leisurely, fondles a pair of silk suspenders given him by his best girl, and proceeds to dress. His shirt, shiniog with polish from the laundry of One Lung, clings around his manly figure, and as he slips dainty collar buttons into it, he winks at a portrait of his "dearest dear11 bung over the mantel, and warbles in a happy voice: "It's different when you'ie married, QuIlu different when you're married." * * # # � Now, Casper, one scene more.   Last but not least, we draw  another picture.   It will be recognized by some of our married men who have been bachelors.   Who cannot recall tho old, old scene? Maria ! Maria !" Yes, dear." "No buttons on this shirt." "Ob, but there must bo." "Better tell me I lie ! I say there aiu'i!" "Stoop down, dear, if you want me to sew it on." And she stands on tip-toe, clutchiug needle and thread, and pressing his windpipe until his face is scarlet, while he exclaims: "Ouch, woman, that's my throat," etc., etc. #       #       * *        *        # Girls, tbo collar-button must go. Casper, my boy, look well at the pictures I have drawn, and choose ye therefrom. THE SCHEME OF A SWINDLER. He Works It On a Catholic Priest at Huntingdon With Partial Success. IT HAD A TEEY QUEEE APPEARANCE IMptlierln Raging* A correspondent of the Williamsport Sim writing from Jersey Shore says dip-theria has been ragiug among the children along Pine Creek for some time, and a number of deaths have occurred. The dise.iso is of a moat malignant form. Dnilimce Tor tins Third "Wartl. Tlio  work of digging trendies for a sewer on Fourth streot was begun yefctor-day.   Tho sower  will empty  into tho river. 1'lciik-lriK To Day. Tho Lutheran Suuday   school   class, taught by I. A. Shatter, is picnicing  at Nippeno park to-day.   A number of in-vitod gueBts accompanied tho class. A Catholic Priest at New York Called Upon by the Alleged Execotor of a Dead Han Who Left 3,000 to the Church-Draft, and Letters That Toxnad Out to Be For-serlee-Base Ball Record. New Yokk, July 9.-On tbe 1st of July a man calling himself Louis Lorew oalled on Rev. J. J. McDonald, a priest of tbe Roman Catholic ohurch at Huntingdon, Pa., and presented what purported to be a letter of introduction from Bishop Foley, of Detroit, Michigan. Tbe letter stated that Lerew was execotor of a man named Haruon, who had died and left a legaoy of $2,000 to his cburob, and that Lerew would pay it to bim. He gave Father McDonald a draft on tbe National Park bank, of New York, for $2,000 drawn to the order of Louis Lerew, dated Philadelphia, June 28, payable two days after date, and signed Hallowell Kieff & Company. Before be left Father McDonald asked him whether be bad incurred any ex* penseB, and Lerew replied that there would be a recording fee of five dollars. Tbis father McDonald paid him. The First National Bank of Huntingdon forwarded the draft for collection and received it back July 8th with the word "fraud" written across the face. In the meantime Father McDonald bad written to Bishop Foley and received a reply that tbe letter was a forgery. Ab Lerew attempted to secure only a smalj fee, and tbat only when suggested to him as be took a receipt for tbe $2,000 from Father McDonald; it is conjectared tbat this is only part of a plan to defrand tbe bank or individuals. One Woman's Idea of Mon�y. From the St. lxmls Republic. What is money anybow? It's desireaMe only because it will get you whatever you want. It will buy a buoch of red roses tbat will make Jennie smile and give you akisB for them. It will give you bours of untold happiness when it is used to bny a delightful story book. It will get a lovely frock and make the woman you love as pretty as a picture. It will also get you tbe picture if you want it. It will permit you to bear beautiful mu-sio and see fine acting. It will, in many cases, make well tbe sick and briog joy to those who have it not. It will build asylums for little orphans, homes for old people and hospitals for cripples. It w ill care for the babies who have no oue to care for them and mike them good, strong healthy citizenB. It will build temples to honor God and where man may say a prayer. It will do all tbis, but after all it will be of little worth unless it brings two pleasures, to the buyer, and tbe seller. Money, next to love, is the best thing ic the world to have, and when you get it just remember you can't take it away with you when you die, and so spend it judiciously-that is, where it will give the greatest happiness. Pay of County Commissioners. Tbe' pay of County Commissioners at present is $3.00 per day. Commissioners elected tbis fall will receive $3.50 per day, and will be required to make affidavits as to the number of days sfervipo. The statement going the ronnds tbat tbe new Commissioners would receive $4.50 per day is incorrect. The pay is fixed by Act of Assembly, and the Commissioners of Clinton oounty bad no part in having tbe act increasing tbe pay passed. A Deadly Cyclone. Muscat, July 9.-A terrifio oyclone has prevailed here and in tbe adjacent conn-try. Great damage was done in tbe eity aud surrounding country. Mauy houses, both here and on the plantation, were demolished. Tbe loss of life was appalling. Reports thus far received show that over 700 persons were killed. Jarors for September. At tbe adjourned court held last Saturday an order of court was made directing tbe drawing of Jurors for the September torm. Only tbe regular number of jurors are lo be drawn which is 24 grand jurors, 48 traverse jurors for tbe first week and 30 for tho second week. Death of nn Infant. Au in(aut. child of Mr. and Mrs. John Beutley, of Lookport, died this moaning. Whit. Hess left this morning for Win-terburn where he bas accepted a situation as lumber shipping olerk for Merrill & Co. SORB ETCS IN CHILDREN. About One-Third of all Blindness Due to Neglect in Infancy. Nearly one third or all the blindness in Europe and the United States has its origin in tbe negleoted sore eyes of Infants, says the Toutlia Companion. Not to speak of the lifelong suffering to which this affliction gives rise, it Is estimated that tbe expense of oaring for the 50,000 blind persons in tbe United States and the loss of their earnings amounts to over$7,000,000ayear. Says Dr. Burnett, ophthalmic professor in the Georgetown University: "It is doubtful if all: the epidemics of yellow fever and cholera for the last hundred years have cost the oountry as mnoh in money as have the ravages of ophthalmia neonatorum in ten years. Yet this is a disease whiob, in its incipieney, is easily ourable, and well-nigh absolutely preventable." Ophthalmia neonatorum is the medical term for inflammation of the eyas in new-born infants. There is an inflammation wbioh either gets well of itself or is removed by simple appliances, and benoe mothers and, names fall to apprehend the danger. Indeed, many physicians are not alive, to It, bot Dr. Williams, the eminent ophthalnist, of Boston, says, in his great work on the eye, that there is no disease more fatal, to tbe eye, when negleoted or: improperly managed, than ophthalmia neonatorum. "On the other hand, none offers . better results from judiolons .treatment." Apparently mild attacks sometimes develop into the more dangerous disease, and, therefore, every ease should have medical attention at once. ' Tbe first symptoms appear about the third or fourth day after birth-a slight reddish line along the eentre of the npper lid. On opening tbe lids the white of the eye is seen to be more or less reddened, and there is a slight amount of yellowish secretion. In a few honra the lids become enormously swollen, and a large quantity of thin, greenish-yellow floid esoapes. This secretion is highly contagious. All who handle tbe ohlld, or come in contact with the towels, rags, sponges, bedclothes, etc, need to be striotly on their guard. That tbe disease, even in its worst form, can be readily onred when oared for in season, and, what is better, oan be almost wholly prevented, is tbe testimony of all medical experts. Formerly from 7 to 13 per cent, of all tbe children born In the hospitals of Germany were affected with it Now it is almost unknown in snob institutions. � Outside of hospitals, however, the disease is still rife, because its dangerous oharacter is not generally understood. Young mothers bring their babes to the hospital too late, and. are filled with unutterable anguish when Informed, tbat their little ones will never see again. '.'Nobody told me it was dangerous!" they exclaim. "They said it was only a cold In the. eyes, and that if I pnt breast milk in them they wonld be all right."        \ An Honest Confession. Lancaster Inquirer. , . . It is an old adage that "an honest confession is good for the soul," and if it be true, the soul of Congressman Hemphill, of Sonth Carolina, ought to be greatly benefited by a confession made a few days ago in the Honse. During the debate on the Federal election bill he said: .   <...... "We realize that the negro is bar equal before, the law. We also realirt'that.if he be allowed freely to .vote, and to have his vote honestly counted and returned, we, the white people of Sonth Carolina, will be in a minority; we must submit to that or quit the State, and, in all reverence, we swear that we will never quit the State." Tbis is substantially saying thai. the hite people of Sonth Carolina do not intend to permit an honest election In that State. Could there be any stronger or more forcible reason given for the.enactment of this law? People Shonld Not ba Snappy^* Riding in the street oar the other day I saw an amusing scene.  An elderly lady asked the condnotor for a, transfer obeok. "Where do you wish to go?" he inquired. 'That's none of your business, sir," was ber indiguant answer. Tbe conductor quietly pnnobed a oheck for Chelsea, and, taking her 8 cants, passed along.  Soon he came through the car again, and tbe elderly lady, who bad been studying the check intently, palled his sleeve and asked: "Conductor, where will this take me?" His reply was prompt and justifiable. "That, madam, is my business."-Boston Olobe. Prostrated by Lightning;. During the storm on Tuesday night a Miss Garduer, residing on Jay street, near Church, was strangely efiected by the lightning. The lady was prostrated and for a few moments partly paralysed. Tho house was not struck and none of the other inmates were similarly affected. She soon recovered and is none the worse for her fright.   

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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