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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: May 19, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - May 19, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YE AU-NO. (58. LOCK HAVEN, PA., MONDAY. MAY 19. 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS EVENING EXPRESS KINSIiOE BROTHERS---PtJBMSHKBS CURRENT COMMENT. Senator Qcat is reported by the Philadelphia Press as saying that Dela-mater and Pattison will be the successful candidates for Governor on the Republican and^Democratic tickets. It seems to be U>e fashion for one who wishes some publie office to get an organ of his own. It is, therefore, not so very unlikely that ex-Senator Wallace may buy the Daily Herald, of Philadelphia, in order that his. claims for the Governship may be duly recognized. Englishmen, almost to a man are against the HoKinley bill. So are free traders in the United States. Unfortunately for the English manufacturer, it is an Amerioan Congress that is legislating on the tariff, and Congress is in the hands of the Republicans, the party of protection. The Republicans in Congress are accused of cutting down appropriations and saving the surplus to promote great objects-such as the development of com merce, pay to the soldier the debt of gratitude the country owes him, and so on. If the Democrats can stand opposing such objects, we think the Republicans can. George M. Pullman has made the Chicago Pair people a most muoicinent offer. He will give them the nse of three hundred acres of land for a site, give a million dollars as a gift and purchase the buildings after the fair is over. The only difficulty in the way is that his grounds are too far from the city. When Btilson Hutchins last sold the Washington Poet, thinking as before, it is probsble, it would come back to him with a good thing made "by the operation, be misjudged. The Post in present hands is a success and the sale perpetual. Convinced of this Mr. Hutchins has purchased the Washington Critic, and associated himself with others to make it a Democratic paper of the genus organ. The Democratic cauous of the Kentucky Legislature has unanimously chosen Hon. John Griffin Carlisle as their candidate for the United States Senate. This insures his election, of course. The action of the caucus was about the best thing it could do. Mr. Carlisle has made a National reputation by dint of ability and attention to his duties in the lower House. HiB tariff views are objectionable, but so are those of every Kentucky Democrat. ComtAXDEB McCalla, late commander of the United States war steamer Enterprise, whose trial attracted so much attention tho whole country over, has been found gnilty of the charges for which he was tried and sentenced to be snspended from rank and duty for a period of three years, and to retain his present number on the list of commanders while bo suspended. The trial proved him to have violated the navy regulations in inflicting improper punishments on his men.  He deserved all he got._ X�*�Ui ot Mn. v,T?d�!i. A telegram was received in this oity this afternoon announcing the death of Mrs. Sarah J. Cryder, wife of Mr. John 11. Cryder, at Cameron, Pa. Mrs, Cryder has never been well since having a Bevere attack of la grippe some months ago, and moved from this city a short time ago with the hopes of regaining her shattered health The remains will doubtless be brought to this city for interment. The dress-making rooms of Miss Mattie Summerson, a daughter of the deceased, will be closed until after the tuneral. FBBSONAL   PESCIL1NQ8. Olair K. MoCloskey spent Sunday with friends in Wl\U*m�port. Ex-Deputy Sheriff James A. WenBOl spent Sunday at Beech Creek. C. C. bohaefSe returned this morning from a weeks visit at Lewisburg. ' William Baldwin and Thomas E. Baldwin, natives of Canada, were granted naturalization papers by the court this forenoon, Jacob Gephart and his son William, a compositor in the Democrat office, will leave to-morrow lor a brief visit to Buffalo, N. Y. Prof. James Eldon will be one of the examining Board at Edinboro Normal School examinations, which begins on tho 3d of J une. Dr. D. J. Waller, Btate Superintendent of Public Instruction, will deliver the lecture to the graduating class of the Uelle-fonte High School. The commencement will be held May ZOtb. Mr. John L. Marsh, of Pittsburgh, spent Saturday and Sunday with relatives in this oity. Ho now holds a responsible position with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in that city. Mrs. H. L. Gould is slowly recovering from her severe illness, which will be pleasant news for tho lady's many friends in this oity. She is not yet able to leave her room but expects to do so within the next few days, if steady improvement eon leues. BIli RUMPUS IN THE HOUSE. A Scene of Confusion Seldom Paralleled in Its History. UPBOAB AND CONTUSION REIGNS Representative Bynum, or Indiana, Precipitates the Disorder b>j Accdmuod and Language Grossly Unparliamentary- Hie Democratic Colleagues Endorse the Disgraceful Actlofi- Washisotox, May 18.-The scenes in the House of Kepresenatives yesterday were almost without parallel. Mr. Bayne and Mr. Bynnm wero the leading spirits, and the Indianian was very bitter in his denunciation of the man from Pennsylvania. The sceue occurred after debate on the Tariff bill had boon going on for some time, and was precipitated by Mr. Bayne insisting on reading a letter from Mr. James Campbell, of Pittsburg, deuyiog the statements made in the recent debate on glassware and Y&mp oMmneya. After half au hour of uproar, Mr. Bynum secured the floor amid comparative quiet, and said that the Campbell affidavit was to the effect that Mr. Wilson and he had said that S15 a month was enough for any glass-blower. In his district, where he was known, the affidavit had not been circulated; but in Mr. Wilson's district. He had telegraphed to the West Virginia papers denouncing Campbell as a liar and perjurer. Since the gentleman fiom Pennsylvania constituted himself the sewer through which this attack of Campbell made its way into the Record- Mr. Cheadle, of Indiana, made the point of order that the language was out of order. The chair thought that the word -'sewer" in this connection was hardly parliamentary. tbe TUnriVJLEKCE INCREASES. Mr.- Bynom-I withdraw it then and say "conduit pipe." Since tho gentleman from Pennsylvania is the medium through which the statement of Campbell found its way into the Record; since the Chair has said that the way a citizen, who may feel aggrieved, can get into the Record, is by the endorsement of a motuber of the House I have simply to say that I did the other day, knowing full well tho meaning of the words, and that I was responsible for them, denounce Mr. Campbell as a liar and a perjurer. I want to say now that I accept and am willing to believe that I have as great confidence in the oharacter of Mr. Campbell as I have in the character of the gentleman who makes this attack upon me. [Excitement and uproar.] Mr. Cutcheon demanded that the words be taken down, while Mr. Morgan (Miss.) stood in front of the Chairman's desk and appealed that both the letter and the speech be stricken from the Record. He feared that they might lead to trouble outside of the House. The offensive words were taken down and reported from tho Clerk's desk. Mr. Cutcheon moved that the committee rise and report the words to the House for its action. This was agreed to-yeas, 120; nays, 99-and as Mr. Bayne rose to vote for the motion he was greeted with jeering cries of-"Bayne '. Bayne! Bayno'." from the Democratic aide. The words having been reported to the House, Mr. Brcckendidge (Ky.) made the point of order that there was nothing in tho report of tho committee to show that there had been no intervening business before their uttcranco and tho roport to the House. a resolution Ob- cexsuiik. The Speaker overruled tho point of order on the ground that he must be governed by the report mafia to Iritn \>y ttie man of the committee, and that he most assume that the committee acted accord ing to rules. Mr. Breckenridge appealed from the decision. On motion of Mr- Struble, (Iowa), the appeal was laid on the table-yeas, 12G: nays, 101. Mr. Briggs (California,) asked that the recapitulation of the names be dispensed with, but Mr. Breckinridge objected, suggesting that the members of the House should have time to cool down. Mr. Cutcheon then offered the following: Resolved, That the member from In-Qiana (Hr. William D. Bynum), in \be language need by him in Committee of the Whole, abd taken down and reported to the House and read at the Clerk's desk, has been guilty of a violation of the rules and privileges of the House for the same. Resolved, That the said William D. Byuum be now brought to tho bar of tho House by the Sergeant-at-Arros and thero the ceusure of the House be administered by the Speaker, After a long -wrangle and numerous disgraceful interruptions from the Democratic Bide, the motion was carried by a vote 125 to 10:i. the gentleman censltied. Then Mr. Bynum, leaning on  tho arm of Mr. Holtnan. of Indiana, appeared at [ the bar, accompanied by r'l of his Demo- cratic associates who could find room in the. limited space, and who were loud in their applause. The Speaker obtained order and requested the gentlemen to take their seats. Mr. Springer, acting as spokesmen for his party, declined to do so. Sergeant-at-Arras Holmes then said: "Mr. Bynum, by resolution of the House of Representatives' you are required to appear before the bar of the House to receive the censure of that body through its Speaker. The Speaker again requested members to take their seats, and tbe Democrats again refused to comply. The Speaker then said calmly: "Tbe House ol Representatives perceives that is impassible for the Chair to enforce order u account of th e notion of certain m embers. The Chair trill, therefore, proceed to do its duty under tbe present condition of disorder. "Mr. William D. Bynum, you are arraigned at the bar of tbe House for having transgressd its rules by your remarks. For this offonse the House desires that you should bo, censured at its bar. In the name of the House, therefore, I pronounce upon you its censure. Tbe Sergeant-at-Arms will now release you." Mr. Byuum-Under such circumstances I accept the censure of the House as a decoration of honor. [Democratic applause. ] There was some disposition manifested by the Republican* to take umbrage at this remark; but before it was understood perfectly the House, at 10:30, adjourned. Thus ended one of the most exciting incidents of the session. A Rich Be etood for Mnt time wateMag and listening to the wonderful machine1. After a short time entered into an earnest conversation with thejinan nrho was operating, the: instrument. At first the operator, won;' a mystuSed look.bnt that gradually melted .into, an amused smile as the conversation went on. Finely he seemingly consented to the yguiig,m�n!< wishes and they both went olosertotl^e phonograph. The visitor looked neCTOjuij around, but as there was no one near babe began talking into the machine, ile said only a few words, and. then,turning to the operator, he said, eajmestiy: 'r, "Remember; to-morrow."......, ,..,   , . The man smiled again and nodded hi* head. .The next day at about the aame hour the nervous visitor of .the day before appeared at the place again, bat this tints he waa not alone. Accompanying him was a pretty young woman, about nineteen years old. The yonng man was more net. vous than ever, and while the couple wren looking about tbe plane and examining the different articles of interest the yonng woman noticed the young man'* uWaaiaea* and spoke to him several times about it. He passed tbe matter over lightly, though rather awkwardly, and assured her that there was nothing the matter . with hi'n She plainly saw that something was wrong and suggested that they should go out of the place. At this suggestion he earnestly almost with desperation, protested,. and insisted that they must not go until, they had heard the phonegxapb... She consented, and they went near it. As. they approached, the operator gave the. young man a smile of approval. Tbe yoang nan drew hi* companion close to the .instrument, all the time growing - more .nervous than ever, and all the time gUnoingajosnd looking for a convenient and safe retreat. Tbe strains of a lively waltz began, to flow from the insttument, then suddenly,.the musio ceased and after a second'* pans* the yonng woman heard the voice of beg oompanion addressing ber.. The word* that she heard were so unexpected that she glanced, qrj&Uj g& trim faeaiw^thVa lip* were tigbtly olosed, and he waa looking straight at the roachine. Her look followed his,. and this is what aha heard coming from the phonograph: "Mazie, I have loved yon for a long time, but have never dared to tell you aos will.you be my wife?" .-..,�,..� The operator watched tbe pair out of the oorner of his'eye, an amused smile playing about hi* mouth in the meantime. When the sentence was completed be diaoreeUy started tbe machine to singing "Down Went McGinty to the Bottom of the gee? Tbe yonng woman remained ailent (or* moment, looking straight ahead,, then turned toward her oompanion. Tbera-we* no mistaking that look. lie appeared to be choking, bo red was his face.. She blushed violently, and touching bin on the arm, while her face was turned froa* him, she said in voice not stall steady: "Came, let us go." ��" A* they disappeared through the door the operator, laughed quietly: to bitnetf and muttered:     . .......   .. ,. .< "Variety is the spice of life, sure." - A few days afterward tbe young man appeared again, and this time hi* faoo was wreathed in (miles a* be approached the phonograph man. He shook him heartily by the hand and said: "She called me a coward, but I don't care. It's all right now. Marry thanks,'' Clean Vr. But one week remains io whioh to put the streets of tin city to good condition, tor tbe conclave. Much ha* been dorsa, bat there i* considerable work that remain* unfinished and in many places, especially along tbe route over which th* parade will pass. It is also a f aet that at many poiuta tbe work of cleaning ap'ba* not began. This onght to be, and no doubt will be, a busy week in Look Haven if the weather permits. Everybody feels that a abaie of the work of putting the city in It* best possible condition rests upon them Individ-, aally. Tbe crowds of visitor* in the city next week must not return to their homes under, the impression that this city IA unclean or its people untidy. Marks of the flood have disappeared rapidly this spring and with the weather favorable for outdoor work during this week and a. general determination on the part of all to make the town as nearly what it was before the flood as possible, wonders will be accomplished. -. A Heavy Kala. -, A heavy rain storm passed over-this oity last night accompanied with thunder and lightning. The ram was the heaviest of the season, and while the downpour lasted reminded Look Haven people of the rain that caused thedeluge last vear.   

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