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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: May 17, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - May 17, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                NINTH YEAK-NO. 67 LOCK HAVEN, PA., SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1890. PRICE-TWO CEKTS EVENING EXPKESS KINSLOK BROTHERS---PUBLISHERS CURRENT COMMENT. Gibard College has now on its rolls of (students the namos of 1,543 orphan boys, who are well oared for and educated so that they may be fitted for business work on their graduation. If you don't like tbe weather we are haviug, move out to North Dakota. They had a niue-incb snowfall there this week, and there is some fine Bleighiui! theie now. It's a great country. Isn't it? By a. vote of 32 to 7 New Jersey has p.iss?d a marriage license bill, which requires candidates for matrimony to pro-ouro a license. That will kill Camden's marriage traffic as dead as Julius Cffisar. Madame Diss de Bar, the notorious spiritualistic swindler, is in jul at Rome. The "affinity" whom she has duped this time is a hotel-keeper whoso cupboard and wine cellar paid tiibute to her geniuB. Under all climes she is the same Diss de Bar. City Chamberlain Chain, of New York, complained that $2,000,000 of tbe sinking fund was in the banks drawing 2J per cent, interest, while the city borrowed from tbe same banks at 4 per cent, interest. This is a queer financiering and not nnnBual in New York. BROUGHT TO THE SURFACE, The Dead Bodies of Nineteen of tbe Entombed at Ashley, Eecovered, AWTUL SCENES AT THE PITS MOUTH. The Stone men and the Del a mater men in the oil regions have battled with one another in tbe liveliest fashion ever known in that part of the State. Each aide haa something to rejoice over, and oaoh is in a much better humor ovar the result than was at first expected either of them wou'd be. The foot that Senator Wade Hampton has written a public letter calltug on the leading Democrats of South Carolina to bold a conference to deWsft means for tha defeat of tboFarmcrV Association of the State, which has bolted the regular Democratic coarse, in proof positive that the Bourbons are terribly worried over the new independent movement. Maryland has discovered to her sorrow, aa well as to her pecuniary loss, th at she has no law that will punish her State Treasurer for Btealing $132,000 of public securities. If such is the case, Maryland ought to throw up her present constitu tion, go back to her provincial condition and make a fresh start into Statehood. It is a poor sort of a law that provives no punishment for such a crime as this. A syndicate of wealthy French Jews has offered $200,000 for the Hebrew Book in the Vatican. For this book, generally conceded to be the most valuable in the world, the Hebrews of Europe have more than once made offers in the century past, one of the offers being its weight in gold for the famous Bible; but it is understood that the Pope cannot legally sell it without the authority of tbe Congregation of tbe Propaganda. A Showman Injured. Robert Bell, one of the men with Mc-Clellans's show, was injured this morning by one of the tent poles falling upon him. Dr. G. C. Burnley was called to attend the injured man and /mind him suffering considerably from a contusion of one of the ankles. The doctor however found that no bones were broken and the showman will be able for duty again in a few days. Works tike a Ctiarut. The boom which the bridge builders hung yesterday in the river above the dam works like a charm. All the logs are now sent to tbe Lockport side of the river, and gives the bridge men no trouble. fcC N PAY  8EKVICK9. Services in Great Island Presbyterian Church at the usual hours, both morning and evening. At the Bvangelioal Church, preaching at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Sunday �chool at 9:30 a. m. and class meeting at 6:30 p. m. At the Baptist Church, services conducted by the pastor in tbe morning at 10:30 and in the evening at 7:30. Sunday sohool at 2:15. Tbe usual services at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. in the English Lutheran Church. Sunday school at 2 o'clock and Young Peoples prayer meeting at G:30 p. ro. Services iu the Reformed Church conducted by the pastor at the usual hours both morning and opening. An orchestra will assist in the Sunday school at 0:30 a. is. At Trinity M. E. Church, quarterly meeting service. Love feast at 0 a. m. Communion at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. ro. Suoday school at 2 o'clock. Young Peoples Alliance at 0:30 p. ra. At East Main Street M. E. Church-Sunday school at 0 o'clock. Preaching and sacrament of the Lord's supper at 10:30. by Kev. W. A, Stephens, Presiding Elder of this district. Love feast at 3 p. m. and prayer meeting at 7:30. Preaching at Fleming too at 7:30, by Rev. W. A. Stephens. The Heroic Work of tlieReectiine Patty Who Ke ached the Bodies lathe Face of Great Peril-Paining on Through Deadly Gtm Until a Veritable Chamber of Horrors Was Reached. WxL'KEeBARRK, May 16.-Through the daring efforts of Mine Inspector Williams the terrible fate of tbe imprisoned Ashley miners was learned this morning. After numerous attempts to enter tlio mine through a newly made opening the officials concluded that the air currents must be changed, and left with their workmen for this purpose. Being a matter requiring considerable time, Inspector Williams became impatient ol the delay and with Abednigo Ruese, of Wanticoke, made another attempt to penetrate the workings. Gab abounded despite the strong air current drawing through the gangway, and their safety lampB glared and flickered in a manner telling of fearful danger. They persisted in their attemps, however, and followed the gangway 200 feet. Waiting but a moment for the air to clear, they advanced down the steep incline of nearly 60 degrees, 300 feet further, when gas became so plentiful that they again paused. Finally, advancing 500 feet through the main gangway, they came to a large chamber which proved a veb1taele chamber of hokxior9, By the faint glow of their safety lamps the two men discovered on every side of them corpses blackened, burned and mangled. The mine inspector stooping, with his lamp, examiued and counted the bodies, 19 in all. Here lay a man with his head missing, there a boy stripped entirely of evey shred of clothing and covered with wounds, another lay near by with one arm and one foot blown off. Dead bodies of mules lay crushed to a jelly by the mine cars, which were scattered about in splinters. Pausing but long enough to ascertain tbe number of dead, the two men hurried back to the open air and summoned help. Stretchers and sheets woro brought, ropes provided, and a rude sled built to draw the corpses up the steep incline. Soon tbe work of removing the dead bodies was underway and TERRIBLE fcCEKES  WEllE witnessed As they were brought to the surface. As soon as the company learned that the bodies were being removed orders were given that all should betaken to an undertaking establishment and made as presentable as possible. They were then later in the afternoon removed to their homes and the company will see to their proper burial cause of the cave IS. The cause of ihccavo-in is believed to be tbe exeeBsive amount of coal removed, not sufficient being left to cairy the superincumbent rock. Frequent comment is made on the fact that the explosion which followed, like many others of recent occurrence, is due to carelessness on thd uart of a subordinate mine official, in this case a fire bors. Though tbey are employed because of their courteousncss and experience they have been tbe very ones to imperil their own lives and those of others by acts of marked fool hard in ess. Only a week ago two fire bosses were convicted of criminal carelessness and were fined by the court $50 each. Another is now awaiting trial, while several others have lost their lives aloDg with their fellow workmen. Among the houses damaged art) thoso of E. J. Campbell, Frank Pacalko?, Joseph Margot, Mrs. Anthony McCormack, James Fredinnick and John Rutz, the houses of Mr. Rutz and Mr. Campbell being very b^dJy wreoked. Workmen were engaged all night long filling the fissures in tbe road with dirt and stone. a thrill wto experience. Among the many thrilling experiences incident to the awlul disaster, that of James Sullivan will long be remembered. Sullivan was standing on the gangway beside his little doortender, a Polish boy named Joe Bobroeki; with them, but a short distance behind, was Michael Henry, one of tbe miners. When the shock came ft almoHt lifted Sullivan off his feet. With rare presence of mind, however, ho gsab-bed tbe doortender in his arms and ran for his life. After he had gone a short diBtanco he heard a crash, and looking over his shoulder saw Henry fall. It is supposed that he was caught by the falling roof and buried alive. six others ik the chamber. At 8 o'clock ibis evening all operations at tbe mines were cbandooed. Tbcro are , yet six men in the fatal chamber. They are Michael and John �5cally, brothers, Robert Richards, Michael Henry, Richard Jones and Joshua Williams. At ti o'clock to-morrow morning operations will he resumed and the work of rescue pushed forward without intermission until the re- maining bodies have been recovered. Six mules were taken out alive late this afternoon. The bodies of five Polauders were buried this afternoon, no oue having appeared to claim them. AT THE NORMAL LAST NIGHT. Yen, We Meet Them Often. Philadelphia Star. Have you never met the man who doesn't care a blank tor what the newspaper may say of him, good, bad or indifferent? If you have met him, and the meeting chances to have been when the paper of tbe day has made severe mentiou of him yon need not be told that he is the maddest man out of a lunatic asylum. HiB oontempt for newspaper is expressed ju vehement malediotions and vows of veo-geance on the head of tbe editor. Fog' sibly yon have met him when something plesant has been said of him in tbe newspaper. He doesn't care for sncb things, not he; but notwithstanding this indifference, you have observed, no doubt, that he reads the lauding paragraph over and over, and audibly wonders bow the duce those newspaper fallows manage to get hold of so many facts, and how they bap-pen to know so much about him. He is pleasant all over, and gives such outward expressions to his satisfaction that no one would ever imagine that he is one of the kind that dont cars a continental blank for what the newspaper say. Interesting Proceedings of the Price and Shakespeare Literary Societies. The Circus. McClellan's shows arrived from Renovo at an early hour this morning, and pitohed their tents on the grounds near the freight depot. The bUow brought * number of people to towu and Main street was lined all morning with men, women and child-run, waiting for tbe parade. A large crowd was attraoted to tbe grounds this afternoon and tbe performance would have been well attended but shortly before the time for opening tbe doors for tbe afternoon show, a heavy gale of wind struck the tent. The centre polo snapped off about eight feet from the top and the tent fell. It was fortunate that the acci dent occurred before the tent was filled with people. Mr. McCSeilan stated that repairs would be made in time to give an afternoon performance and also show again thiB evening. Two From Kenovo. From the News. The log drive of Messrs. Emery, Smith & Fish, on Kettle Creek, succeeded in getting into the river yesterday. They have one hundred and fifty men and twenty teams at work. There is a fair flood in tbe river. George W. Rhoe, the ool lector of the Lock Haven Democrat, has been in Renovo this week on business. George is a valuable adjunct to the repotorial force of our Democratic contemporary also, and is a gentleman who is highly popular throughout the county, wherever his genial countenance Is over. "Tired All the Time," Say many poor men and women, who seem overworked, or are debilitated by change of season, climate or life. If yon could read tbe hundreds of letters praising llood'B Sarsaparilla which come from people whom it has restored to health, you would be convinced of its merits. As this is impossible, why not try Hood's Sarsaparilla yourself and thus realize its benefit? It will tone and build up your uystem, give you a good appetite, overcome that tired feeling and make you feel, its one woman expresses it, "like a new creature." A Bridge Across tbe Hudson. The Senate Committee on Commerce on Wednesday ordered a favorable report upon the bill to incorporate an organization to build a bridge over tbe Hudson river between Jereoy City and New York. The plan of the bridge is that submitted by Gustavo Lindentbal, which will cost about $40,000,000 to complete. A minority of the committee report against the bill, on the ground that Congress huB not tbe right to charter an organization for that purpose. School Days Over. The Fourth Ward schools closed yesterday with appropriate exercises, consisting of songs, drills, recitations, dialogues and readings. Quite a number of the patrons were present and seemed to be well entertained. The work done by the Fourth Ward schools Is highly satisfactory, notwithstanding the disadvantages they were laboring under. Natural Gee In Mew York. Natural gas was struck in great quantities at Pulaski, N. Y., on Tuesday. Six hundred feet of iron piping was blown out of the well and the derrick and maohinery destroyed. The noise of esoaping gas woke up all the villagors at midnight. Salt water was spouted out of the well to a great height. A Word of Caution. RcsidentBof CaBtacea complain of young men and boys who play ball in that place on Sunday, and wish through the columns of the Express to caution thoso who engage in such Sunday sports not to repeat them. Arrests will follow Is ball if played in Castanea to-morrow. THE NEW HALLS FORMERLY OPENED. All the Participants Acquit Themselves With Crodlt-The Many Visitors and Student! Greatly Pleased and Hlshly Kntertelued-The Circus-It AVorks Like a Charm. Last evening the Price Society met in their hall, especially set apart for their use, in the new Normal. The following order o( exorcises was given to a large and appreciative audience of students and town's folk. The meeting wis called to order by President Hess, and the minutes of tbe preceding meeting wero read and approved. Then followed the calling of the roll of tbe members of tbe Sooiety, which was well responded to, showing a large membership. The newly elected President, Mr. G. W. Brown, then delivered his inaugural address, in which be referred to the many difficulties with which the Sooiety has had to contend, and concluded his remarks by calling attention to the unusual prosperous condition of the Sooiety. The officers elect then took their chairs with the exception of Critic, in whose absence tbe President appointed Mr. Ma-Daniel. Tbe first performance on the program was select reading by Miss Cameron, followed by a recitation by Miss Emma Brower. 'Good Evening" was then sang by a quartette-Misses Hann i and Musser, and Messrs. Snyder and Grenninger. Miss Roxa Stewart then read an essay, after which W. H. Stanley, a graduate of the class of '86, recited "Over the Hill to tbe Poor House." Miss Musser and Mr. Grenninger then sang a duet, whioh was followed by select reading by Miss Houghton. Tbe most interesting feature of tbe evening was the regular debate, whioh followed tbe reading by Miss Houghton. The question for discussion was: Resolved, "That the civil war has brought more good to the United Si ites than tbe Revolutionary war." The affirmative was ably defended by Mr. D. E. Mnrray, the negative by J. W. Gepheardt. The judges appointed were Messrs. Webber, Carter and Rinehart. It was a very spirited argument, and both speakers did themselves much oredit. The judges decided tbe argument for tbe negative. In general debate the speakers wont at it again and tbe bouse voted for the negative. The glee club then rendered a selection after which the Price Gazelle was read by Miss Delia Heok. The lady is to be complimented on her editorial ability. Tbe paper was interspersed with wit, humor and pathos. The Sentiment Roll was called and well responded to, after which the Critic made some remarks oj the performance of the evening. We were glad to see so many of the oity people in attendance, and extend an invitation to our meeting next Friday evening, or at any time it is convenient for them to visit us. p. i>. 8. b. the shakespeare society. The program of the Shakespeare Sooiety as carried out in their new ball at the Normal, last night, was a most interesting one. President Clymer called the meeting to order ht 8 o'clock, and in a few appropriate remarks opened the dedicatory services. After singing the long metre daxology, prayer by Dr. Nesbitt, and a sacred quartet, the regular program was begun. Recitations wero given by Misses Brosious, Bacon and Hatnill; a declamation by Mr. Wilson, and an esBay by Miss Spears. All these deserve oommendation as most of tbe performers appeared for the first time. The debate on tbe question, Resolved, 'That the V. S. Senators should be elected by tbe poople," wab nicely bandied by Messrs. C. M. Rosenbery, J. Marshall and T. Kuoebel on tbe affirmative, and Messrs. W. D. Hunk, W. F. Herr and J. B. Southard on the negative. This was ths first attempt of these members, also. The 'Avon Gazette," edited by Miss Greene, was read by Mr. Horner on account of the editor's illness. About the middle of tbe program .the audience was treated to a farce, by thirteen of the members. It was called "Realistic Readers," and they made their pieces so very realistic by means of dinner bells, ahaina, sword, li ig, etc., as to be laughably ridiculous. Tbe music throughout tbo program was of tbe hiabest order and reflects muob credit on the chorister, Miss Blesh. The society has reason to be proud of its first meeting in its new quarters, and may certainly hope for success hereafter. The room was orowded with friends from the city, all of whom seemed well pleased with the oxoroises. We hope tbo attendance will be as good hereafter. Congratulations, Shakespeare I % PUNGENT POT POtJItBI. A Hlsefllaneuns Mixture of Sense and Nonsense Scissored and Scribbled. With nil her raise I love her still; No other girl like her can thrill My faeart unto Its Inmost core, ITor sbe bas "money and golden store." Bhe weara store teeth and false hair, too. And etlll I woo and woo and woo, For her sweet "snug" my parse would fill; With all her raise 1 love bar still. A Baltimore clergyman preached on the subjeot: "Wby was Lszzarus a beggar?'" Perhaps Liz-rus didn't advertise. Purk chops are more esthetic with tomato catchup. Whenever, during tbe next six months the milkman, the grocer, the butcher, the iceman, tbe fisbman, the fruiterer, or, in fact, any tradesman, takes it into bis head to raise prices on his-customers, be will blandly deolaro that the bigb price of ice compels him to this coarse. "Good, sound horse sense" is a common expression; bat horses often show the lack of it as well as men. The Chicago later-Ocean says that tbe horse tbat is taking his noon feed from his nose bag, and is so fearlul tbat a brother horse is going to get a bite of bis dinner that he lays bis ears bank, and cavorts around, and scatters bis oats on the ground, very much resembles a class of men who know nothing of the maxim of "live and let live." The man or the horse who eata from bis own nose bag and let* all others do tbe same in their own way, is likely to get the moat feed and be tbe happiest. A enp of rock-salt in the tab makes a refreshing bath. Grotesque new stockings have black tops and poppy-red feet. Impossible blue roses deck tbe iosteps of certain new stockings. Some epicures say tbe brain of the snipe is tbe tastiest part of the bird. After all, nothing so enhances a pleasing foot as plain black hosiery. I've called my candy pig MoGiaty, mamma," said young hopeful. "If I lick him be will go down, won't be?" A dullard says "many an editor bas been ruined by trying to be smart." He's right. But no editor was ever rained by being smart. Customer-Don't you oall that a dul razor? Barber-It can't be berry dull, sad. I cut frew a man's coat, vest and Bbirt with it last night. It is no sign that a river is in poor health when it cannot leave its bed. Tbongh some of our colleges are very old tbey are still in possession of their faculties. A Successful Strike. The busy little town of Farrandsville was the scene of a strike this week, which began with the moulders, pressors and otber men employed In tbe fire brick works and extended until upwards of one hundred and fifty men in the employ of Messers. Fredericks, Monro & Co. were involved and the business of manufacturing and shipping fire brick was paralyzed. About sixty men are employed in the brick yard as moulders, pressors and general laborers, and tbe demand made by the men was for eight hours instead of ten for a day's labor. The demand was not aoceded to by tbe fiim and as a result all the men employed in the manufacture of fire brick at that place quit their work and refused to labor nntil the strikers' troubles were satisfactorily adjusted. The matter was finally arranged by tbe firm giving the strikers an increase in wages of from 8 to 10 per cent, and all hands resumed their work. Nearly Xirowned. Yesterday afternoon two little children of Mr. George Tarman, who resides in Upper Lockport, were playing on a timber raft when the youngest, a little boy of six years, fell into the river. The little girl, a^ed eight years caught hold of her little brothel and succeeded in pulling him out of the water in a half drowned condition. THE LATEST 67 TELEGRAPH Five Men Buried by the Undermining of a Vast Culm Bank at 8cranton. THREE OF THEM DUG OUT L1TELE8S A Renovo Cbnrch Fair Attraction. Yesterday the Renovo Neat stated that one of the attractions at the Catholic Fair last night would be a sparring match. The contestants it was stated were well known among the sparring fraternity of Pennsylvania. Inspection To-Night. Major Wright, the Third Brigade Inspector, will be bore this evening to inspect Company H. Colonel Coryell is also expected to be present at the inspection whioh will take place at tbe Armory. W. c. T. V. Special Meeting. There will be a special business meeting of tbe VS. O. T. U., in the rooms over Hilton's drug store, on Monday afternoon at 3 o'clook, which all christian women are requested to attend. Board of Trade AfetUnff. The regular monthly meeting of the Lock Haven Board of Trade will be held Monday evening, 19th inst., at 8 o'olook. All members are urged to be present. The Accident Creates Wild Excitement-All tha Victims Itallaa Railroad Laborer* Who Are Known by Xnmben-Excellent Management on the Part oftha Resteers Enable Them to Save Two. Scbahtos, May IP- -This afternoon by the caving in of a vast quantity of oulm which had been undermined by a force of laborors at Olypbant, seven miles from this oity, five Italian laborers were buried underneath many tons of stuff. Tbe men were employed npon an Ontario, Carbon-dale and Scranton construction train, and were removing the oulm from the aide of tbe pile for ballast. When. the slide commenced, It was seen by the foreman,.who yelled at tbe top of his voice, and a number of trainmen essaped in time. Intense exoitetnent soon prevailed in the town, tbe report having gone ont that thirty-five men had been buried beneath tbe hnge mass. Tbe laborers on the ground, reinforced by about sixty additional men, summoned from another point were soon engaged in the work of removing the calm, with tbe hops of resoaing their five fellow workmen. They quiokly reached two of the buried men, who were found to be alive, but badly injured. It took nearly half an hour to reach, the other three, and all were found lifeless/ It was feared that thero were other men buried, bnt at 8 o'olook to-night, the officials of tbe company dispelled all fears,' saying every man had been accounted for. Tbe Italian laborers were known by numbers, hence tbe names of the victims cannot now be ascertained. ' --� -.-..i-.... !. '^5a,.~.. HAl-IC OPKNIKO HVJMOaM. The High School Commencement. Next Friday night the Fifteenth Annual Commencement of tbe Lock Haven High Sohool will be held in the Opera House. The examinations have all been passed successfully by tbe members of tbe gradu-ting class and tbe majority of tbe young ladies and gentlemen graduate with an average above ninety. The lowest average made by any one of the class iaeighty. seven. The olasu is composed of ton yonng ladies aud eight young men whose names are as follows: George Prendible, Minnie Wiedhahn, Charles Webb, Helen Lane, J. G ratios Fetriken, Nellie Novell, Warden McLees, Annie Emery, Drew Grafius, Mace Datesman, Edward Bower, Emma Ryan, Burr Lyon, Agnes Doran, Edward Shartleff, Eleanor Kress, Helen Lesber, Nellie Myers. The first honors was won by Hiss Helen Lesber, the next highest by George Pren dible and tbe third honors by Miss Agnes Doran. The program for the Commencement' exercises will be interesting and entertaining. The Health Board's Meeting*. At tbe regular meeting of the Board of Health last night H. T. Jarrett was appointed to fill tbe -vaoaney in the Board caused by the death of the late J. H. L�v-erty. A number of nuisances were reported and steps taken for their abatement. Tbe question of pig pens within the oity limits was discussed and the conclusion arrived at was that pig pens must go. This action on the part of the Health Board will meet tbe approval of the people generally. Lock Haven is not a village. A Show Day Accident. Georgie Draucker, a little son of William Draucker, of tbe St. Charles Hotel, was ran over by a team in the streets this forenoon. The little fellow received slight injuries. PERSONAL   FENCLLIHQ8. Prof. C. F. Reeves, of Penn'a State College, spread bis napkin at tbe Irvin House to-day. Fred. Bickford has been confined to tbe house by illness for several days, bat is out again to-day. Mrs. Annie Dunn and daughter were among the passengers arriving oo Erie mail from the East this morning. Mrs. E. O. Aldrioh, of Instanter, arrived in tbe city last night and will remain until after tbe Knights Templar conclave. Thomas Sberlook, one of Uucle Sam's letter carriers in this oity, is enjoying a brief vacation with relatives and friends at Altoona. ' Adam Reed, a telegraph operator in the office of tbe Superintendent of the P. & E. Railroad at Williamsport, spent last night with his Lock Haven friends. Elmer S. Brown, the Williamsport Sun says, has taken the entire charge of the lumber yard of A. Pardee & Co., at Mon-toursville. Mr. Browu will remove his family to that plaoe. Frank Musser, of State College, one of Centre county's ball enthusiasts left this week for Look Haven, where he will distinguished himself on the diamond this summer.-Bellefonto Oaiettt. Some Incidents Showing How Great Troubles Arise from X.1H1* Causes. From theBoatoa Courier.     yl'^R "There are many amnarog'liibjetfnts connected with our business," said a safe manufsotorer one day.  "It is to be expected that in the ordinary cx)njs�>olssTenU circumstances will'arise- when a safe wil have to be opened by an ,expert, ^ Looks, like any other piece ofmeeheuWm, are no infallible. The best of them are liable to fail at times through some slight defect in manufacturing, same as the mainspring of the most valuable watch rh'sygrVe out un expeetedry.    -  -' '-xvn-.'.v.'j "Not long ago a rWvratttMw-nran to fix'their safe, it -was bp*, -%ntfthey could not abut tbe oVwr'^irr^oSongb to throw the bdlti." The' i�"�#llwfei.!-t� ths place, and after a biief etimlntfletiaaw a penny reStine on one of (be-bot�rin  an* supposed to occupy h�bfflc��Ie*r, a*'oegged that it should be kept q%Jst?lJ ^ ' "SomeyearBat^wshadderrvevlsa-anew set of vault doors1 for a-ban* -a�o� two hundred miles away;" Jurt'iteTolSo'they wore ready to ocon>y: tberfmeV^^siarters we had a telegram to rtndamMWonce. The bolta of -the outer door wotlM not throw far etkragh tb; lo�k: iti^-O** man went, ana tbki'B'�Uat'ib�'^os1a4i" The bank officers bad fitted-' In aVboatoVftr tbe tread of tbe vestibule, but MatTonJitted to bore holes in it to allow foV'ttetlMOw of the bolts; An angur and tent ^minutes' labor made everything all right, bnt made that piece of board a> ratberextfavagant luxury: -U.tr tu.w "Epicurean-like, we navwreewTsrl the best for tbe last.-^or fear tUs may'leaoh the eyes of the hero'of' tbe^ueldeaVl will substitute for 'bis Mireot address that of Calais, Me. It was not a tbdasBndviilee from there. The letter read to come at once and open a safe, aa there wars important documents wanted for immediate use. With his kit of tools,, our -meni took the next train and arrived the following evening. It proved to bean otd-fashibne* safe, witb a large key lock. 'Thsre,'said the man, 'i" the safe. The look baa been working harder and harder -for weeks, nntil now 1 am looked ont. - I am in-a hurry to have it opened. Never mind the1 damage if you Will only break it in Short'Older." Our expert took the key and tried it, but it refused to work. He then took-'a small wire and ploked out half e-thttnbMul of dirt and lint from -the key,-trleo! Itagaln, and a bettor Working look Was never seen. 'How much is your bill?' As tola involved a trip, to and from CalaS>,~ of about 600 miles, and expense in proportion,' be ro-plieJ*40. Taking a roll of bills from his pocket he said: That is satisfactory, on . conditions. Does any one in the place know your business here?'' The'reply was 'No one;' 'AH right; then; get out by the next train, and keep mrrm; for I would gladly pay $100 rather than have any of my friends know that I was fool enough to go to Boston for a man toplck tbe dirt out of my key." ^   '' : -;-^-.a--:  9.1 Accident tea Xroutav i..t The Williamsport Oatttte and Bulletin says: "The trouting party that left thia city Saturday last for' 'This Knobs' in Clearfield county, oomcrised' of Walter Shooter, Prank Warfield and Fraok'Sher-woodi of Williamsport; Arthur^ PiersoD, of Lock Haven; Charles BslHahberd, ol Lyons, New York; James Hiohards, of Coming, New York; Wittiam' AkeTS, Jr., Frank Kennedy and Fred. Baker, of Pblla- . delphla, met with a sad misfortune on Wednesday night. On that night;-about 10 o'clock, Akers, Piersoh' and Kennedy went out of tbe tent, leaving tl�j others asleep; they took' with them a gen and a revolver, and with the intention of giving their comrades a serenaaV: firefliosT the gun and revolver several times. ^Mr.'Pier-son bad saluted' twlee wltti ttrW'refblver, and in lowering ..the - weapon it was accidentally discharged, the ball passing through the neck of Akars .between the windpipe and jugular vein and lodging in the left shoulder. The unlortunate vouog man was taken to Clearfield^ eighteen miles distant, where surgical i attention was given.' The ball was -exttaetefl, Mr., Akers refasiDg to take' anything In tbe shape of anesthetics. The'^otoif say tbat he will be in fit condition to start for home to-day. Messrs. Warfield and Baker remained with him in Clearfield, and the -rest of the party came home last night- ---  t --     ; Bentley'a She* Store.. The Bentley shoe store was opened to the public yesterday at: its new location on Main street. The stook is new and large and the public Is invited to call.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

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Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

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