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Lock Haven Express: Saturday, April 26, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - April 26, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                !� m I NINTH YEAR-NO. 49. -LOCK HAVEtf. t*A., SATURDAY. AFKIL 26. 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING- EXPRESS KINSI.035 RIIOTHEKS---PUBLISHER* CURR^T COMMENT. More than two thnusir.d farmers have applied to the Ayric'ultuia' Department for eeeds of tbe sugar beet. lira total [ailure ot Iho peaoh crop i� ouce more luim-unee-d. I'� will continue to bo announced U'Mil tbe crop somes into market. TEE FIRST ELECTROCUTION No Pkmqciiatic barque?, will boroafte** be ooraplcta without Messrs Cleveland acil DiiuE aaiuug this ftuo8is to illustrate hour th� Democrats 'Vc^t togftther." All the uewspiper descriptions of tli6 preaeut MUslssipi flooil do not opuvey sO olear au :;.c;t cf its mngTaitado as fcho fact that tlie laareB       tonota 927,000,000. Not for many years litis labor been as unf-elt.od and rcsuusa an at present. From all BiJcs uome reports of bUikcs or threats to do so, vs\W\ grievances, raimtaig UiTougfc the whole gamut from unbearable iojiwt-ice to most trivial ca rises. The Hazleton Plata Speaker admits tbat the Democrats have pot an even cbance of winning in the State. Considering tbe eighty thousand Republican mujoiity, tbe Plain Speaker cannot bo said to be giving ft&ttU dead ivw&y when ivttttetfc tkte Ituth. It was 'air aad square in tbe Republican Stats Committee to insist that tbe counties of Fulton and Elk bold county conventions and elect delegates to the State Convention, instead of permitting their delegates to be selected by the county committee, as bad already been done. Chicago's crusade against 'he aa\e of cigarettes and whisky drops io children under sixteen years of age is to be commended as an example to other* cities* Tbe police officers have been authorized not only to arrest seller*, bat also to confiscate the contraband property whet, found Id the hands of tbe youngsters. POfeTSIABTEB GESKIIAL WaNAMAREB IS very decidedly opposed to the idea of limiting the hours of labor of postal clerks and employes of first* second and third class post offices to eight boors ia the twenty-fonr. To do this would necessitate tbe employment of more than three ' thousand additional clerks at an expense of '82,162,479. He also says that upon cod-aultaVion with many ot the moat practical postmasters', he finds they are unaniroonfi In tbe opinion thai the scheme proposed would be detrimental to tbe pub He service* Improvement Items From Ltmir. John Watson is building c line storeroom 50x36, with a torn'a ball on second floor. � David Wiley has re roofed and ia repainting his residence. A. W. Mitchell has purchased tbe Marr property. Philip Krape bus bought a lot and will build a dwelling this summer. Jacob P. Krape is building one of tbe finest houses in tbe valley. C, W. Loveliud wiU build a horoa oo^ bis lot in the mat fuUira. Thomas Williams has broken ground for a furniture shop and dwelling combined. Our citizens in general are fixing up their bouses, building up pew fences, etc, giving the town a better appearance than It has bad for some time. William Kemmler Will Meet His Some Time Next Week. Doom TilE DEATH APPLUH0ES ALL KEADY BASK   BAIX BKCOIID. 1 Sunday Services. At East Main street M. E. ohurob: Sunday school at 9 o'clock, a. m , Young Peoples meeting at fl:45,p. m,, and preaching at 7:30. Preaching and sacrament of Lord's Sup* per at Fleming ton in th*j morning. PERSONAL   PI;nCILIN�8. Tbe Doomed Han Intends to Meet II I� Fate Unflinchingly - 3Co Sentimental Cnlluia to His Prison Cell and No Flowers to Cheer HU Last Hoori-Description of tbe Death Chamber. Auburn, April 25.-Tbe case of Wil Ham Kemmier, condemned to electrocution.  namo room, and is used for signalling. Next on the right is a C.r-drews volt mitre, a long narrow black walnut box, containing coiled wire, and Bur mounted by a guage which registers the electrical force in volts. Another box, long and n&ttow, ia on th� tight Mid con taina a teducing coft to diorioiftb the force of electricity before it enters th*s volt meter, or tbe lamp box otj the right. Be tween the reducer end volt meter is a small switch to turn tbe current ofl and on tbe meter. tote fatal applta2tck4. The-lamp box contains twenty-four six teen candle' power incandescent lamps, and shows when tbe current ia on and running steadily. Then comes two switches, one for short circuiting the current, tbe other, the fatal switch, carries ihe current to the wires connecting with the body of the condemned man. Two wires at the top connect with a dynamo one thousand foet 2iway in thfc Twctt vev&� oi tho prison. One of the wires at the bottom wilt be Don nee ted with the metal cap ro be worn ou the head, and the other will be adjusted io the base of Kemmler's spine. At preaeut tbe two wires remain dangling from the oailing. Tbey will bo attached to a board three feet square attached to the ceiling, which" is already in position, aud which is directly over the post where the cbair is to be placed. Warden Durston has not divulged the day of execution to a tiviug suul, but good guessera name the middle of the week as tbe time. The Three.OrgnnlzatluiiA and Their Stand-ins; to Data. NATIONAL LEAGUE. Cleveland-Cleveland, 10; Chicago, G. Pittsburg-Cincinnati, 10; Pittsburg, 1. rLAYElts' LEA UUK. Pittab-ug-CleveteDd, ft; VlttrtraTg, 8. Buffalo-Chicago, 10; Buffalo, 3. Standing of the Clubs, NATIONAL LEAGUE. Won. Lost.I Boston............. 4     1 Philadelphia... 3    1 PiLtsburt;......... 3    2 Cinci&mut.......3    2 Won. Los!. Chicago...........3     3 Olevelaud_...... 2    3 Brooklyn.........l    3 New York.,......1     4 Won. Lost. Athletic........... 4    2 Louisville-..... 4     2 Columbus,....... 4    2 Rochester........4     a auir.Lio. Boston.............. 3 Cblctijjo............"3 Piniuaelpli!a...'2 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION." Won. Lost. | St. Louis..........4    2 Brooklyn.........2    4 SyracuHe..........2    4 loledo.........- i    i flayers' league. Won. Lost. i Won. Lout. ........4    l   New Yurfc........2    2 Pltiabart,--------2    3 Brooklyn.,..T 2 3 Cleveland........ 1     4 David P. Starr, Deputy County Treasurer, went to Renovo to-day. Sheriff Leahy made an early trip to Pice Station this morning, returning to tbe city on Erie Mail. W. K. Chesnutt, Associate Judge and postmaster at lie novo, was in the city a few hours last evening. John B. Myers, Esq., and W. H. Clougb are at Sunbury to-day for tbe purpose of arguing a legal case before the judge oi the court. Mrs. L. Fiak, who is visiting In California, is reported very sick and expects to start for her home in tbis city as soon as she is able to travel. Right Rav. Bishop RuUfiou will officiatu in Williamsport to-morrow, in tbe morning at CbriBt Episcopal Church and in the evening at Trinity Cfaurob. Mr. and Mrs; Jacob Oepbart entertained upwards of fifty of their friends last nigbt, at their residence on Railroad street. Refreshments were served, and the evening was pleasantly spent. Mr. Archie Monroe, of the firm of Fredericks, Monroe & Co., tbe operators of the Jfarrandsville Fire Brick/ Works, was a passenger on Erie mail west Friday morning, Mr. Monroe has been the superintendent cf the above works for a number of years end is one of the best posted men on tbe manufacture of briok and the brick industry in genettlta tbe cauntty.-Renovo Nettt. ''JatAieau1* Monday NlsV1' "Laugh aud the world laughs with you.-" Thai's why Vernona Jarboau and hor excellent company are bo popular, end the performance of "Starlight" a most enjoyable one. Oue secret of the success of tbe company now making its tour and will bo at the Opera House Monday night, is that each one is allowed full liberty to make a hit. Tuere are no jealousies existing, and where each doe supplements tbe work of the other a clover performance is assured. The play, of course, is designed for displaying of Miss Jarbeau's special talents. But nevertheless there are a number of artists in the company of more than usual merit, wbo&q efforts to v^a&e- amnta contribute to the interest of the' play. Act 1 opens with an Italian scene at tbe "Sj uv of Vesuvius." Miss Jarbcau is an innocent shepherdess with a bright and winning manner aud a splendid voice, who is caught up by a musical crank, who tbiuks be has secured another Pafcti, is brought to America, where she makes her debut at a fashionable reception. Miss Jar beau sings several sougs, both French and English, and gives a very amusing imitation of Mme. Theo's English song, "Where Are Tou Going My Pretty Maid." The last act is iu the manager's musical store, where he rehearses his new opera, in wnicUYie. ia trving iobrir.^ out hia new Mar, "A Child of Destiny, ' *nd now the fuu begins. Solos, dnetn, quartettes, dauces and funny inotdunts follow each other in quick succession, and Miss Jar-beau sings her own topical song, with which she has made a success, "That's Enough, Djn't You Think." DnBois Will Have a Street Railway. At the next meetiug of tbe council of the borough of DuBo'is a pelUiouwiU bo presented asking for tbe granting of rigbt of way through the town for tbe construction of an electric street railway. A charter has been applied for and the cost is estimated at $75,000. The lice wilt run between the Allegheny Valley low grade railroad station and the Buffalo, Rochester and PittHburg. The project shows tbe kind of enterprise that abounds at DuBois and is making business boom at that place. Death of Dr. W. K. Hall. Dr. W. E. Hall, of Renovo, died yes-dayday at Norfolk, Va., wboro he bad gone some time ago. Uis brother, Hon. J. K. P. Hall, was with him when be died. Tbe news, of Dr. IlaWa oeatb Tt&cheo Renovo yesterday afternoon by telegraph. His death was BUdden and unexpected. Dr. Hall was in good health when he went Sonth four weeks ago with his brother, Hon. J. P. E. Hall, who was convalescing from fover.  He was In bis 49th year. Five Tears For Prefect King. Philadelphia. April, 25.-Henry W. King, ex-prefect of the Pennsylvania Institution for tbe blind who was last week convicted of crimes of a grossly immoral nature at the institution, was today sentenced to five years in the Eastern Penitentiary. A Generous Donation. Tub WilUamsport Sun says: "The State Food Committee wrote to ex-Mayor Fores-man on or about April 9, makingjnquiriee as to the drowning of Calvin Miller at South Williamsport during tbe June flood. The information was sent to the Commission and after a proper investigation the Commission tounA that tbe widow of Cai-vin Miller was/eutitled to relief at their bands. Mrs. Miller now resides at Northumberland. She has four children, aged respectively 3, 3, 11 aud 13 years. On April 14 tbe Commission sent Mrs. Miller two siogle drafts, ono for $500 and one for $200. Accompanying these drafts was a statement that each one of tbe four children would receive $50 a year until tbey reach the age of 16. When all the children have reached that age tbe family will receive $2,500. Mrs. Miller desires to express bar gratitude to all that have rendered assistance in ber time of need, fler friends in Suutli Wiiliamaport will be pleased to know that she hay received ibis moufay. SUNDAY  SERVICES. ECHOS OP TOWN TALK. The tool th&llb� wise ot heart. JiocsMtems Taken From Onr Beporter' Note Book. LATEST NEWS FROM POUR WAED JXon Improvement.-Off for l>*nvill�-City Miriut-BrMcBulldtnc-Ttw B.lUIno Not Burned-Imtltotloj a Crop-WJ11 Mot. Next ITMk-HlUBH of Soldier. Wanted. The palatini residence of Counollrdan Wilson KiBller on Weat Cbnrnb street ia being painted ia a combination of colore that add much to Jte appearance of the building. Tbe removal of the fenoea around the property ia also a great Improvement and enhances the beauty of tbe Mr. B. O. Chapman, general agent of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, t>aa greattj improved the exterior of his handsome residence on Weat Cbnrcb street by repainting it. Several substantial sidewalks are being pnt down in different parts ol the oity. This is a kind of an Improvement that we cannot have too ranch of. Ex-Coancilmaa Joseph Candor is building an addition to Us residence on West Church street and making other improve, aients to hie property. Brlda*. Betiding- Contractor E, T. Gallagher yesterday SniBhed his work on the stone work of the abatments Bnd pier of the bridge at the east end of Great Island. Tbe work is -vteU done aud u tmtmDKd t&� County Commissioners a very satisfactory job. Commissioner Klookner sajs tbe bridge seats are tbe finest of any bridge in this station of the State. The work of "swinging np" the iron superstructure of the bridge at tbe west end of the Island is progressing as rapidly as posaible, and by to-morrow evening will be completed, if no accident oocurB. Will Mov. Next Week. The main building and one wing of the new Normal aohool building is so nearly completed that it is likely tbe faculty and etndeots will vacate the Montour House next week and remove to the new building. The exaot date of removal has not been decided upon. Vat \l the weatVet'� fine Vt is quite likely to be a day of jubilee. A grand procession, beaded by the Catholio band is contemplated and would be just tbe thing. v Cltj Market. The attendance at market grows larger as the gardens begin tD grow and each week the supply of garden products is augmented. Butter sold at 25 and cents a pound; eggs, two dozen for 25 cents; potatoes, 75 cents a husbel; lettuoe 5 cents a head; rhubarb, 5 cents a bunch; epinaoh and onions were plenty and sold at low prices; chickens, 70 to 75 cents a pair; dressed ones, 40 cents eaob. OS fa* Dunllto. A special train, which arrived in this oity early this Burning from Renovo, had on board one hundred and four Odd Fellows from that place, bound for Danville. The Juven le band was with them. Twenty, four members of the fraternity (rom this oity joined the party, and will spend the day in Danville attending the anniversary of the order. -m-- The BiilldlaRS Not Burned. James David is in the city to day and says the report that his farm buildings at "Soootac1' were burned was incorrect. Two days of hard work Sghting fire bow-ever was required to save them. All the vrooden fences on the farm were burned ana over a,\mao.rea tru\t bearing peach trees were killed by the fire. PUNGENT POT POVKBI. ^ Bf laerllamou. Mixture of Seas, aad Non-aenso BelMsrad and tfcrlbbled. I If APRIL. About thin time. In ardent thyme. Tbe post sings the season. He pipes his note And soaks bis ooat W Unoul a fear or freezta'. The gentle tramp Will now revamp His tale or woe and sadnefv; He'll get a "load." And "take the road" In alcoholic gladness. Tour wife, whose grace And pretty face Yon thought bo perfect, now will lAOk Ilka a fright. Armed with a while-Wash brush, broom, mop and towel. Tired husbands are asking: "Will the garden rake itself?'' Bass fishermen an lunging for the leafy month of June. It will soon be time to tear'another leaf from the oalendar. New riding boots for ladles have natty heels that are meant to be seeu. Tennis things are in tbe windows. The correct slipper for the bride is pointy-toed and made of white snede. Cioar colored stockings are new. Mock rubies are seen on bonnets. Monogram bangles are a novelty. A YOUNG PLUNGER'S CAREER Services at the Reformed Cburch at tbe usnul hours. Sunday School at 9:30 a. ro. German Bervivos at 2 p. m. Preaching at the Evangelical Church at 10:20 a. to. and 7:15 p. m. Sunday School at 0:30 a. m. Prayer and class meeting at G p. m. Services at the Baptist Church conducted by the pastor Rev. R. W. Perkins, at 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p. m. Sunday Sohcol at 2:15 p. m. At Trinity M. E Church preaching morning and eveutng at the usual hours by the pastor, ltcv. 3. \. Wood, jr. Sunday School at 2 p. m. Young Peoples Alliance at 0:30. At the Disciple Churoh, Hev. J. H. Mundy, pastor. Sunday School at 9:15. Preaching at 10:30. Young; People's Prater meeting at 6:30 p. m and evening services at 7:30. Prayer meeting every Wednesday evening. At the Eoglisb Lutheran Churoh there will be preaching at 10:30 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. The morning sermon will be preached by Rev. P. A. Heilman, a former pastor and now of BJoomsburg, Pa. The evening Botmou will bo preaobed by Rev. E. H. Dornblaser, of Wheeling, W. Va. I Bundav School a,t 2 p. m. and Yonnn Peo-I pie's Prayer meeting at 6:30 p, m. Xndtltatlng a Camp, A delegation of ten members of P. O. S. of A. from this oity assisted in instituting a new camp at Howard last nigbt. District President A. E. Graham was present as instituting officer. There was a parade of about fifty visiting members in tho evening. Tbe new camp ia about thirty strong. ---�  -- Names of Soldiers Wanted. Tbe Superintendent of the Census has sent a communication to John S. Bittner Post, G. A. R., asking for a complete list of names of soldiers, term of service and cnldtat'a widows, la the Poat'%, jrutaUcUaa, Tbo list is now being made out and will be forwarded as soon as oompleted. These Were Omitted. In addition to the list of persons who will take a part in tbe Business Men's Jubilee next Tuesday evening are the following.. Miss Mama Reese, bairstore represented by Miss Bessie Day, and Mosber & Shaffer, ^flonr and feed, represented by Miss Joila Reed. High School Examination. Examinations for graduation of the pupils of the Renovo High School were bagan yesterday morning. Prof. Murphy of Emporium, and Revs. Moore and Cook, of Kenoto, are the examining, committee, and will conolude their labor to day. Henahaw -and Ten Broeok of "Two Old Cronies" fame will star next season io. their new eomedv, "Th* Kaboba." Tbey are expected here in September. "Onr Irish Visitors" played to  medium slued house last nigbt. The music of lb* orchestra was excellent, the singing and dancing good, and Murray and Mor-pby oanaed a great deal of merriment by their funny antics and bumorone sayings, jllss Ada Melrose, wbo was seen here last with "Little Nugget" ia a member of this company, and danoed herself into tbe good graces of all present without much effort. Have you secured seats for Jarbeauf We should like to see a big booaa Hun-day nigbt to greet Vernona Jarbeau in "Starlight." A delightful entertainment ve, tuaiantned. Io. Isja man ot th* W. ot the season. Who baa the most fun the man who owns a horse, or tbe possessor of a bicycle? Bine ia very pretty and baa been in high favor for room decoration, but the latest rags is for yellow, and few houses will be considered complete next winter without a '*yellow room." There are lavender gloves with blank points for half mourning. This will be a good season to Insist upon tbe theory that ioe water drinking ia injurious. Tkk ntaattfin of levun% horse*, w streets unbitohed and unattended ia dan. gerous as well as unlawful. Sfbino bair outaare timely. Use a soft towel, and in drying rub upward. Lemon juice is daintier than vinegar 0n a salad. Don't be in a hurry about removing stovea. A German from the Settlement yesterday got off this without a stop- "Ztegenbocks-bjeroberundunterkrlegsbefehlshaber." tm YifcVcnvfca ton man H� nvaterVaa; Vba' farmers. PnrLADELPiA muffins are shipped to distant cities. A gold necklace will mark the neck if it touobes free powder. A drugoist says a tree tomato diet lends brillianoy to the eyes. Fried potatoes, German style, are browned ou both sides In butter. Pat tbe printer. . Don't spare the lime. A dbuo clerk saya tbe persistent use of onions will break up malaria. Tbe only sleeve on a styliab new dreaa a.band of ostrich feathers. Tbe beel of a man's shoe should be just �eren-eigbtbs of an inob high. One of our slim young men was walking op town the other evening between a couple of well developed yonng ladies, when an irreverent urobln remarked: There is not much him In that sandwich" A Stjnbdrt girl tried to commit sulolde because she was growing fat Congress mVttjht s^ve. h.�t a hint om the. reduction of the surplus. Extravagance Works the Downfall of One of Maaaachuaetta Aristocratic Sons, A    rOEGEK    AND    EMBEZZLES. T�e District Attorney of Saltui, Massachusetts, Confesses to Stealing- 40,00*)-. Wrecking Bis Wife's Fortune-Forging; HI. Friends Name.; and Raining His Family. ^alem, .Mass., April 25.-Lawyer Oeorge B. Ives, a member of an old and proud Salem family, a graduate of Harvard, and, nntil a day or two ago, Assistant District Attorney of Essex county, is a eeif-oonfeesed forger to the extent of $30,-000. He was arrested this morning at his house on Chestnut street, in the ultra fgabionable quarter. He was arraigned before Judge Safford, the life-long friend of IIOMK HARDSHIPS IN WAR. A North  Cnrolioa LadT Describes Some of . Her Experiences. FrojQ Ibe Raleigh, (N. C.) News, '-TV Tbe third year of the war balled into �ervice our entire male population. It was remarked by some that the oradle and tbe 4rrave bad been cahhvd.^ Qnlss vsaii. 1 minority tried to shirk duty, and tbey we;e caught by tbe Conscript act; The young men bad long since learned'that "oi)'T the brave deserve the fair." Every day the encircling lines of war were becoming more and more rigid. Imported food and raiment bad long bean' out off >>y the "blookade." But is there any possibility to starve the industrious and ingenious on tbi. green earth? Sugar, coffee and tea were-fast becoming things of the past. By some means th* sorghum plant of which a kind of molasses is made was introduced among us and actively;,, cultivated. I've seen mauy a lady formerly aCCUBtomed only to the parlor around tbe. diBtillery, heameaxed. � *ci.\\v�� traora 8]oW. Ives forged the name of Captain B. Pranok Fabens, and made him bis principal indorser on notes for various amounts, placed with the Salem^banks. the-trash came. "A day or two ago Fabens learned that hiB name was on a large amount of Ives' notes, whioh were due, but not met. It uras an easy matter for Ives to renew these notes by simply committing more forgeries, as hs bad done earlier in his oareer of crime, bat he seemed to have been unable to stand tbe mental strain. So, unable to meet the notes, he allowed tben> to go to protest and awaited tbe crash. "So* nrMSn c-mre vrnvin ^i\t."?iDeri6 prc-nounoed his indorsements on Ives' notes to be barefaced forgeries. Then Ives' father's old law parrner, Colonel Solomon Lincoln Jr., heard that bis name was ou another batoh of Ives' notes, and again tbe charge of forgery was made. Ives was brought into the presence lot Leveretts Tueasrman,presidentof the First National Bank, and ex-Mayor Huntington, of the Salem Bank, both of them bu own and bis family'a intimate friends. At first he tried to brazen out tbe matter and refute tbe terrible accusation ; but, when confronted with the proofs, be broke dowu and confessed. He claimed that extravagant living bad been the oause o\Ma nnwnHW Tu^uAal ol the amount of bis forgeries and stealings is about $10,-000, of whioh $20,000 was raised on writ-log other men's names on his notes. his wife's fortune wrecked. The way he squandered tbe $75,000 estate of his wife exeites popular indigua tlon, even more than his wholesale forgeries. Ives bad obargo of her property from tbe day of his marriage, but not a dollar of it remains, and her ohlldren are penniless- While a good deal of Ives' money waB wasted on extravagant living, mnoh of it also was lost in speculation. Like many others be bought Atohison, Topeka and Santa. Fe stock, realised handsomely, but VosX hcavvl\ "when \t tank, van �\nn\nt.v�a. which it ia vainly trying  to recover. lass graduated at Harvard in 1S76. Signed bv th. president. Washington, April 25.-The President has signed the World's Fair bill. ..Tbe President has also signed the joint resolution that Congress passed to-dav appropriating $150,000 to enable tbe georetary of War to distribute rations for tbe relief of the destitute people in tbe distriot overflowed by tbe Mississippi and its tributaries. Normal Graduates Married. Miss Amanda J. Rodes, a graduate of Look Haven Normal, class of '82, is now Mrs. Rev. J. P. Koontz, of Rayville, Md. Miss Mary Pie, of Newark, Del., a graduate of Look Haven Normal, class of '83, was married Aoril 15% to kit. John QiVdsa^ \of BelU!�,0. ' to � delicious syrnp. It beeame a 'great ' buoocsb. and after using it a iew months, no Porto Rico molasses was ever-mors palatable. .: ..".u:.yi      . �-, For coffee and tea the ladies substituted"�� parched rye and parched sweet potatoes, and many other things. Every family who bad any of the genuine ertiole rrservod it for PartiTlar occasions. Special invitations to dinner Implied that ooffee would be served. I recall with pleasure several ' savory meals, the chief dishes being fried ham, biscuits and real coffee.' Bat to shot? what creatures of habit we are, I heard a lady after returning - from such a while s'PP'ng parched rye, rT belftve I like it better tban sure-enough coffee1." For clothing we turned to" rewuroet within our reach. Tbe wheel and 'cards i and l��m were put In active' � operation, whioh made lively music that could be beard all over tbe land. In my a rat spun dress I felt us proud ar if robed in ailfe. - Formerly. Sue dresses adorned only tbe wealthy; imported goods and styles from foreign markets wore their glory.':*Now ..: an opportunity was presented for the poor bat industrious and'inzoafous'to emolata"--'; dress. The achievements In home man- ' ufactures by all classes were really mar-in\cs�" V^SSx* \saVb vA Vnwtfi "Straw were very beautiful, gloves made of Scraps of fjD0 black merino, embroidered'.' on the back with white silk, looked like Parisian work. And such lovely dyes, concocted from the roots and bark of our native wood, were scarcely ever heboid. ' ,'    .   - Xn those times of exigencies there' were resources discovered never thought of before, and there was given to us one unfailing source of help-"of bog and hominy" we bad plenty. The negroes-the bone of contention bo-twceo the belligerents- were as faithful workers as ever. That a war was.'beiug waged they knew-but for what, purpose they seemed "ignorant. 'Vneie.a'iB many inequalities atwut tbe war. One was that among tbe people were persons wbo did not own a slave, did  -notbalieve in. slavery.  I know of such an instance-spent the night with the family . just before the war.: Tbey had ten living children, four dangbterr and six song-all quite grown and but one married.  On -this particular evening, after supper, tbe old mother sat in the corner and picked cotton, looking tbe. very pioture of' oou-   -tentinent.    The daughters with., -their work, gathered around. A neighbor or two dropped in, and sev- : eral ol the boob-noble looking young men clean and well brushed-swelled tbe circle-   One of the suns drew., forth bis fiddle, another his banjo, and with work, talk aud sweet musio tbe hours flew on : golden wings. No suc'a pleasant.seene was ever witnessed there afterward. _ The war came on, and within the Brat year Sve sons had volunteered. . Iu less than one year four had fallen, only one. being left to toll 'ho sad tale, and be still survives. A.(wr the brothers left for the battles tbe sisters-pretty   girls-were   driven  by . necessity to the cotton field.  With tbeir : brother's old coats and hats on, behind tboplow or boe iu bund, they might have been taken for tbe boy's ghosts, so much  -alike were they. � ,, Tbe parents of this family bad always :~ been noted for piety, but'thla nataatropbe greatly shook their faith. The old father said be had not doue anything to bring on the war-was free from the charge of hsvlng sympathy evan in tbe main cause that occasioned it-and yet he had been made to pay the higaest forfeit.  HeMonld : not understand bow a just God permitted v suoh inequality.  It was whispered about by many of his friends tbathe was on tbe ' verge or infidelity. But I am thankful to-, state that when the old man dled-^end neither parent lived long after tbis-it was: with Job's faith, "Though He slay me, yet will I trust him. V Now is your-chance. Tbe Philadelphia jfifrf/i American oflora a prize of {50,000,- . 000 to �he persou guessing the exaot date wben the world wil? pome to an end. In . case there are two parsons who hit upon ithsvrenuM accouds each wUlr^^ve. 420---1000,000. J ,        j :�-*.-bS �S1' m �^�rtf.'?;   

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Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

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Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

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Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

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