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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: February 19, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - February 19, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                oeitm EIGHTH YEAll-NO 2i)0. LOCK HAVEST, PA., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUAKY 19, 1890. PBICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS KI.VSLOK BKOTHEKS---PtlBMSHBKS HESPL.T OF TUB c1t1t EUSOTIOIf, Joseph Grafius, the best Treasurer that Lock Haven ever bad, Was defeated jester-(lay fur a third term by his Democratic com politer, Geo. P. Shaffer. Mr, Grafius made a gitUaut fight and although defeated goes doiro with colors flying. It wasopposition iu bis own party that largely biongbtabout hia defeat and what satisfaction there is for the Republicans who engaged in Buob work is not apparent to the average mind, E/erybody concedes' that Mr. Grafius bas served tho people well as City Treasurer and had be been elected there is no doubt he would have continued to do so. We hoped and believed that be would be elected, but as the majority has decided otherwise we accept this decission with the bjst grace possible. The Republican majority iu this city is too small for the party to engage in faotional fights at the polls and it was through Republican votes that the Democrats gained their victory. The successful candidate for City Trea* urer, Mr. George P. Shaffer, is a gentleman well liked by ail who know him, and be conducted his personal canvass in an honorable and gentlemanly manner. If he makes as good a Treasurer as the gentleman whom he is to succeed, the people will not regret their choice. The Republican tickets in the First and Second wards also suffered from seratchlng and as a result the candidates for Council and School Director in the First ward were defeated, and the Councilman and one School Director in the Seoond were snowed under S. Z. Martin, the Republican candidate for the long term in the School Board from this ward, narrowly escaped defeat, his majority being only three. Tfce strong effort to beat Alderman Parsons, the Republican candidate, for re-eleotion in this ward came near being successful, as be is elected by only one majorty. In the Third and Fourth wards the Republican candidates for Council were successful and Captain Michaels is re-elected in the latter ward for School Director. There will bo no change in City Council, the political complexion of the new Couo- j cil beiU� the same as the present oue, viz:. Seven Democrats and five Republicans. The Democrats gain two School Directors and the new Board will be a tie, six Re publicans and six Democrats. The present Aldermen iu the Second, Third and Fourth wards are re-elected, the Republi. cans having two and the Democrats one. RESULT IN THE STATE. Senator Keybuni Will Succeed the Late Judge Kelley. BEPTJBLIO ASS WIN TS PHILADELPHIA CURRENT COMMENT. "United we stand, divided we fall." Tnis is the "I told you so" man's busy day. Utah is putting on her wedding garments. Nature has wisely arranged matters so that a man can neither pat his own back nor kick himself. The English Government proposes to make seven hours the legal day for clerks in the departments. A jiUiiBEit of Pennsylvania towns, we observe have taken steps to celebrate the coming birthday or the Father of his Country with appropriate ceremonies. It is recognized as a general principle in morals and manners, says the Philadelphia Press, that the man who sends an ia-fernal machine is an infernal scoundrel, This would seem to take in the Mississippi man who recently sent such a maohine to Senator Iogalls, and yet this cannot be, for Mississippi turns out poly high-toned, chivalrous gentlemen, as all the world knows through the South's own declara tiou. West VntmxrA la described by tourists as something of an earth ly paradise. The climate is genial, the soil is fertile, the air is healthful, the scenery is beautiful- as Bishop Rebel's hymn sums it op; "Every prospect pleases and only man is vile." But intending settlers who read of the frequent White Cap outrages in that State, conclude that the indigenous man is too vile for them, and so they go farther to find their homes, and West Virginia remains a wilderness. A pioneer corps of missionaries is badly needed in that State. The O'gfiea xMvorce Soft. London, Feb. 18.-In the probate divorce and admiralty division of the High Court of Justice to-day Justice Butt refused to grant the application made in behalf of Captain O'Sbea for tho writ of attachment against the manager* of the Star and tho London edition of the New York Herald for publishing certain comments relative to the action for diroroe brought by Captain O'Shea against his wife in which Mr. Parnell is named as corespondent. In the case of the Freeman's Journal, of which paper similar application was made, tho court imposed a fine of �100 besides compelling him to pay the costs of tho action. Everhart's grove, West Chester, is full of blackbirds. j Tb� Whole City Ticket does Through By tho Ceual Sweeping Majority-What the Returns From tb* Various Cities and Towns of tbe htate Show-The RepabU-cana Helntatn Their Standlog. Psiladeu'hia, Feb. 18-A local elee tiou for Receiver of Taxes, City Solicitor, Councilmen and twenty-one police magistrates was held to-day. At the same time a separate election for the unexpired term of the late Judge Kelley, was held in the Fourth Congresaional district. On account of the length of tbe ticket and the amount ol cutting indulged in by the adherents of the rival magistrate candidates, only the most meagre returns have been received up to midnight. Tbe indications are, however, that John E. Reyburn, Republican, will be Judge Kelley'e successor in Congress by a slightly reduced majority. Captain John Taylor, Republican, was elected Receiver of Taxes, and Charles T. Warwick, Republican, was re-elected City Solicitor by about tbe nsnal majorities. merkitt fob, mayor of ukad1no. Reading, Feb. 17.-This city elects as mayor, Thomas H. Mertitt, Democrat, over Mayor Kenney, Republican, by about' 550 majority. Tbe Democrats re-elect J. Lawrence Letz, city controller, and John Hobold, treasurer, and all their city as sessors by majorities rangiug from 800 to 1,200, and will control both branches of council. chajsbeesbhbq REl'ubi.lCAKS win. Chambersrcrg, Pa., Feb. 13.-In the boroogh election Ftekerick Henninger, Republican, for burgess, was elected by 59 majority. Jacob Brand, Democrat, for tax collector, was elected by 24 majority. The entire council is Republican. tb� result at siiusf. nte. Beli-ekoste, Feb. IS.-The Democrats to-day elected Reber mayor by 130 majority, and Schofield poor overseer by 52 majority. Tbe rest of the ticket is Republican by majorities ranging from 20 to DO. bepublicah victories at chester. Chester, Feb. 18.-Fourteen of the eighteen preeinots of Chester give Coates, Republican, 593 majority for mayor. The Republicans elect thirteen of the sixteen common and seven of the eight 'select councilmen, the City Treasurer and Controller. democrats win at york. York, Pa., Feb. 18.-D. R. Noell, Democrat, was re-elected Mayor by nearly 1000 majority, over Klinefelter, Republican. MiUel, Democrat, was elected Controller. Tbe vote tor City Treasurer is so close that the result will hardly be known tonight. TOE RESULT AT LANCASTER. Lancastsr, Feb. 18.-Robert Clark, Democrat, was eleoted mayor by 218 majority. Tbe Republicans retain control of both branches of the City Council. at other i-oints. Chester-Coates, Republican, was elected Major to-day. Gettysuoko-Mayor H. S. Bonner, Democrat, was elected burgess by eighteen majority. Carlisle-Captain E. B. Watts, Republican, was elected Mayor by a majority of 200 over H. G. Carr, Democrat. J. 11. Kemmerer, D., was elected Burgess of Bethlehem. In South Bethlehem, II. Stanley, R , was re-lected. Col. Lehr, D., was elected Mayor of Al-lentown by 300. Tiros 11. Evans was eleoted Burgess of Norristowo by 132. Burgess Todd, of Pittston, was re-elected by 703. H. J. Gairly was elected Mayor or Pittsburg by 5,000. Tho Republicans eleotod their ticket at Altoona. PjiusiijxviiXE-March, Democrat, was elected burgess by 204 msjority. Pottsvillk-The entire Republican ticket was eleoted. Dovi.ertown-James Kane, Democrat, was eleoted chief burgess by three majority. West   Chester-Entire   Republican ticket was eleoted bere to-day. (.VCOHIJiO COUNTY, Controller is re elected by a majority of about 200. Guorge House], the Republican candidate fof City Treasurer is elected b* handsome majority. The resnlt on the Board of Asset-sors at this hour, midnight, is not known, but the chances favor the Republicans.   . A very full vote was polled, and the results on Councils will not be known tonight. Willlemsporfs Democratic Rtttyor Defeated For Ite-eleelloa. Williamsuobt, Feb. IS.-Frederick II. Keller, Republican, was elected Mayor of this city to day by a majority of 735, over the present incumbent, James S. ForeB-roan, Democrat. This is a severe rebuke to Mayor Foresman, who nrade a hitler fight for re election. His defeat, iu mainly attributed to the scandal iu connection with the disbursement of tbe Hood relief funds. Dan Riley, the labor candidate, falls far below expectations, while the Prohibition rote is insignificant. Staugbton George, tbe Democrat City A tM'EEK LAW SUIT. the Ex Alt Alined Cue or nods* tout of H�,70O. SirequEHANKA, Pa., Feb. 18.-Susque. banna oounty is greatly excited over a very queer law suit. Philander Brown and his wife, of Lathi op township, were last week arrested and brought before 'Esquire CourtrighC, in Moutroae, charged by Paul Hill, of Latbrop, with fleecing him out of $3,700. Hill says that Brown and bis wife claimed to be Spiritualists; that they represented to him that Jesus Christ was in need of a large sum of mosey and that be (Hi))) must (apply it. Brown also claimed that he bad received letters asking formouey and signed "Jesus ChrtBt," and that ho had also received letters purporting to have come from a deceased relative stating that be was very much in need of money and clothes. After one of tbe most exciting trials ever held in this country Brown and his wife were held to bail, iu default of which they were sent to jail. Brown now brings suit against Hill and A. EI. McCollum, his attorney, for damages amounting to $100,000, and also against Constable Orlando Watrous and 'Esquire Courtright for 410,000 each for false imprisonment. Mr. McCollutn is a brother of J ustice McCollum, of tbe Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. What the final result of this strange case will be it Is hard at this time to predict. ELECTION IN THE CITY. A Factional Fight Elects a Democratic City Treasurer. BESULT IN THE VAEI0US WARDS, PUNGKST  POT  POUM. To-Klghl's Attraction. Jules Verne's imaginary trip, "Around the World in Eighty Day's," has been brought prominently before the public by reason of the recent achievements of Nellie Bly and Elizabeth liisland, and of oourse the dramatization of the strange story is full of interest. It is a spectaoular production, and wilt be presented at the Opera Honse this evening. Tbe tourists go through so many countries, all of which are picturesque, that there is opportunity to make a good display in the way of scenery, which is taken advantage of in all the six acts. Tableaux are shown of the Suez canal, an Eastern buugalo and pagoda, a funeral pyre designed for a pretty widow, a hotel at Calcutta, a station on the Union Pacific railway in a snow storm, the Rocky Mountains, a train of snow-covered cars, csbiu and deck of a steamship, a startling explosion on the ship, when tbe boilers burst and tbe ship goes down (tbe most effective Iu tbe piece), a hotel in Liverpool, club rooms and others, which furnish a great variety for tbe setting of the incidents of the journey. The company is a good one, oompriBiug a full ballet corps and many specialty artists. The trip across tbe American continent is a startling bit of realism, and the play throughout is full of exciting and laughable incidents. The Snwtvlle Property Attached. Lowell, Mass., Feb. 18.-Tho Sawtelle property in Boston has been attached for (3,000 on behalf of Frank L. Richardson, with whom Isaac Sawtelle spent several days when he loft Boston with Uiram'a little daughter. The suit 1b baseil upon expenses incurred in procuring a pardon lor Isaac and an agreement made by Isaao to give Richardson 11,500 when he should be relcaaed from pr.sou. Us la Proud or lilt Son. Paris, Fob. 18.-M. Bouober, ao Or-leanist member of the Chamber of Dep-ties, has received from Havana a dispatch from the Count of Paris, father of the Duke ol Orleuus, in which he says: "lam proud of my son and pleased with the attitude he has taken, but I am deeply concerted on account of bis sentence." The Weather. A storm, central near Lake Erie yesterday, moved cast northeast and is followed by a cold wave of slight intensity. Snow is predicted for tbe lake region to dsy, and probable light scows for this section tomorrow. A  Knnewey  Boy- Banuuet  at  the Cation.  House-To   Vacate A   Itoail- The Weather-Buried To-Day-A Cold Wave -To-Nlght*i Attraction. The city election yesterday resulted in a (Victory for the Demoorats. They gained ithe City Treasuryship, two School Directors and held their own in City Council, The city is naturally Republican and had there been no factional fights at tbe polls wo would have a different story to tell to-day.   Tbe new Council will be follows: Quigley, Kreamor, Mosser, Ely, Fulton, Scheid, McLeod, Smith, Kingler, Haber-stroh, Eistler and Seid. Seven Democrats and five Republicans, the first five being Republicans. The School Board will be: Myers, Martin, Gould, Morlock, Klapp, Michaels, f'aup, Simon, Rittman, Welliver, Bridgens and McCloskey. Six Republicans and six Democrats, the first six being Republicans. The vote in full for all of the officers voted for is as follows: First ward-Treasurer, Shaffer 237; Grafius 180; Council, Charles Scheid 210; John A Marshall 200; School Director, L. R. Paup, 23D; A. J. Schuyler 183; Constable, John B. Gheer 189; Bills Myers Assessor, Biird Eckert 236; M. C. Lingle 183; Judge of Election, Edward Goldateiu 250; George W. Tucker 101; Inspector, E. G. Herman 183; L. M. Smale, 227. Second ward-Treasurer, Shaffer 109; Grafius 159; Council, X. B. Ringler 228; Adam Zigler 132; Alderman, Joseph Parsons 181; George W. Batoheler 180; School Director, 8. Z. Martin 180; Peter Beck 177; H. Simons, 218; G. W. Webb 135; Assessor, A. L. Merrill 204; D. C. Johnson, 150; Constable, Robert Martin 174; Dan Me-Glnty (i; Judgo of Election, B. F. Lindig 182, J. N. Farnaworth 179; Inspeotor, J. B. Martin 1S5; W. A. Sloan 170. Third Ward-Treasurer, Shaffer, 120; Grafius, 132; Council, Wilson Eistler, 199; Joseph Candor, 94; David Mosser 102; Alderman, J; W. Harris, 19B; School Director, G. L. Morlook, 147; Constable, John Caudor, 129; Assessor, G. KintEtug, 140; J. M. Daut'r, 110; Judge of Election, H. Keener, 138; J. A. McNerney, 119; Inspector, George R. Ricker, 137; W. J. Lsfferty, 121. Fourth ward-Treasurer, Shaffer, 231; Grafius, 09; Council, E. W. Bigony, 157, Samuel Fulton, 172; Alderman, O. T. Noble, 209; A. R. Merrick, 112; Assessor, John Heimer, 181; DaniBl Frank, 142; Constable, -W. H. McCallum, 144; Christ Mogenhan, 161; School Direotor, Jacob Crown. 148; George T. Michaels, 179; Judge of Election, John McCloskey, 170; Edward Crist, 150; John Sohooley, 10; Inspector, Joseph Conwell, 162; Joseph Paul, 103. the tote for treasurer. The following is the vote by wards for City Treasurer'at tho eloction yesterday: Grailus. Shaffer. First ward................. 180 Second ward............... 159 Third ward................ 132 Fourth ward...............   09 570 237 199 120 231 793 570 A OTlaccllaneons Sllxtare of Sense nnd Nonsense Scissored and scribbled. Naturb evens things up in Its own thorough war. Such eonelaslon we cannot escape; When tbe KLrla la a corset concern, strike for pay The employer then gets out of shape. Too High for tbe Opening Bid.-A young woman began a. song "Ten Thousand Leaves are Falling." Bbe pitched it too high, soreeobed and stopped. "Start her at 5,000," oried an auctioneer. Sfare the rod and let the fish story do the work. Its a wise fly that knows a bald head in spite of a wig. Cold as it may be do mas cares for a coat on his tongue. A few stiff horns will make many a timid man a pugnacious bull. Never ask a woman what she Is doing when she iB trying to sing. �.vauelei> violet hairpins are new, and not likely to last long in style. Codfish pis, with a soda biscuit crust, is an old dish that is being revived. The debutante is usually launched into society in white satin slippers, or what ever the color ol her dress is. A new cigar case that also extinguishes and saves up a half-smoked weed without letting the stench escape is out. That which is utterly unfit for human food is usually given to tbe poor. This is the time of year during wbioh the journeyman journalist discovers in bitterness of spirit that currant cakes are more plentiful than current topics. Coriv bread when I'm hungry, Whisky whoa I'm dry. Greenbacks when I'm hard np. Heaven when I dte. See "Around the World" to-night. The girl who jumps tbe rope is a skip-tlcal creature. A doj oensus of Chester county sbows 1116 animals. Let Pennsylvania help the poor people in^iorth Dakota. Tyrone enjoyed "Aronnd the World in Eighty IJsya" last night. SritiKo poets are encouraged at Lancaster.   A literary society offers prizes. A.v exchange defines unspeakable an. guish as treading on a stutterer's corns. A colored man has been nominated for Burgess of Marietta. Tar. stenographer on the Chicago limited is kept very busy. To Bngland, to England, to buy me a lord; Home again, home again. Bringing a fraud. Shaffer's maj. 223 A Cold Wave, The cold wave signal floats from the flag staff on the Simon building to day. The temperaturo, scnording to news from the weather department will fall to 24 degrees by Thursday morning. PERSONAL   FKNCILINUg. II. R. Whitcomb is transacting business in Philipsburg to-day. P. M. Teats, the well known school furniture man is a F;illuii House gue^t to-day. Mr. and Mis. A J, Quigley and Mrs. .lacucH Crawford, visited yesterday with Mrs. Welch, at Mooscytown. Eddie Laird, Mcsseugcr for the Penn'ii Railroad Company In this city, is spending a few days with friends Id Williamspoit. The Election in Woodward. The following is tbe result of the election in Woodward township: Judgo of Election, R. F. Smith 133; Inspector, Daniel Myers, 07; William Clymor, 59; School Directors, A. W. Bolingor, 81; Samuol Probst, Jr., Ill; TliomasT. Bartholomew, 28; Auditors, William L. Allen, 68; Charles Kowoll, 55 William Hanna, 112; B. Mader, 1; Tax Colleotor, Frederick Probst, 112; Superjviaer, W. A. Hanna, 100; B. Mader, �4'j John Lanbshor. 13; Nathan McCloskey, 13; Overseer of tho Poor, Isaac A. Packer, 53; H. S. Boliuger, 00; Town Clerk, A. M. Smith 101. A Runaway Buy. This morning's Wilillamsport Qnzetleand liuUtUii says: JarooH,i,thu thirteen-year-old adopted son ol Martin Moran, of DuBois-town, disappeared laktt Friday and it is supposed ho ran aw'ayi The boy was Bent to Dr. Lumley to get |some medicine for Mr. Moran on Friday afternoon and, after crossing tho Maynard street bridge, no traoe of him can be found. ThiB is tbe second time tho boy has run away, but before he did not leave DuUoiatowu. HiB parents rro worried on bis account and any information concerning him will be gratatully leoeived either at the police station or his home. Tt� Vscstei, ICtuttt. County Survujor David and William Hay wout to Thrto Runs today where they will bo joined by John lluhn, Jr., and will there view a public road which it Ib proposed to vacate. The rood is abont six miles long. The garter must go. Some one has devised and introduced a stocking with a draw string that ties with an ornamental bow, buckle, or posy of silk flowers. Thank God i there is one man who never spoke a cross word to hia wife," said Sam Jones at an Omaha meeting the other ulght, as a round faced, good-natured man rose in response to Sam's question if such a person was present. The good-natured man smiled a bland smile and said: "I haven't any wife, I'm a bachelor 1" The two most -plentiful attiolee around town yesterday were election workers and mud. Dos't forget that you oan take Nellie Bly'strip around the world by going to the Opera House to-night. The "Around the World in Eighty Days" company which appears at the Opera House to-night comes to Look Haven recommended as n show clean and refined. The company numbers thirty-two people and twenty two ladies appear In tho ballet. Tbe show is one of a eharaoter that seldom visits our town, and doubtless those who are fond of nue scenery, handsome costumes and graceful movements will be present. On tailor-made dresaes the best Ivory buttors are used in dome, ball and fiat disks. They are smoky effects, and the blue buttons are as pretty as jewelry. The latest wedding caper is to have the bridegroom's presents published witb tbe bride's. It is English, and tends to stimulate gifts to tbe man. "Kiss me darling in the Spring," slags tbe sweet Normslite. She voices tbe melody so touahinply, but tbe songs appeal is for the future. What's the matter with doing it now old girl. Postponements are often fatal. Peanuts are being put on the society dinner-table, in place of roasted almonds. Tbey are shelled, of course, as it would be iuoonvient to place a waste-basket be I side each guest. WITH GREAT BRITAIN. The British  Extradition Treaty Ratified By the Senate. UB SWOIttt AT li.UNBOH'S. EMBEZZLEB8 SHUT OUT OF CANADA The New Arrangement CUasitles Under Kx-traditable Offenses, Manslaughter, Counterfeiting, Kmbezalement, Fraud, Perjury, and Various Other Minor Charges. Washington, Feb. 18.-The Senate baa ratified the British extradition treaty, with a few important amendments. Tbe treaty makes the following crimes extraditable in addition to those specified in tbe treaty of 1842. 1. Manslaughter 2. Counterfeiting or altering money or putting the same la circulation. 3. Embezzlement, laroenoy, obtaining money or goods under false pretenses or receiving the same knowing them to have been rongfully obtained. 4. Fraud by bailee, banker, agent, factor, trustee, director, or officer of any company made criminal by the laws of both countries. C. Perjury or subordination of perjury. - 6 Rape, abduction, ohild stealing, kidnapping. 7. Burglary. 8. Piracy by the law of nation*. 9. Mutiny at sea, wrongfully sinking or destroying a vessel or attempting to do so, assaults on the high seas; 10. Crimea and offenses against the laws of both countries; for the suppression of slavery and slave trading. Extradition is not to be had for politioal offences, nor shall any person sarrendeied by either party be tried for any offense than the one for which he was extradited. Tbat it shall not apply to any crimes committed before its ratification. During the discussion of tbe measure which lasted abont two hours, several efforts were made to amend it in important particulars, but these were not successful The principal points of attack were the sections including manslaughter and obtaining goods or money under false pretenses. Tbe amendments that were made are said to be of an unimportant character, and it is expected that they will be accepted by the British representative, without serious objections. Tbe discussion lasted two hours and two changes of importance were adopted by the Senate. Tbe word "voluntary" was inserted before manslaughter, thus limit ing the degree of that crime whieh is made extraditable. The paragraph ielating to the crime of obtaining money or goods under false pretenses was substantially modified, if not stricken oat. With these changes the treaty is said to have met the approval of tbe Democratic Senators, and the vote in its favor is understood to have been practically unanimous. Yesterday In Congress. Washington, Feb. 18.-The House considered the bill providing a temporary form of government for the territory of Oklahoma to-day, but adjourned without taking a vote on it Senator Blair's Educational bill again oooupied most of the time in the Senate to-day. Badly Punished. Bast Frakcisco, Feb. 18.-Jimmy Grif-feu, tbe St. Paul light weight, was defeated by Billy Maban, of this eity, in twenty-seven rounds, at the Occidental athletic club last night. The fight was fierce throughout. Griffon was badly punished; hia lips and nose were out and swollen, and bis body covered with blood. He fought a game battle, however, although Mahan forced the fighting nearly all tbe time. Griffen then made a savage attack in almost every round and made it uncomfortable for the San Francisco man. Griffen was knocked down half a dozen times in the last three rounds, bat struggled gamely to his feet until a terrific blow in tne jaw finally seat him to the floor. His head struck the boards beavily and he was picked up insensible. � �� �    -> Leather Factories to Close. Woburn, Mass., Feb. 18.-The members of the Manufacturer's Association at a meeting last night voted to oloee every leather factory represented in tbe association to-morrow and to keep tbem dosed until tbe men return to work at the factory of Beggs & Cobb. This means the enforced idleness of 1,500 men. The men at Beggs & Cobb's factory refuse to accept tbe rate of pay recently fixed by the arbitrators. Banquet at the Fallon House. Friday night tbe Grindstone club will banquet at the Fallon House. The banquet was to bare been given last November on Thanksgiving Day, bat was postponed on aooount of tbe illness of a number of the members. Thursday night LaFayette Chapter, No. 103, will have a supper at the Fallon House. Connt Andrnssey Ornil. Pesth, Feb. 18.-Count Julius An-drassy, the well known Hungarian statesman, who has been 111 for some time � Volosea, near Fiume, died^today, aged sixty-seven. ;!.-.; l' A Cari itm Story About 2>rceidontial�:lc<-'tiun Nhiht lu the White House. This story is from tho St. Louis Qlobe-Demoerat: "The Illinois Democrats propose to nominate John M. Palmer for United States Senator, and make a personal campaign, it is said. That is provocation for the narrative of au incident at the White House on Election night 1888. Mr. Cleveland and his Cabinet were gathered in tbe library, reading the returns as they were taken by au operator in tbe next room, Sir. Cleveland has never been accused of rainbow chasing. He is levelheaded when it comes to election-returns. He demonstrated tbat quality on this particular occasion. Enough had been received to show about what the city of New York and Kings county would do, "The President got up from his chair and began to walk the floor in a deliberate manner. Some figures came from the interior of New York State. One was from Roscoe Conkliog's old home, where, in 1884, there had been defection from Blaine sufficient to elect Cleveland. Tbe President took this return and compared it with tbe figures of four years before. He saw tbat Harrison had recovered the lost Republican vote in tbe interior of tbe State. He made a rapid calculation and said: " 'Gentlemen, we have lost.' Then he resumed hia paeing. Nobody spoke for a few moments. At length Postmaster-General Dickinson broke the silence. He said: " 'Mr. President, I am inclined to wait for further figures ; I don't by any means give up yet. We have beard nothing from Michigan, so far. Our prospects there are very bright, I can assure you, from personal information.' 'The President had halted as Mr. Dickinson began to speak. He listened until his Postmaster-General had finished, and without a word, he resumed his tramp across the room. In a few minutes a telegram from Detroit was banded in. It announced that Michigan bad gone Republican 'by the usual majority.' 'The oppressive silence which ensued was broken by Secretary of Agriculture Norman J. Coleman, of Misaourri, who, with cheerful optimism, argued: ' 'Wait till we bear from Illinois, Mr. President. I know something of the situation there. Tbe honest yeomanry are thoroughly aroused upon this issue of Tariff reform. General John M. Palmer bas made a gallant fight. I shall not give up bope until we have heard from Illinois.' "The President had stopped as Secretary Colman began to talk.  He heard him through and simply said as he resumed his march: "Oh,-!"' The County Fair. This is an affecting and vivid story of domestic joy and sorrow, of home life and rural scenes. It iB founded on the popular play of the same name, in which Neil Burgess, who is also the author of tbe story, has achieved the dramatis success of the season. The story is a faithful reproduction of the drama in the form of an extremely captivating romance, with tbe same unique characters, tbe same graphio scenes,.: hut with the narrative more artistically ronnd-ed, and completed than was possible in the brief limits of a dramatic representation. This touching story effectively demonstrates that it is possible to produce a novel which is at once wholesome and interesting in every part, without the introduction of an impure thought or suggestion. Street & Smith, 31 Rose street, New York, are the publishers, and the story, the price of wbiob is 25 cents, is in No. 33 of "The Select Series." 'An Ocular Delusion" is the title of a bright social study iu aerial shape, which will begin in the New York Ledger ol Marob 1. Tbe story holds the mirror up to club life in the metropolis, and touches lightly but with the masterly and suggestive stroke of the etching band, some of the more distinctive sides of New York society life. Several of the characters are so startlingly typical tbat they may be taken for any oue of scores of the members of the "Four Hundred." The hero is a fine combination of manliness, ready ingenuity and audacity, a youth with a rare amount of phosphorus in his cerebral gray matter and an equally generous amount of red corpuscles in bis veins-a character which the author bas elaborated witb sympathetic interest, and wbiob, according to tbe impression given by tbe advance sheets, represents au oarsman of a recent orew of a leading American college. Tho author, by the way, is that brilliant young newspaper worker, Frank Howard Howe, son of the late postmaster-general, Timothy F. Howe, of Wlseonsin. The Greeuville Progrea tells of a man whoeutered a poll it den there on Saturday night witb a mouth's wages aud lost every penny. His family were left without food. His wife in a fit of despondency took a dose of poison, and it was witb difficulty that her life was saved,   

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25 page views for 1 month Learn More

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
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  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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