Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: February 18, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - February 18, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                oettm EIGHTH YEAB-NO 298. LOCK HAVEN, PA., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS KINSLOE BKOTHKK8---prjuMSHltRS CURRENT COMMENT- Joskpu n. Choate'9 definition of a mugwump is "a man educated beyond his intellect." The definition is not far wrong. Victouia Wcoduull and Belva Look-wood will run (or I'resident in 1802. Fortunately tb� Presidency ia not contag ions. Mr. Cleveland is mill fighting the windmill of tariff reform. If be will lit still and hold bis chin, the Republicans will reform the tariff. There are sixteen million cows in the TJuited States. These, with the aid ol ibe pomps and hydrants ought to supply ns abundantly with the pare laoteous fluid. The Philadelphia fifties'expresses the wish that the English syndioate, which is anxious to buy everything American, would make an oiler for our political bosses, so that we might get rid of them. Oar political bosses are alwaya ready to sell themselves, and a deal in that direction would Dot be a hard one to effect. The Philadelphia Inquirer says the . white members of the Grand Army of the Republic in the Department of Mississippi and Louisiana have gone off by them-selves and formed a new organization, leaving the original field in possession of the colored members and those whites who are willing to associate with them, They have done this because the colored veterans were permitted to organize camps of the Order and to participate with the whites in the obsequies of Jefferson Davis. Meanwhile, in the G. A. R. Convention, just adjourned at Shamokin, colored members were received on terms of absolute equality with the white one, and nobody's feelings seemed to be hurt by it. Southern whites are making a great deal of trouble for themselves by their foolish Indulgence in race prejudice. The P. O. s. or A. Ball at Benovo. Benovo News. The ball in the Assembly Building given by the members of the P. O. S. of A., Friday night was one of the best atteoded and most social parties ever given by any organization in our midst. The oonoert from 8 to 9 o'clock was delightful to those who appreciate exoellent music and fine execution. Judging from the harmony of time and tone, each member of the orchestra is an artist, but the execution of John Hazel was the purest that an audience of this town ever had .the pleasure of bearing. Mr. Hazel's fame as a cornet soloist is world wide. Promptly at nine o'clock Grand Conductor, Mr. C. E. Miller, assisted by Miss Emma Goldsberry called for the assem bling for the grand march, when seventy-five men, each accompanied by a lady friend formed in line, and to the time of the music followed the graceful movements of the conductor. REEB STILL RULES. Progress of the Election. The election in the city is passing off quietly, and there is every indication that a large vote will be polled. Considerable cutting is being done, it is said, on both sides, and it will probably be late to-night before the result will be announced. Getting In Bound �oge. There are a number of rafts of round timber already on the banks of the river between this city and. Renovo. At one place six rafts were hauled to the river last week in five days and nights. Spring* Fever. The thermometor at 1 p. m. to-day marked 70 in the shade. There are a number of cases of spring fever reported but being of a mild type, a slight cool wave will effect a cure. PERSONAL   PKNCIXINQS. Hon. A. J. Quigley, of WiUiamsport, is in the city to-day. John Heokmau, 8r, of Porter township, is confined to the house by sickness. Miss Bessie Pomeroy, of Mill Hall, is visiting school friends in Shamokin. Mr. if. C. Reed, of Clintondale, who has been severely dealt with by the grip, is still confined to bis room. He is now slowly improving and hopes to be out soon. Congressman H. C. McCormick returned to his home in WiUiamsport last night and was met at the Park Hotel by a number of his friends. Walter McWilliams, Ouray, Colorado, is visiting friends in this city and vicinity. Mr. McWilliams was formerly a resident of Lock Haven. Mrs. Jobn EvanB will leave here to-morrow for Cumberland, Md., having been oalled there by the illness of her son George, who has typhoid fever. Mrs. J. H. Frank, who has been confined to her bed by sickness for the past six weeks, is now somewhat better and hopes are entertained for her speedy recovery to health and strength. Dr. S. S. McCormick, of Hubleraburg, who recently settled there, is securing a large practice. He ia well liked as a physician and gentleman. Dr. Ma, is a son of Hon. Shannon McCormick, of State College. Firmness on the Part of the Speaker Checks a Strong Outburst THE POINT OF HO QUORUM RAISED Trouble Over the World's Fair BUI, and the Clotl Cry of No Quo-ram-The Democrats Try a New Plan by Demanding Tellers, and Then .Dispute the Speaker's Bight to Count those Not Voting. Washington, Feb. 17.-After - the reading of the journal in the House to-day Mr. Carlisle rose and said that since the 29ih of January bis side of the House had been protesting every morning against the approval of the journal on the ground that it contained an entry made by direction of the Speaker showing the names of oertain members present and not voting. Last Friday the House had adopted a code of rules providing for such practice against the Democrats who had protested and wonld protest as an unconstitutional practice. Bat it was a question which eould not be decided in this House and whenever the proper cases arose it would go to some other forum. It was the purpose of bis side of the House to see that this occasion should be made in such a shape as would permit it to be finally and decisively passed upon. Therefore, he saw no reason why the journal form of which tba Honse bad a right to prescribe, shonld not be approved. This was done. a livelt debate. There was another parliamentary debate, the Democrats disputing the right of the Speaker to oonnt a quorum present when tbe vote by tellers showed less than a quorum. Mr. Candler, of Massachusetts, offered a resolution providing that Thursday and Friday next be set aside for debate on the World's Fair bill, and that tbe vote be taken on Monday. Mills, of Texas, demanded a second. Tellers were appointed and the result announoed as fo'lowe: Yeas, 114; nays, 8. On tbe point of no quorum the Speaker, after running his eye rapidly over tbe House Baid: "There are 172 members present, more than a quorum." McMullen, of Tennessee, immediately protested that the rules prescribed tellers as a means of ascertaining the presence or absence of a quorum, and it was not proper for the Speaker to count. the speaker's rOLICY. The Speaker responded that a majority bad eeoonded the motion and the debate was now in order, but the Democrats made an earnest resistance to proceeding further and Mills, Carlisle, Blount and Crisp argued tbatou a vote by the tellerauobody should be counted who did not actually vote, and the report of tbe tellees to the Speaker was the only guide be bad for as-serting whether or not a quorum participated. Their arrangements were opposed by Cannon, Lodge and Burrows, who up- I held the Speaker in his interpretation of the rules. authorities quoted. The Speaker made quite a lengthy address, citing bis authorities for determining the presence of a quorum, and saying In conclusion that in this case he had repeatedly oounted the Bouse during the vote and was satisfied that a constitutional quorum was present to do business. Messrs. Candler, Flower and Hill then spoke briefly, urging speedy action on the World's Fair bill. The question wsb then taken on the motion to suspend the rules and make a special order for the World's Fair bill, and this was agreed. The bill for the relief of the Sioux Indians at Devils Lake agency, North Dakota, who are represented to be starving, was then taken up on a suspension of the roles and passed.   Adjourned. in the senate. In the Senate to-day Mr. Freye, from tbe Select Committee on Pacific railroads, reported the bill providing for tbe funding of the Pacific railroad bonds, which was placed on the calendar. Senator Blair's educational aid bill was taken up and Blair resumed bis speech. Senate adjourned at 5 o'clock leaving bis argument sti'l unfinished. CL1STOS COUNTY finances No News of tbe Hissing firiu. New Yoke, Feb. 17-The National line steamship Egypt arrived at Loudon to-day from this port. She went over the course tbe Erin is supposed to have taken, but her captain has not cabled that he saw any traces of the missing ship. It is therefore taken for granted by tbe National line agents in this oity that he saw no sign of tho steamship. Tbe agents still hope for news of the Erin. She has been out for forty days. An Attempt to Burn Churches. Harrieburo, Feb. 17.-Last night" an incendiary tried to burn tbe Memorial United Bretbern church and tho Fourth Street Bethel of tbe Church of God, but their efforts were discovered la time to prevent serious damage. Monies Paid Into the State Treasury and Reeelveri �>J the County for Salaries, Etc. We are indebted to Auditor General Thomas M'Camant for a copy of his Report on tbe Finances of Pennsylvania for tbe year ending November 30, 1869, from which we gather the following statement of monies paid into the State Treasury from Clinton county and those reoeived for salaries, etc, in this oounty: PAID INTO STATE TREASURY-TAX ON COR' PORATION 8T0CK. Bald Eagle Boom Company..................3 3 75 Bald ISagle, NUtany.Brusu and Venn's Valley Turnpike Company.............-, 56 25 Beech Creek Improvement Company. 1 03 tireat Island Bridge Compaoy............. 39 40 Kettle Cceek Coat Hinging Company.. 145 00 Lock Haven (las Company.......;.......- 2U0 00 Lock Haven steam Heating Co............ 52 50 Lock Have" Bridge Company.............. tte 50 Kenovo Llfc""t, Heat and Power Co...... 'JO 00 TAX ON BANK STOCK. First National, Lock Haven................ 1,190 00 Stale Hank, Lock.Havon.................... 000 00 TAX ON NET EARNINGS. Bank of Benovo........................w.......... 34 05 TAX ON LOANS. City of Lock Haven............................... 610 36 Renovo Borough.................................... 142 50 County.......................................�,.......... 178 55 Lock Haven Hteam Heat Co................. 49 88 Tax on personal property.................___ 1180 20 Tux on writs, wills, deeds, ets............... HUB 80 Tax on collateral Inheritance............... 305 10 Tax on retail liquor licenses................ 2281 64 Tax on wholesale liquor licenses......... 1613 00 Tax on brewers licenses........................ 005 00 Tax ou bottlers licenses.................. ai5 00 Tax on retaHersllcenses........................ 1108 67 Tax on billiard licences......................... �!l 50 Tax on theatres, circuses, etc.............. 05 00 Pamphlet laws...................................... ID 15 BONUS ON CHARTERS. Clinton Democrat Publishing Co........ 8 75 Lock Haven clay Works.................... 28 13 South Benovo Water Company........... 2 25 KOTAltlES PUBLIC. ...........................       25 00 i 00 C. B. Qearhart................................... b. F. ueary......................................... Total..............................................S 12092 18 received from 9TATE treasurer. Hon. c. A. Mayer, President Judge...-I 41*11 50 W. Klpp Chestnut, Associate Judge...    741 00 J. W. Crawford. Associate Judge.........     GS2 50 Clinton Republican..............................      W 25 Benovo Record.......................................     108 75 F.A. Lank�...........................................     15 00 John W. Harris.....................................      11 9� D. M. Brungard.......................................   1000 00 Common bchools appropriation..........  10828 35 Central stale Normal bcnool aud to pnpllsaud graduates.-...................... 4SA4 00 Appropriation Tor building, etc......... 37500 00 Insurance on building burned............. 10000 00 Company H, National Guard............. 1039 13 Total.............................................I 71500 94 Haimali Thompson. Tho subject of this notice was born in New Berlin, Pa., Dec. IS, 1332. Her father, Dauici Lemon, was one of the old time Methodist, and his house a home for tbe preachers. Hannah, at an early age, embraoed religion, aud maintained her profession during life. She was married, April 24, 185G, to James T. Thompson, and two years later came with her husband to Salona, which bee .mo their permanent residence. Hero were born and nurtured seven children, five of whom, two sons and three daughters, survive. Here, she quietly and unobtrusively exemplified the conjugal and maternal virtues which made her home a happy one, and make her memory dear. For almost two years she had suffered from a bronchial affection; and last December, during a revival, having ventured to walk with ber husband to evening meeting, she took cold, and tbe visit to tbe house of prayer was her last out door trip. February 9, 1890, after seven weeks of severe suffering, it pleased God to release her from pain by a painless exit, which, though solon? imminent, came with startling suddenness at last. During her illness, ibis dear sister expressed deep regrer, not lor anything she had done, but that she had not done more; that she had not been more earnest and active in Christian work. But while humbly conscious ol uuworthiness, she trusted in the Sauior, and no one who knew her doubts that now being absent from the body she is present with the Lord. Her funeral servioe was bald in the Salona Methodist Cbaroh, Eeb. 12, 1890, by the pastor, assisted by Rev. H. A. Diettt-riob, pastor of the Lutheran Church. The text was I Cor. xv :2G. Her remains were laid In Cedar Hill cemetery to await tbe resurrection morning. Salona, Pa., Feb. 15, 1890.     .7 s. u. To-JHorrow Night's Attraction. At liar" in' Academy of Musio Jules Verne's "Around the World in Eighty Days" packed the house from parquet to ceiling, aud many were unable to obtain seats, Mr. W. J. Fleming, tbe original creator of the part of Pbileas Fogg in this country, and an artist well known in Baltimore, sustained that character. Arnold Wolfred was a chipper Passe-Partout, the servant; James P. Fleming was John Archibald, the American, and Harry Stoddard was Fix, tho detective; Aonda, the Rajah's widow, and Ayeesha were Misses Edith Potter and Cecil ReeB. The play is a great spectacular sensation, and a tro< mendous auxiliary and ballet corps are tbe extraordinary features of tbe play tbat help forward a "go" that went before and goes again with much sucoess, as tbe crowd of last night showed.-From the Baltimore .Sttn. of Oct. Slst. A Wrrck lit Young Woman's Creek. Last Saturday a wreck occurred on Oliver WoU's railroad near North Bend. Several cars loaded with prop timber broke loose and went flying down the grade until they collided with a lot of empty cars, a number of which were badly wrecked.  No person was injured. AS I0U LIKE 'EM. Breezy Items   Quickly   and  Oonectly Penciled by Our Roporter. LATEST HEWS ABOUT THE   OITY Wants a Turkey Dinner-Harvesting Ice- A Wrack at Young Woman's Creek-A Handsome Window-Death of a Child- Interesting Meetings-A Fine New Hons* -Spring Fever. W. Seely Hopkins, who will be hanged at Bellefonte on Thursday, insists tbat be will want  turkey dinner ou Thursday and the Sheriff Intends to give him one. Tbe dinner will be served at 9 o'clock. Hopkins' appetite is as good as a woods-mans, atd he does not display the least sign of fear. He sleeps sound at nights, and ia not at all nervous over the near approach of the day of his death. The procession from the jail to the scaffold will be begun immediately after the clock strikes the hour of ten and a very few minutes later the lifeless body of Hopkins will be dangling in the air. The body will be exposed to public view immediately after the execution in tbe jail hall. There will be a large uumber of persons admitted to tbe jail yard to witness the banging. Cots for the Hotels. Messera F. M. Ross and P. P. Kittman, bave made arrangements for a large number of cots which can be used by hotel keepers and others io providing sleeping accomodations for their guests during the meeting of the Grand Commandery, Knight Templars, in this eity next May. The cots are the best that can be procured, being woven wire Bpring, with all the neo-cessary clothing to enable a person to sleep warmly and comfortably. Harvesting Ice. The Pennsylvania Railroad Company is cutting ice on the mill pond of Hall, Saul & Co., at Beecbwood, Elk County. A force of men are working day and night cutting the ice which is about four aud a half inches thick. About live car loads a day is being stored in the company's ioe hoUBe at Renovo. Reading "The Tempest." The Shakespeare Club is now reading "Tbe Tempest." A number of new members have been elected to tbe club this season aud tbe meetings continue profitable and pleasurable in every sense of the word. The 20th of April ia tho great poet's birthday and it is likely that tbe club will celebrate tbe occasion. Death of a Child. Bessie A. Vanatta, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Vanatta, died last night, aged 13 months. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the family residence in Fiemington, at 2 p. m. Interment to be made at Fiemington cemetery. Blooming Chrysanthemums. The extraordinary pbenomen on of a bed of obrysantbemums blooming in midwinter may be seen at the residence of Josephus Shoemaker, West Main street. A bed of those plants in bis yard burst into bloom last Sunday and are a very pretty sight. A. Handsome Window. Tbe large front window in the Presby. terian Church at Mill Hall is a memorial window to Samuel McCormick, deceased, who gave the grounds. It is placed there by the generosity of Mrs. Judge Mayer, a daughter. It will be very handsome in design and coloring. Cominanderlea Cuming. Harrisburg Commandery and Kodasb Commandery, of Philadelphia, have recently been assigned hotel quarters during tbe Grand Conclave in May. Tbe former will be located at Keller's new hotel on Grove street and the latter at the Harmonioa Hotel, Jay street. Seeking a New Location.' The Alram Cox Stove Company, whose works at Lansdale, Pa., were recently destroyed by fire, will not, it is said, be rebuilt at that place. Lock Haven's Board of Trade ought to secure this industry if possible. The sjermanla Ball. To-night tbe Germanla Orchestra will discourse excellent musio for the dancers at their social dance to bo given in Scott's Bazar. Buy a ticket ao
                            

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication