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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: February 8, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - February 8, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                Mil til EIGHTH YEAR-NO. 290. LOCK HAVEN, PA., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS lONSLOK KKOTIIKUS � . FUI1MSHKK9 Kl/XNINO ON HI9 MKBITS, It is publicly acknowledged by tbe Dem. ocrats that Joseph GraGus, the Republican candidate for City Treasurer, has mide an excellent official and has coodacted the office in-a highly satisfactory manner for the past four years, to the people generally, irrespective of party. Oar eBteemed contemporary the Daily Democrat, even admits that "Mr, GraGus is a very gentlemanly aud obliging official, as well as an honest administrator of the office." Now that all agree as to bis capability for con ducting the affairs of the office, why should he not be retained fur another two years: Mr. Grifius is running oo bis merits and the fact of his being a candidate for the third time is nothing to his disoredit and the attempt fro make capital for his oppo nent on this point wit! fail. It is a high comjrlimeut to Mr. Grafius' past record that he secured the uomiuatiou of the liepublican City Convention for his third term aud the tax payers intend to re-elect him. When he took hold of the office city o rders were at a discount but now they are at par aud have beeu for some time. They are as good as any gilt-edged security at the banks and only a few days ago the First National Bank cashed over #800 worth of orders in one day. Such a thing as this was not done before Mr. Grafius took hold of tho office, unleBS the holder submitted to a heavy discount. This is only one of many reasons that can be enumerated for keeping an official like this in offiee. It ie to the interest of the tax payers to keep him there; the best interests of tho city will be subserved by reelecting him and it is the duty of all good citizens, who have the welfare of the city at heart, to vote for Joseph Grafius. CURRENT COMMENT. It seems that Speaker Reed was right; at least the Democrats are left. Speaker Reed has a backbone made of American iron which is protected by tbe admiration of his fellow citizens. Mr. Mills thinks the majority should rule only when it is Democratic; but then, Mr. Mills never thinks real thoughts. Centre county has not inflicted capital punishment since 1818, but unless all signB fail, she wil! make op for lost time tbiB year. Nellie Blt will lecture. This disapproves tbe theory that there is anything extraordinary about the young lady. Nellie is only human, Wuex Mrs. Cleveland was in tte White House she was treated with tho greatest courtesy by tbe Republican press. In marked contrast is tbe treatment of Mrs. Harrison by the Democratic newspapers, to their shame it must be said. It is authoritatively stated that Robert E. Pattison will take the Democratic nomination if it Is tendered him. He is tbe strongest candidate tbe Democracy could nominate and in the event of the forced nomination of an unpopular candidate by the Republicans be would have a good fightiDg chance to win. No wonder Englishmen are shocked by the frivolous character of our American newspapers. A New York journal depicted the august nine of the United States Supreme Court as a negro minstrfcl company in the first part and printed beneath a Supreme Court song and dance. When such liberties can be taken with our solemn Judges what becomes of national dignity ? Geouge W. Ciiilds and A. J Drexel, of Philadelphia have started a fund for Samuel J. Randall, the veteran Congressman, which now reaches the comfortable proportions of $50,000. His seriously impaired physical condition, which excites the gravest fears of his friends, will make this fund a grateful contribution Mr. Randall's long public service entitles him to sucb recognition from bis neighbors, who know him to be a poor man, and tbe fact that be has never accepted gifts of any kind during bis career, or even contributions to his campaign expenses, makes this movement specially meritorious.        _ The Democrat intimates that the prominent Democrats mentioned by the Express as mistaking Mr. John J. Shaffer as their candidate for City Treasurer were Republicans, if Maj. John Wynne, the President of tbe recent Democratic Convention that nominated a City Treasurer, and A. W. McCormick. Esq., the recent Chairman of tho Democratic City Committee are Republicans, tbe public, as well as tbe Express, will be astonished to hear it. And yet both these gentlemen thought tbat John J. Shaffer, a staunch Republican for years, was the Democratic candidate for City Treasurer. Although John J. Shaffer ib not a candidate for City Treasurer, Jo>epb Grafius in, and Messrs. Wynne and McCormick will do themselves honor by casting their ballot for him on tbe lSth iust. His record as an honest and faithful official stands out so J clear and prominent that no man can jnake a mistake by voting for him, I WHO, SNOW AND SLEET The Gale Leaves Death and Destruction in Its Wake. BIG GLASS FA0T0BY DEMOLISHED Two Members of the Company Killed by Uw Walls-Tbe Worst Storm Known for Tears Races Throocbout tbe Western Fart of the State-Ralfrosd* Blockaded and Wires Leveled. PiTTsnuno, Feb. 7.-A heavy snow and sleet storm began here shortly before noon, and the ground is now covered with several inches of snow and bail. This 1b tbe first sdow fall of the winter. So far the sleet has not seriously interfered with tbe telegraph service. The old National locomotive works at Counellsville were blown down, and a number of smaller buildings demolished but no one was injured. It was the worst mountain storm known in years. a ItAOING BLIZZARD. PmsBtnti, Feb.7.-The worst storm for years has been raging throughout western Pennsylvania since noon to day, Snow, hail, rain and wind have been playing havoc. In this city tbe snow bas blockaded many of the streets and stopped traffic, while telegraph and telephone lines are breaking down under the heavy weight of ice with which they are coated. Id the mountains the storm is raging with terrific fury* and reports are coming in of serious damage to property. GLASS FACTORY DEMOLISHED. At Blairsville the large glass factory was demolished by the wind. The roof was blown off and tbe side walls facing east fell in. Charles E. Barr, general manager, and Mr. Barney, one of the firm, were instantly killed, and a workman whose name could not be learned, injured. Burney's body was immediately taken from the wreak. It was mangled beyond recognition. - Barr's remains were recovered two hours later. At Uniontown, Pa , the roof was blown off the Methodist Episcopal church, a part of it alighting on the house of John Brown, just north of the church, crushing it to pieces. The roof of a large new building lately erected by the Pennsylvania Construetion Company below town was also blown off, A horse and wagon driven by James Rush, was blown over Gray's hill. The wagon is lying on its back with tbe wheels whirling la the air. No one was seriously hurt. ge.veral destruction. Postmaster Baker's new house was nearly demolished, alBO James Frankenberry's house and John W. Ringer's bouse was leveled. Tbe telephone and electric light wires are all down. None of the coke works are running south of Uniontown. The Red Stone Coke Company's offices at Brownfield were blown down and entirely demolished. The end was blown out of tbe engine bouse at Leitb, and Warren's glass works were wrecked. The roof of the Lutberau Church was also blown off. At Connellsville the storm began in the morning and did not subside until laia this evening. J. M. Berpeck's house and store was completely wrecked, the inmates having a narrow eacape from death. Tbe Catholic Church is in a dangerous condition, and a number of other houses in the town are wrecked. HEAVY SNOW FALL. At Dunbar the Knights of Labor hall was entirely blown away. A report from Letsenring sajs all the large shafts of tbe H. C. Fiick Coke Company are down. The snow fall is from six to ten inches in depth. SKOW AND SLIDES," Asulani>, Ore., Feb. 7.-The extent of the damage done by tbe late rains to the Oregon and California railroad between here and Roseburg, 150 miles north of here, cannot be estimated even approximately, but Is very heavy. Tbe railroad from Grant's Pass to Blosaburg is reported oue continuation of slides. Tbe streams all over Southern Oregon are reported as high, if not higher than in 1861. A report reached here late last night from Glendale of an immense slide on the railroad half a mile south of the West Fork in Cow Creek Canyon. The slide came from a high mountain down to the bottom of tbe canyon, a distance of 800 or 1,000 feet, covering tbe track and filling tbe canyon. The report says they arc standing on the slide the same as tbey were when it started from the summit. Tbe water, backed up in tbe canyon for a distance of three miles, is 500 feet wide and from 50 to 75 feet deep. Tunnel Three is completely buried in water. Tbe creek is trying to cut through tho slide, but tho earth is jammmed in so tight tbat bo far it has not given way. Telegraph linemen built a rafc yesterday and will try to act a lino across the lake that has been formed. TUK OIRL WHO IlINTa. Most Hen  Know   the    Little   Charmers to Thutr Borrow. New York Tribune. Naturally you didn't mk him, and yon would be very indignant indeed if anybody suggested that you bad forced the poor fellow into bringing you flowers, candy, or taking yon to the concert. No, you didn't ask him but yon couldn't have been any clearer about it thau you were when you looked into his eyes in your most beseech!n? way and told him how anxious yoo. were to hear the great violinist, how BWeet you thought violets, and you did wish for a pound of chocolate. He didn't want to get any of these, he hadn't tbe money to spend for them; he doacn't get a very big Balary, he is trying to keep himself out of dept, and yet, be-oause he is generous and can't resist a pretty girl you have forced him into a dishonest position. That's it, in plain English. When tbe end of tbe week comes around he is $10 short in his money, a little bit on his board bill must wait, his laundress cannot be attended to, and the money that should go home must be apologized for. This is his first step towards not doing his duty and you have made him take it. The American man is generous, and when he has tbe money he wilt invite you himself without you suggesting to him what you like, or what you think be ought to do. Besides the barm you do him, you are making yourself vulgar. He bas a perfect right to go away and say that he doesn't want to visit your house any more, because you hint and hint until he has to take you to some place of amusement, or make you presents, and that, for his part, ho cannot afford it. Continue as you are doing and after a while you will get the reputation among men of being a very undesirable girl to know, and certainly no man who has beard of your reputation to "get things out of men," will want to ask you to be his wife. Better stay at home forever than go self invited; better never smoll a violet or a rose, than rorgefc, in your search for them, tbat it is tbe modesty of tbe violet and tbe digDity of ibe rose that makes thee pre-emioent among the flowers. Attend to It To Day. Ha n't you better pay tbat gas bill today ? Yon might forget it Monday and thereby forfeit tbe 20 per cent, discount. It is worth looking after. A Father*! Tribute. Dr. A. N. Baub, in a recent number of his paper the Educational Nexes, editiorially pays the following beautiful tribute to the memory of his daughter, the late Mrs. James W. Brown: 'This was his first born, a bright, cheerful, bappyyongu woman of twenty-eight, active and vigorous in both body and mind a bride of but thirteen months, but, now, alas! stricken down in the perils of childbirth and already consigned to the tomb to sleep the sleep that koowsno waking. The editor's sorrow, inexpressible in words, must be his excuse for transferring the editorial work of th� weekiTto other hands. May God, in His infinite goodness, have pity on him and all others on whom this sad bereavement falls! Sympathy from all sources has poured from overflowing hearts, and only those who have felt its healing balm can understand the gratitude of mourning friends in this bitter hour of trial." Judge Linn's Condition. Tbe Williamsport Sua of yesterday says: Tbe case of Judge Samuel Linn Is assuming a peculiar form which is puzzling tho doctors. He appears In good health, but as for walking or using his limbs, he has little control over thBm. Judge Linn has now been confined to his room continuously for seven months. PERSONAL    FKMJMNOS. Capt. P. D. Bricker, of Jersey Shore, is transacting business in Lock Haven to-day. Air. and Mrs. Horace Good, of Aurora, Nebraska, are visiting relatives in this city. W. C. Black has resigned bis position as clerk at the Renovo Hotel and is now io this city. C. F. D*tesman, who is now a traveling salesman, is home to spend Sunday with his family Dr. R. Armstrong and wife left this morning fur Philadelphia, where they ex-pact to spend some time. Adjutant General Hastings spent yesterday in Belief on te on his way to Johnstown, where be is to have a recoption today. Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Glenn left this morning for Asbiaud, Pa , to spend Sunday as tho guests of Rev. KobinB, a former pastor of tbe M. E. church at Renovo. Miss-Anoio Kaso, of Sun bury, who is visiting Misses Bertie Mader and Mame Israel, of this city, spent Thursday with these ladieB in Williamsport, All three were tho guufcts of Miss Sade Up-degratl, of Wost 4(.h street. Mih* Lulu Allahacb, who for some time bas been Deputy County Treaaurer, waB last nisbt elected by the City School Board teacher of the B Primary school in the Third ward to fill tbe vacaucy caused by the resignation of Mrs. John A. Hoover. nee Miss Annie Evans. TOLD BY REPORTERS. THE  FOI-E'S   PRICELESS RING. All tbe Latest.Local Events Hp to 2:30 P. M. Told in a Concise Manner. LATEST NEWS ABOUT THE   0ITY Regular Monthly Mectlnc or the City School Board Held Last Night-A den-nine Snow Storm-Forcy Still Lives-Of Coarse Tbey Will-Looking;For Accommodations. At the regular monthly meeting of the City Sohool Board last night the members present were Bridgeus, Gould, Klapp, Morlock, Martin, Welliver and Michaels. The Finance Comruittte reported the follow ing bills for which orders were granted: S. C. Leiter & Co., 90o; J. B. G. Kinsloe, $28 70; F. Fickensher, $2.30; Joseph Candor, |5.02; O. B. Love, $7 50; Steam Heat Co., $50.00; B. F. Brown, $7.50. The matter of refunding bonds to the value of $7,000 coming due next month was discussed, and tbe Board decidod to refund tbe bonds at four per cent, interest, and to issue the new bonds in denominations of $100 and $500. Tbe Finance Committee was empowered to procure bonds, and the President and Secretary authorized to execute them. The claim of L. C. Paoker for exoneration on $50 valuation was awarded. The claims of James ^Sullivan, Michael Croak and D. IT. Shaffer were reduced to $50 valuation and allowed. The Treasurers report was received and riled. City Superintendent Robb reported that over 85 per cent, of the pupils enrolled were now in attendance. He also reported Miss Henry, oue of the teachers, as being sick and unable to teach. The resignation of Miss Annie Eraus, a teacher of the B primary in the Third ward building was accepted, and ou motion of Mr. Welliver Miss Lulu Allabach was elected to fill the vacancy. Tbe Building and Repair Committee was authorized to have electric bells placed in the Third Ward school building. A Genuilie Snow Starn. The first genuine snow storm of tbe season began yesterday shortly after noon, and continued all the afternoon. The wind blew keen and biting from the northeast, and as tbe feathery particles descended and covered the ground everybody was in the best of spirits over the prospects of sleighing, and an opportunity for the lumbermen to get the log crop on the banks of the streams. About nine o'clook sleighs made their appea^auce on the streets, and tbe merry jingle of tbe bells made music that was sweet to tbe ears of all who heard it. Later in the night the snow changed to rain, and tbe mercury went up to a degree not at ail winter like. A telephone message to tho Express from Clearfield says tbat snow felt there to the depth of four inches. If a cold wave follows the storm tbe lumbermen will make good use of what snow there is, and will work day and night while it lasts, Forcey Still Live*. John Fnjcey, the man who was stabbed at Gillantown, Centre county, Thursday night, is still living but is in a precarious condition. Veihdoffer plunged his knife into Foicey's body twice. The first timo he struck him in tho back, cutting him fearfully. Ho then struck him on the left side,"tsjd the cut extends entirely across the abdomen from tbe left to the right side. The left lung was almost cut off. Both tbe men are youog and unmarried, and neither of them had been driuking. Looking for Accommodation!. Theodore Dorublaser is now iu Allen-town looking for hotel accommodations for Crescent Commandery, Knights of the Golden Eagle, during tbe meeting of the Graud Commandery. The Golden Eagles from this city will go in a body, fully determined to seoure tbe next meeting in this city if possible. SUNDAY  8KRTICK9, Services at the Disciple church at the usual bours. At tbe Water street German Lutheran Church services at the usual hours. San-day School at 2 p. m. Services at the Reformed church tomorrow morning and evening at tbe usual hours.   Sunday school at 0:30 a. m. Services at the Baptist Church in tbe morning at 10:30 a. m. Sunday Sohool at 2:15 p. m.   No services in the evening. Preaching at the East Main street M. E. Church In tho morning at 10:30. Sunday School at 9 o'clock. Preaching at Flem ington in the evening. At Trtuity M. E. Church-preaching at 10:30 a. m. and at T p. m., by tho pastor. Sunday School at 2 p. m. Young Peoples' Society of Christian Endeavor at 0 p. m. At the English Lutheran Chm-ob.- preaching by tbe pastor, at 10:30 a. m. and 7 p. m. Sunday School at 2 o'clock p. m., and Toung Peoples' Prayer meet* Ing at G;15 p. m. How the Contly Jew�l Cmno iuto the Utimli of St. Louis Stan. Rev. Father Phelan, says the at. Louis Republic, bas io bis possession tbe ring tbat ouce graced the finger of Pope Pius IX. Tbe ring is now tbe property of Mr. Robert Baguall, of St. Louis, who accompanied Father Phelan on his recent trip to the Eternal City. Father Phelan yesterday told a reporter hoTT Mr, Bagnall acquired this, in Catholic eyes, priceless relic. The late Pope directed that upon his death all his possessions, even down to bis jewels aud clothing, be eold at public auction, and the proceeds be given to the poor. In the face of spirited bidding from the College of Cardinals, a wealthy Roman lady secured the ring. At tho time Father Phelan and Mr. Bagnall were in Rome this lady, beiug then in greatly reduced circumstances, made overtures to them through a third party for tbe sale of the riDg. The lady's ofler was gladly accepted, and Mr. Bagnall becan.e the pui chaser of tho jewel at a round sum. Father Phelao satisfied himself that it was the pontifical ring from the assurance of Mgr. Ricoi, major domo for Pope Pius IX, now Cardinal Ricci. An accurate description of the ring is well-nigh impossible within the limits of this article. It is a massive seal ring, with an exquisite emerald setting, surrounded by 102 smaller stones, diamonds, sapphires, pearls and rubies. Aside from its sacred associations the ring possesses an intrinsic value of many thousands of dollars. Surrounding the emerald are twenty-six pearls, extending around tho sides are twenty diamonds, on each side of the emerald is a small solitaire surrounded by brilliants; on the corner facets of tbe seal are twenty-four stones, following the same arrangement, being set io triangular form; below the double row of diamonds on each side appears a ruby and two sapphires. Tbe entire arrangement is in perfect artistic taste, and the jewel is worthy a place in a royal collection. The workmanship on this ring is estimated at $1,500, and the emerald is worth $2,000 at the lowest valuation, Mr. Bagnall and Father Phelan are justly proud that this priceless jewel has found a place in this country, but they bad some difficulty in koeping it, for, when a high church official obtained a glimpse of it, demand was at once made that it be not allowed to be taken out of the country. Archbishop Croke was almost inconsolable when be learned that he could not keep the treasure, in his beloved Ireland. February Floral Hints. At this season everything begins to tbink of spring, and the plants in your window will start into new aud vigorous growth if given half a chance. Stir the soil in the pots. Give them all the sunshine possible, and as much fresh air as can safely be admitted. Shower them daily, and see tbat no insects are allowed to collect and work on tbe new shoots. Give a watering with liquid manure ouce a week at least,- twice is better,-to all that are making new wood, and repot those needing more room for tboir roots. It is quite important that tbis attention should be given now, as a shift later ou will interfere with the growth of the plant for a time, and everything calculated to check its steady development should be avoided. Do what is necessary before the plant gets much of a start. Bring up your Fuchsias from the cellar and repot them, cutting the old branches back at least half, if that was not done when you put tbeta away in tbe fall. Give plenty of water, a good light, and a rich, well-drained soil. Tbey will soon break freely all over the old wood, and by March they will be covered with uew shoots aud healthy foliage. Those who persist in keeping their Fuchsias in the living-room all winter know very little of what this plant is capable of doing if given a complete rest for three or four mouths. After such a rest it will mako an astonishing growth in a short time, and be loaded down with flowers, a good share of the summer and fall; but if kept iu tbe light aud heat all winter it will grow tall and spindling, and be weak, and give but few blossoms.-Eren E. Rex ford, in Ladies Home Journal. Church Supiier. The members aud frieuds of the Presbyterian Church will give a su;.per at the Cedar Springs sohool house on Saturday evening, February 15ih. Oysters, ice cream, cake and all tbe delicacies of tho season will bo served. Proceeds to be applied to tbe church furnishing fund. Let everybody tbat can do so attend. Invitation Extended. Rev. G. W. Gerhard has extended an invitation to Company II to attend a speoial service in the Reformed Church on Sunday evening, February 2'ici. Tbe company tins accepted tho invitation a'id will attend in a body. Protracted Mui'ting ut FluuliiRlon. Rev. S. B. Evans will begin a protracted meeting ut Flemingtou Sunday evening. Tbe meeting will be continued for some time. ESCAPADE OF A PRINCE The Duke D'Orleaiis Lands on French Soil and is Arrested, VIOLATION OF THE EXPULSION LAW An Unsuccessful Imitation of the Coup d' Etat of Napoleon III-The Would be Kins of the French Falls Into the ClatcheB of the Military Authorities and Stay Have Serious Trouble. Pabis, Feb. 7.-By prompt action the government to-day nipped in tbe bud what was apparently intended to be a royalist coup d'etat, modeled after Louis Napoleon's mad desceut upon Boulogne, and the ooly consequence is that the Duke of Orleans, eldest son of the Count of Paris, is to-night in custody. Tho Duke arrived in Paris to-day bearing a letter written and signed by the Count d' Paris announcing to tbe faithful and to all others the Count's abdication. He also had with him a manifesto addressed to the people of France nominally, and accord, ing to tbe theory of tbe pretenders a pretender is always a king, and therefore the Count of Paris abdicates the throne he never possessed. He consequently abdicates his claims as a pretender and in vir-tue of this abdication all his claims, rights and titles descend to his oldest, son. the young pketendeb. The young gentleman now in the hands of the authorities is Philippe Loaia Robert, Duke d'Orleans. This gentleman is therefore not merely one of the many vagrant princes, but the actual pretender to the throne in virtue of bis claims as heir of Louis Philiippe, and also as the heir of the old Bourbon line. His coming into tbe country in violation of tbe law banishing all the heads and direct heirs of the reigning families is a rash escapade, if it stands alone. Tbe fact that be was equipped with an appeal to tbe nation shows his intentions and may make the escapade serioas for him, if it should be developed that the movement is made in virtue of an understanding with tbe partisans of the Monarchy in Prance, It may be more than a violation by tbe laws of expulsion. There is some reason to believe that th3 movement is made in concert with the more determined opponents of tbe Republic, as the Duke repaired immediately to the House of Duke De Luynes, the present head of a family that has always adhered with an. compromising heroism to the old Monarchy. In tbat house he was King of France in theory, the descendant of Henry IV, and not merely the descendant of Louis Phillippi. On February 5 the Duke of Orloans attained the age of 21. the youno mas? abbaiqned. After arrest be was taken to the prefecture of police, where his identity was fixed beyond all doubt, and where the process verbal of bis violation of the law of banigbment was drawn up. In tbe afternoon he was arraigued before the military authorities. In response to an nquiry as to the objects and purposes of Lis visit to Franoe, he said that having attained hiB majority be bad come to France to place hiro6elf at the disposal of tho military authorities. This dash of audacity is regarded as a very happy stroke,aud is sure to make friends for him, but it did not touch the sensibilities of the authorities, and tbe Minister of the Interior ordered that tho Duke be held in ous-tody. Tbe further disposition of the oase will of course depend upon whether it is discovered that there wan any plot for a general royalist movement behind tbis incident. a question ok tdk people. Everybody in Paris remembers that the Royalists of France were at a given moment ready to rise, but that Henry V., obstinate, would not face the peril of placing himself at tbe head. The people are now' asking themselves the question whether tbe young Prince bas now come into tbe land of bis fathers in response to a similar invitation. This is the only view in which tbe oase bas a serious face. Aside from this it seems only a mad boyish prank. Not One Iu Ten Of tho people you meet from day to day has perfectly pure, healthy blood. Tbe hereditary scrofulous taint afflicts tho large majority of people, while many others acquire diseases from' impure air, improper food and wrong indulgences. Uence the imperative neoessity for a reliable blood purifier like Hood's Sarsapa-rilla, which eradicates every impurity, and gives to tbe blood vitality and health. It cures scrofula, salt rheum, humors, boils, pimples, and all other affections caused by impurities or poisonous germs in tho blood. All that is asked for Hood's Sarsiparilla is that it bo given a fair trial. CHAT   BY  TIIK   WAY. The Juniata Cauiiimeetlng. ' Tbe directors of tho Juniata Valley Canipnieetiug Association have decided to sink an artesian well on the grounds; also that tbe campmeeticg shall open August 10th and continue ten days. Items of Local and General Interest Gathered by Our Reporters. iiR shivered as from fearful cold. Because of her frigidity. For she said "No," and stuck to it With womanly rigidity. " 'Tis strange," said he, "that with this chill i suddenly am smitten; Tis paradoxical, but true- � No warmth is in her mitten." Kitiie Rhoades will close a sucooasful week's business in Milton to-night. Minnie-"What made you speak to tbat poor beggar to sharply? Perhaps she was really deserving of help." Mamie- "Maybe she was, but she interrupted me just as I was having a good ory over tbe poor girl in my novel dying on the rich man's doorsteep." A music binder was left at Satterlee & Fox's grocery store sometime ago. Tbe owner will please call and claim it. When a husband bas an iron will the quickest way for bis wife to break it is to rust it first with eye water. The real autocrat of the breakfast table wears a big apron, carries a tray and doesn't bring in tbe coffee till he gets good and ready. "Jess the Romp" at tbe Opera House Monday ngbt by tbe Eittie Rhoades company. Admission 10, 30 and 30 cents. Secure seats at Clark's. John E. DuBois, tbe millionaire lumberman, pays out about (13,000 oaoh monthly pay day. Look out for that handsome valentine. Nine out of ten girls in the average cooking class would spnrn a proposal from a man who expeoted them to do their own oooking. If it could only be attired in pink tights and given a wand, what a first-rate all-around artist the phonograph would make for the variety stage! Nellie Bly's monkey is now discounted by Sarah Bernbardt's two pet alligators. Kind words are like bald heads-they can never dye. "The February born shall rind  . - Slnoerlty and peace of mind. Freedom from passion and from care If they the amethyst will wear." A fashion expert says jewels should not be worn with tea gowns. Many of the school children already have long lists of words made from the name of "Kittie Rhoades" with the hopes of securing one of the watches to be given to the boy and girl securing thg greatest number. Lists to be handed in at tbe matinee next Saturday afternoon. Stem green and asparagus are new shades in spring dress stuffs. Polka dota on neokwear are . being looked down upon as slightly fogy. "Is Miss Blank teaching musio?" "Yes, bnt we call her 'Experience.'"   "Wbyf" Beoause she is a dear teaoher." Which would you rather do, wear out or rust out? When you come to think of it, wbo is any particular "Mrs," except that aha is tbe wife of her husband? Some beautiful flowers in the windows about the city. Base ball clubs and consumptives are flocking to Florida. Can't complain just now about the price of eggs. V/hen Adam first looked upon Eve as she sat 'Neath the boughs of a beautiful tree. He Bmlled ou hsr sweetly and lifted his hat, Aud "Madam, I'm Adam," said he. Alteh all the Harrisborg oar works have not been sold to the English syndi- . oate. Spring goods are already being reoelved and displayed by our merchants. "Afteb Dahk," a very ordinary show, drew an overflowing house at Allentown last week. Ou Tuesday evening "Richard III" was played to empty seats. The Allentown papers says that Richard isn't himself without a tank or beer keg scene. Havingi been mentally unbalanced by her husband's death, Marry < Ossman, of Pittsburg, keeps orape on the door-bell all the time. Why is it easy to get in an old man's bouse? Beoause bis gait is broken and his looks are few. Some remarkable pictures have been discovered on a rock on tbe Rio Grande, in Texas. They were painted by the Indians and represent a series of battles between the txibeB. PnoTOOiUPUic note-"A man may smile and smile and be a villian." This probably aocounts for the existence of,, so many vilHnous pictures of persons who have been told to look pleasant. Society discipline for the true woman is often the hardest of all kind to endure.   

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Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
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  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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