Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: February 7, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - February 7, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                EIGHTH YEAR-NO. 289. LOCK HAVEN, PA., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1890. ri�ICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS KIN SLOE BKOTHKKS - - - FUBLISHEK8 STAND BT THE TICKET. Tbeio teems to boa disposition on the part of some of too First ward R-'publi. oans to oppose several of the candidates noruiuated at the late primaries oo account of personal prejudices, growing out of the fact that their favorites were not nominated. Such actioD, if canied into execution, would result disastrously to the party candidates, ana be of no benefit whatever to those Becking their defeat. It will 09 remembered that a large percent' ago of the Republican vote was polled at the primaries last 6atin day night, and the result was a decided majority for all the caudidates nominated; thus they are entitled to the support of the party at the polls on the 18ih inst. All good citizens are Interested in our municipal government, and it behooves the Republicans to try and elect the wnolo ticket. The can didates nominated for the various offices in the First ward aro all ezctlient men, familiar with the duties connected therewith, and will represent their constituents in a creditable manner. The Republicans have a safe majority in that ward, and all that is necessary is '.o maintain the party orgauizitiou aud it will be an easy matter to elect the whole ticket. Let ibe members of the party freely submit to the will of the majority as expressed at the primaries and stand by the ticket, liumember there were nearly 200 votes polled in making these selections, whiob certainly gives a f&tr and full expression of the sentiment of the Republicans of the First ward. There is nothing to be gained by turning our local offices over to the Democrats just because a few are dissatisfied with the choice of a nominee, and because their favorite did not have votes enough to secure the nomination. Stand by the ticket as nominated, and the whole of it can be elected, both in oity and ward offices. CURRENT COMMENT. It begins to look as if Thomas B. Reed had placed himself at the head of the Republican party. The old scheme of connecting Europe and Asia by railway via Constantinople has heen revived, and, if carried to completion, will do more toward changing the map of Europe than hostile armies could. Berlin is a city about the size of New York, and last month seventy of her citizens committed suicide. That is at the rate of more than two a day or 840 in a year. With all her wickedness, New York can't come up to that. Buffalo Bill is going to Btrike theRo' mans for the use of the Colliseum for his Wild West show at Rome. Just think of his Indians, cowboys, bison, broncos and long horn cattle filling the place of the giadiators and the Hods and the tigers antiquity. A Pittsburg plate glass company made nearly a million dollars of profit last year and paid a thirty-five per cent, dividend. "We see no reason to howl against the tariff in all this, but only a most excellent opportunity for other of our citizens to go and engage in a most profitable business. The New York Tribune voices the true situation bj saying: "According to the Democratic party, it is not revolutionary to make war on the United States Sag and bear arms for four years against it, but it is revolutionary for the Speaker of Congress to rule that a member in his seat is present. The dreadful accident which bereft the home of Secretary Tracy of tbe wife and mother aud of a daughter attracts universal sympathy. This accident, with the repeated bereavements in the family of Secretary Blaine, will throw a gloom over Washington society which will not be lifted during the winter. ms from wasrigtoh The proprietors of the Now York Ledger eeut Mr. John G. Whittier a cteck for a thousand dollars for a poem written for that paper by the venerable poet, now eighty-two years old. Tbe poem la a pretty long one, it is true, about a column, but then a thousand dollars per column Is pretty good pay, especially when earned by a man far beyond his eightieth year. The "Record Butter," 050 pounds of whiob are wold every week in the Philadelphia market, has attained qaite a reputation. It itt mado on tbe Record farms in Montgomery county, owned by William M. SiDgerly, and it 1b Haiti that "tbe spinning of the two DeLavel Separators in the Creamery elicits expressions of pleasure from the average farmer on witnessing their operation. Like a pair of tops they whirl away at the rate of 7,000 revolutions per minute, and so perfectly are they balanced that their motion isalmoBt noiseless, and the apparently mysterious separation of the luscious cream from tbe skim milk is beautiful to behold." Senator Morrell Reports a Substitute Pension Bill Which is Promptly Passed. THE NEW 00DE OF BTJLES REPORTED The most sedate people love to get into mischief when they are certain of not being discoverek. Providing For a Provisional Government For Oklabomm-DiKOHlon of tbe Samoan THttty by tbe Senate In Executive 8M* �laa-OCb�r WMhlDf ton I^ewt-Cleveland at Gvneva. Washington, Feb. 6.-The new code of rules of the House were reported to-day and ordered printed and recommitted. The bill providing clerks for members was reported favorably, and was ordered printed and recommitted. Mr. Morrill, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, reported back the Senate bill to increase the pensions of certain soldiers, sailors and mannes, with a substitute providing that all who have since Jane, 1880, or may hereafter become so helpless from injuries received or diseases contracted in the service as to require the constant attendance of another person, shall receive 172 a month pension. A person unable to work and requiring tbe partial attendance of another person, shall receive a pension of $50. Tbe substitute was agreed to and passed. A bill was passed for tbe relief of the survivors of the Trenton, Vandalia and Nipslo, wrecked at Samoa.   Adjourned. in the ben ate. The Senate to-day discussed tbe scheme for a provisional government for the territory of Oklahoma. Senator Blair continued his speech in advocacy of his educational bill.   Adjourned until Monday. The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Blanche K, Bruce, to be the Re corder of Deeds for tbe District of Columbia. the samoan treaty, An executive session of the Senate was held this afternoon on motion of Senator Sherman, who desired to close the record upon the ratification of the Samoan treaty. After sundry confirmations had been disposed of the motion of Senator Edmunds to reoonsider the vote of Tuesday by whiob the treaty was ratified was called up aud laid on the table by a vote of 39 to 13, as was also the Edmunds resolution declaring the sense of the Senate upon tbe rights of tbe United States to the harbor of Pago Pago under the treaty of 1878, to be that those rights are not disturbed by the Berlin treaty of 1889. Thereupon Edmunds, who is the second member of the aommittee, 'stated that he desired to be excused from further service on tbe committee of foreign relations. It was suggested that this was a matter for action in legislative session, and the matter was dropped. CLEVELAND AT GENEVA. With Bli Wife He is Present at � Fashionable Wedding. Geneva, N. Y.f Feb. 6.-Geneva presented a holiday appearance to day. The streets were full of people waiting to see ex-President Cleveland and bis wife, who would attend the marriage of b:s old law partner, WilBon S. Bissel, of Buffalo, and Miss Louisa Sturges. The ex-President and party arrived at 11 o'clock by Bpecial train and by special request of a number of prominent citizens Mr. Cleveland held a public reception from 4 until d o'clock, and half the residents of tbe village took advantage of this opportunity to greet the man who led the Democratic party to victory. The ceremony took place at tbe residence of the bride's parents on Poultney street. A reception was held in the evening. Ex-President Cleveland aud party and the bride and groom departed for tbe south on the Lehigh Valley road, at 8 o'clock by a special train. THE TRACY DISASTER. Death Kather Then Marriage. Binoiiauton, Feb. 6.-The motive of Miss Charlotte Dunlap, of Susquehanna, Pa., who committed suicide by taking poiBon last evening, has been discovered. She was engaged to be married on next Wednesday to a young man whom her parents favored, but her affections had been given to another. She left a note requesting to be buried in her wedding dress stating tbat she would rather die than marry a man whom she did not love. The Petti bone Shaft Still Burning-Wilkesbauhe, Feb. 0.-The fire in the Petiboce shaft at Knifton is still burning. This evening tbe idea of flooding the mine has been abandoned, and the tops of both shafts have been sealed air tight, in order to smother tbe fire. Tbe four men who were badly buroBd are still great sufferers at the hospital hero. Now Soak Vuur Head. A Williamsport newspaper man after much mental effort gets off the following: "If a milk trust were to be formed in Lock Haven the daily papers of tbat city would no doubt write it up in a curdling wbey. ' Verdict of the Coroner's Jury-Brave Men GomioAttdsd *or their Acta. Washington, Feb. 6 -The iuquest into the cause and circumstances of tbe Tracy fire was held this afternoon, and the jury rendered a verdict tbat Josephine Morel came to her death by tbe bnrn ing of the Tracy residence, and that the cause of tbe fire is to tbe jury unknown, and that tbe loss of life at the fire was largely due to its exceptionally rapid spread. Each juror also signed tho following statement: The jury regard it but jast and proper to commend all officers and men. of both the fire and police departments for their bravery and efficiency on tbis occasion, and especially Officer Cat 1 in, Chief Harris ai.d- Fireman Howard Wright, to whom we believe Secretary Tracy owes his life. We desire in tbis connection to call the attention of tbe authorities to the Inadequate equipment of tbe fire department of tbe District of Columbia, and to suggest that all modern appliances for saving lives at fires should be immediately furnished, and that the number of men to eaeb company, as well as the number of companies, should be increased, for the reason tbat when an extensive fire occurs, or two fires at the same time, tbe fire department is entirely too small. . Kissing Mother, How many yourg ladies of to day would laugh at tbe absurd idea, as tbey express it, of kissing mother; bat you cannot, dear girls, imagine bow it will brighten ber dear face. Besides you owe her a kiss or two. Away back, when you were a little girl, she kissed you when no one else was tempted by your fever-tainted breath and swollen face. You were not as attractive thon as you are now. And through those years of childish sunshine and shadows she was always ready to cure by the magic of a mother's kiss the little, dirty, chubby bands whenever they were Injured in those first skirmishes with the rough world. And then tbe midnight kisses with which she routed so many bad dreams as she leaned above your restless pillow have all been on interest tbeBe long, long years. Of course, she is not ao pretty and kissable as you are, but if yon had done your share of work these last ten years tbe contrast would not be so marked. Her face has more wrinkles than yours, and yet if you were sick that faoe would appear far more beautiful than an angel's as it hovered over you, watching every opportunity to minister to your comfort, and every one of those wrinkles would seem to be bright wavelets of sunshine oh as ing each other over the dear face. Funeral Notices. The remains of the late John E. Furst arrived in this oity from Jamison City at noon to-day, and were taken at once to his residence on Fourth street near Fair-view. Funeral services at the bouse tomorrow afternoon at one o'clock; Interment at Cedar Hill cemetery. Tbe Masonic fraternity of which the deceased was a member will have charge of tbe funeral. The funeral of Henry Knights will take plaoe Sunday forenoon at 9 o'clock from tbe residence of his brother in East Nilta-ny Talley. Interment will be made at Cedar Hill cemetery. If yon use the French word "grlppo," use the French article "la," to qualify it. If you use tbe English "grip," use the English artic'.o "the." Either use tbe grip or la grippe and dont mix tbem up. The man who never opened his mouth "without saying something" opened it only occasionally, it iu presumed. Fikr and water are like oats and dogs- bring them together and tbey spit and Bizzle. PERSONAL    PENCILING 8. Hon. 3. R. Peale was in Williamsport yesterday conducting one side of a case before Alderman Stead. Judge Cbesnutt, of Ronovo, has been drawn bb a � rand juror, to attend the U.S. District Court, to be held at 8c ran ton, in March. C\ O. Furst, Esq., returned last nlgbt from Lewisburg, where he attended the funerel of his fatber-iu-law, Thomas Beaver Mrs. William Blenb, Miss Bertie M.uler and Mies Ma me Israel were Lock Haven ladies who honored WiUiamsport with their presence yesterday. Miss Emma Harder, who has been in Patterson, N. J , is now visiting friends in Look Haven and proposes a visit to Clearfield before returning to Patterson. Mr. Frank Campbell, formerly General Agent of the Equitably Li Co Assurance Society, of Harrisburg, has accepted tbe position of General Manager for L. C. Vauuxem & Co., General Agents of the N. Y. Life Insurance Co., with special supervision of their interests in tbe State of Pennsylvania. another probable murder Centre County the Scene of a Fatal Stabbing Afiraj Last Night. TWO KEN ATTEND PRAXES MEETING And on thalr W.f Home Quarrel Over a TriaiDs Hiltir, and One Is F.tally Stabbed-The Particular, a. Near a. Can be Learned-Death or Mr*. Hanna-The Juvenile Temple* Centre county w�� the scene of another probable murder last night, the crime having bees committed at Gillan-town, a small village three and a half miles from Snow Shoe. *A tele-phone message to the Express from Snow Shoe this morning gives the following par-ticnlars of the mnrder: Two young men named John Velhdoffer aud John Forcey attended a prayer meeting at Oillantown last night, and after the meeting was dismissed started for their homes together. As they walked along tho road they began discussing the question as to which of them was the best bass singer. From argument they came to blows and Forcy knocked Veihdoffer down several times. Velhdoffer became so enraged at this treatment that he stabbed Forcey in the breast inflicting a wound which resulted in Forcey's death tbis morning about 8 o'clock. Veihdoffer was arrested about one o'clock last night by James Hayes, constable of Snow Shoe township, and was taken at once to Bellefonte where bs is now confined in jail. LATSB. A telephone message to tbe Express from Bellefonte states tbat Veihdoffer was brought to tbe oonnty jail this morning by the constable who arrested him. Veihdoffer claims that what be did w�b in self defence. At noon it had not yet been decided whether a hearing would be given Veihdoffer to-day or not. A still later telephone message from Snow Shoe states that It is now reported there that the men quorreled about a young lady. At 2 p. m. � telephone message from Bellefonte states that Forcey is not dead. There is no hopes entertained of his recovery as the weapon penetrated his right lung. Another Land Slide. Yesterday another land slide occurred near Whet ham, and most of the trains were considerably delayed by tbe occurrence as the dirt and rocks continued to slide down as fast as the large force of men at work could dear tbe tracks. The midnight passenger train east was held for several hours. Provisions for three hundred men were sent up from this oity at midnight, and the work of removing tbB earth from the north side of tbe tracks will be con. tinued without interruption until the job is completed. The passenger train which arrived here in the evening narrowly escaped being caught by the slide, as it oame down about five minutes after the train had passed. eecretarr Kreamer la Town. Mr. J. B. Kreamer, Secretary of the State Flood Commission, is iL town to-day for the purpose of obtaining data to bo used in making up the Commission's final report. Mr. Kreamer returns to Harris-burg to-night. When asked by tbe reporter whether Lock Haven was likely to reoeive any further aid from the Commission he replied tbat he thought not as there are no more funds to distribute. He said bis work at Johnstown was completed and he was not going there soon, as stated in the Williamsport papers. A DtXlGUTFTJL OPPORTUSITV. Death of Sirs. Hannah. Mrs. Maria Qanca, widow of the late Valentine Hanna, died this morning of apoplexy. The deceased was aged about 70 years. She was a sister of Charles Dorey, the Photographer, and Alderman Dorey. Mrs. Hanna leaves tiro sons, Miles and Albert Hanna. iler funeral will take place Sunday aferuoou, from the bouse at 2 o'clock to proceed to tbe Disciple church, where the funeral services will be held. The intermeut will be made at Dunnstown Cemetery. Will Build Their Own Uillowl. The Commissioners of Centre oounty have decided, in view of the frequent murders in that county, to build a gallows of their own upon which to execute Hopkins. The aontraot for constructing the gallows has been given to a Mr. Gault who has been inspecting the one owned by Lycoming oounty, and will build it after that pattern. Unlawful Flabing. It ia said that persons have been fishing with a seine iu the deep hole in the river below Great Island, and hundreds of salmon havo beeu caught. A watob will be kept, and the persons using seine will be prosecuted if the fishing is continued. Meeting of Cantan. A meeting of Canton,  Lock Haven, Patrisroha Millitant,   will be held this evening at 8 o'clock.  A full attendance is requested. Special Tours to the South via Peun.ylv.tila Railroad. A striking illustration of advance in a decade is the fast time and equipments of the Bpecial trains used by tbe Pennsylvania Railroad in its serial personally conducted tours to JaakBOnvilb. Tbe train is conneoted by the vestibule feature, which destroys all annoying motion, and is composed of drawing-room, sleepiog, and smoking cars, and dining car, on whioh meals are prepared by a cliff, whoso popularity extends not only to the epicure, but to all. The accompanying Tourist Agent and Chaperon, an original idea with this com pany, have received such marked praise that a tour now would not be complete without them. When consideration Is given the exceptionally low rate of $50 from New York,and $48 from Philadelphia, including the above described mode of travel, and meals enroute in both directions, it is a wonder more business-worn men and women tired with exacting social duties, don't avail themselves of this opportunity for a rest. Despite the mild Hothern winter, the first and seoond tours were Ailed up, and the third, whioh left Tuesday, the 4th inst., The next tour is announoed for February 18th. Details can be obtained from S. W. F. Draper, 849 Broadway, New Ifork, or W. W. Lord, Jr., 205 Washington Street, Boston; while itineraries can be procured from any of the Pennsylvania Railroad ticket offices. FATAL  MINE EXPLOSION. Another (Horrible Colliory Disaster Occurs in England Yesterday. She Wanted Small chaoa*e. New York Sun. She was a sweet-faced, demure little woman, and as she sat in the ladies' waiting room of the Pennsylvania railroad, in Jersey City, more than one man had his eyes on her and wondered who she was. By and by a young man in a check suit and carrying a great deal of cheek took a circuit around and sat down becide her. He had scarcely dropped into the seat before she gave him a sweet smile and inquired if he would please do her a great favor. "Ah! with all the pleasure In the world !' he made haste to reply. "I want some small change, and if you will be so kind as to take this bill and-'' "Certainly-certainly-most happy to do so;" Baid he as he received it and start-for the ticket office. He banded it in without looking at it and asked for change, but the ticket man shoved it back with the remark: "Wonder how many more fools she will strike before her train goes !" "What do you mean?" "Look at that bill." It was a $5 Confederate note; and as the young man stood staring at it with blinking eyes the tioket man added: You are tbe fifth one within two hours. She brought 'em along for just such an emergency, and the proper thing for you to do is to take a back seat and make yourself as small as possible until your train goes." The crushed young man did even better than that, be left the depot altogether, and bis demeanor was that of a man who intended to hunt up a pile driver and let the hammer fall upon him half a dozen times. THE VICTIMS ESTIMATED AT 150 Partners In Misery. From the Chicago Tribune. Tbe two desperate men run against one another when at the very brink of the deep, swift stream. They stopped and eyed each other with suspicion. "Out of the way sir!" shouted one of them. "Why do you seek to prevent roe from putting an end to a useless life?" "Out of the way yourself!" yelled the other. "You are hindering mo from terminating a miserable existence!" "Who are you?" "I am the invontor of a new buow-plough." "Aud I am tho ownor of a toboggan slide!" They fell on each other's shoulders and wept, and then went and drowned tboir sorrows in the strong waters of a consolation bazaar around the corner. These Two Items From the Jersey fc*hore Herald. Mr. Thomas J. Coolidge, of this place, has, since September 1898, up to the present time, scaled for Wood & Child's, aud different parties, iu Clearfield, CMuton, Tioga and Lycoming counties, one hundred and twenty-nine thousand, five hundred and seventy eight pine, hemlock and oak logs, making seventeen million, Ave hundred and twenty-eight thousand two hundred and twenty-fivo feet. Mr. W. S. Beck, who died at the residence of Mr. John SbultE several days ago, did not loave a wife and family as stated. A daughter who was with him here was not able to accompany the remains of her to Mill Hall for burial. She is still at Mr. at Mr. ShulU's aud is uow considered out of danger. So far as a coroner's jury can Bcttle anything it is now established that Joseph G. Dittman, tbe Philadelphia banker, came to his death by accidental drowning. The DUaeter Caused by the Flooding of the Pit*. Which Forced the Gas Into tho Compartments Where Work Was Id Pro Kress, ami an Explagian Followed - Other News. London, Feb. g.-Aa explosion occurred to-day in the colliery of Abersycbu in Monmouthshire, ten miles northweBt of Newport. Three hundred miners were imprisoned and for several hours no communication could be had with thom. An opening was finally effected aud at noon 200 of them had been rescued. A number of those taken out were aeverely injured. Rescuing parties were still searching for those remaining iu the mine. It is feared tbat it will be impossible to rescue tbem. cause of the explosion. London, Feb. 6.-It is now known that the cause of the colliery explosion to-day was the flooding of tbe pits adjacent to that in which the explosion occurred. By _the flooding of these pits gas was dislodged and forced into the pit where work was in progress, and there it was ignited and exploded. There must have been a great Quantity of gas. as the explosion had tremendous force. It was heard at a distance of a mile. All the gearing in the shaft waB thrown into the air as if from the mouth of a volcano, and simultaneously a vast, bright volume of flame shot upwards, followed by a dense heavy column of Bmoke. grouts op dead. The first party of rescuers organized endeavored to penetrate the pit through the old workings. They got far enough to be able to see groups of the dead, but they could not reach them, and were compelled to retreat by suffocating volumes of smoke that arose in that direction. Upon tbe first appearance of dimunition in the volume of smoke tho rescuers went down the main shaft, and reached the scone of the catastrophe. They rescued a large number of miners yet alive, but al very badly burned, and they brought out Bixty dead bodies, nearly all so mutilated that recognition or their identity is impossible.' The latest estimate of the dead is 150. They are Tired of-Losing Honey. Buffalo, Feb, 6.-Rumors prevailed on the street this morning that the well known firm of H. L. Wright & Company, commission brokers, had made an assign ment. A reporter called on Mr. Wright, who made the following statement: "We are not going to make an assignment. We are have become tired of losing money, and will stop for a short time." The banks are secured and everybody will be paid. Fleming Iimocuratcd Governor. Charleston, W. Va., Fob. 0.-Governor Fleming was inaugurated to-day, tbe ceremonies taking place from the main entrance to the State House. The air was cold, with a raw wind blowing, and for this reasou the attendance was not large. The Republicans, and especially tho Republican members of the Legislature, very generally absented themselves from tho ceremony. Funeral of Mrs. Cryder. The funeral of Mrs. lthue Cryder took place this afternoon at one o'clock from the residence of her father in-law, P. B. Cryder. Rev. H. R. Bender conducted the funeral services, and tho pall bearers were J. R. Stevenson, Henry McCormiok, Frank Satterlee and W. A. Kinsloo. Interment was made iu Highland cemetery Protruded Meeting at Mill Hall. Rev. T. C, Jackson, formerly pastor of the Disolple Church, this city, is conducting a protractod meeting at Mill Hall. The meetings began last Monday night, and will bo coutiuued for somo time. y. p. C. u. Meeting. Tbe regular meeting of the Young People's Christian Union of St. John's English Lutherau Church, will bo hold this evening at 7:^0 o'clock. A full attendance is desired.   Strangers welcome. I. A. Shaffer, Jr., Pres. The Juvenile Temple. A regular meeting of tho Juvenile Temple will bo held to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. All members are requested to be present. Here is something that will tako the wind out of old Htyle spelling schools. Niuea aro chosen and baso ball rules apply. Three mispelled words puts tho speller out and three outs retires tho nine. Correctly Bpollcd words aro runs and mispronunciation is an error, CHAT   I'.y  TUB   1mv. I tout a or Local and Geneml Interest Gathered hy Our lieimrtcn. Whenever I'm rending tho papers I bcc Nearly Knvttytf some name that's familiar to me- Some old time acquaintance of mine has been wed, Or a friend's name is found lu the list of the dead; But one fact peculiar I don't understand I've noticed In an of the papers I've scanned. I look through the "births" with a hope that's forlorn. For no one but strangers appear to bo horn. It is not fair to charge all this foul weather to one little ground hog. Think how bad it was before his regime began. Skates that have beon laid away in camphor are taken*out again. Somebody calls tbis "Father Winter." It has seemed exceedingly mild and childish to be known by that soubriquet. Every well regulatod oity dry goods store now has a restaurant an coxed. What interesting reading the advertising columns of the papers will be when they get to cutting rates in the grub department. Think of this: "Strawberries and cream, with napkin, 18$ cents; reduced from 20, Excellent value. Pork and beans-two-quart bowls, 15 cents. Not more than two orders Bold to one person. These are not shop-worn goods!" In looking over old records and tbe files of old newspapers, we have discovered the remarkable fact that there used to be snow in this country, and that tbe people greatly enjoyed themselves in what they called the winter season in sleighs, which instead of running on wheels, slid smoothly over the frozon snow. The horses attached to said vehicles carried strings of bells around their necks and front and over their backs, and buffalo robes were used to keep the sleigh-riders warm. Sleighing was esteemed great fun, and the young folks had jolly times. They didn't care how cold it was-they jugt snuggled up to each other aud kept warm. All this occurred years ago, before tbe climate changed, which brought rain and mud and the grip instead of sleighing. At Christmas Johnny got the skates, for which he long did fret. No wonder that he blamed tlie fates; He hasn't used them yet." Obscenity in art all depends upon whether the picture is tha work of a mas-ter, or the product of some enterprising tobacco dealer. As.soon as its bacillus was discovered 'Ia grippe" went out of business. What we call life is a journey to death, and what we call death is a passport to life. Some one has well said the costliest article for sale in tho grocery stores ia ''credit." There can bono doubt about it. A little careful management will cuable every man to buy his supplies for cash. It is fallacy to suppose that labor-ng men caonot do tbis. Laboring ment as a rule, are able to meet their rent as it becomes due, and the Bame thing can be done iu every other case where there is an absolute necessity for it. Such a course will prove not only more satisfactory in the end, but will avoid any amount of annoyanco meanwhile. Whatever you or your friends do ia never wholly right.  Ever notice that? Yon cannot do good or evil to others without doing good or evil to yourself. To persecute tho unfortunate ia like throwing stones on one fallen into a well. In the opinion of tho Boston Herald 'the State of Massachusetts can probably show to day more admirable women to the square mile, who can combine tho two extremes of beiug able to read and enjoy Dante's "Paradise" in the original, and yet prepare an appetizing dinner out of tho cheapest cut of lean beef sold in the market, than can be found anywhere else on the face of the planet." But we will wa^ger a pot of Boston baked beans tbat most of them are more at home ia the Paradise" than itrthe kitchen. Aeter all, the joy of success does not equal that which attends the patient working. Two things a man should never be augry at; what he can help, and what he caunot. An artist made a fortune small- In landscape painting be was bred- Hut, woe for hiiu, he !o.tl It all Ju towuscape painting-color: Red, Ykars cannot be weighed ou scales, bu' the weight of them bcuds tho backs of al1 men. Kini> feeling may bo paid with kind feeling, but debts must bo paid with bard cash. Hear both sides and all will be clear; hear but one side aud you will still be iu the dark. Never toll a man that he is a fool; let him aloue aud ho may find it out himself. The man who says to his wife, "give mo tho baby, dear, and I will try and put it to ttleep," is greater than he who taketh a city. A hotf.i. chambermaid may sometimes be called a patter of ina-dust-ry-but not often.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication