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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: January 20, 1890 - Page 1

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Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - January 20, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                �u>>-        s IS -13'     ''-4 :-'    *i    ::q ii   .3  u EIGHTH VEAli-NO. 27:!. 1AJCK HAVEN, l'A., MONDAY, JANUARY' 20, 181)0. PBICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS KI>'SLOK IlKOTHKltS - - E'lTIiLISHlCKS CURRENT COMMENT. The death roll of lSi�0 is already exceptionally long. Some men arc now rcsolviug that New i'ear resolutions aro a delusion and a suaro. A citizen who cannot read will have- a Serious timo wrestling with the Australian ballot. If Protection is ruinous, as Free Traders claim, the ruin is of a very invisible character. It is an open question as to whether Claus Spreckels or the Sugar Trust has the more sand. Calvin 3. Bkio;, of New York and Ohio, will make bis mark in the Senate. It will be a dollar maik. A. fatu definition of infinity: the difference between Schuylkill water at its source and at Philadelphia. That is very pleasant news from Samoa which report all the inhabitants at peace with each other and food plentiful. A Gim/s best and truest friend is ber mother. Her counsel followed will prevent many a mistep and lead to happiness. The newspaper editors throughout tbo country are receiving a good share of the post offices under Presidont Harrison's administration. Alfitoxzo, the infant King of Spain, whose death seemed certain a few days ago, has rallied, and bis recovery is now probable. Well, he has something to live for. Says the Philadelphia Inquirer: "There is one honest Democrat iu the Ohio Legislature, and bis name is Smith. Ho refused to vote for Brlcc Smith is a name easily remembered, and thia particular Smith ought not to be forgotten. The latest thing in electricity is an electric mouth lamp by which may be ehown even the circulation of blood in the teeth. The dentist has snUir.e u.iti:- ! nuity enough in inventing new tortures for the civilized human being without the aid of the electric fiend. ViCTOiiiA WoODiiuLLand Jennie Clatlin are threatening to suo Inspector Byrnes, of Now York, for libel- These two lively sisters, who have almost been forgotten since they went to England and found new hu&bfvnds, arc now respectable old ladies. Still it is so long since they bavo been heard from that many people here will wonder who they are. "It HAi- grown to be a stock resort," says the I'ilt&tou Gazette, "of nearly every defeated aspirant to prominence in Republican state politics to attribute bis failure to the interference of Senator Quay. Woro Mr. Quay to participate in all the fights ioto which his name is thus dragged he would, aside from his other occupation as Senator, be the busiest and must wonderful mau of modern times.*' Expi.orek Stanley will make a prolonged stay at Cairo,, ouuof tbo reasons for which is his unwillingness to undergo the great change iu tcmperatme involved in passing from Centra1. Africa into Northern Europe during tbo winter. Mr. Stanly is wise. By remaining where tho climate is agreeable, even though very warm, ho would bo s;ifer than iu venturing north, at the risk of taking cold, and possibly of having a tussle with influenza white bis system is not iu the best condition to endure such a strain. THE JUDICIAL CONTEST A Decision iu tbo Famous Lycoming Couv-ty Judgeship Contest Senator "William 13. Alli.con will go back to Washington for another term of six years by tho unanimous voto of the Kepublicans of the Iowa Legislature. There was no vote against his reuomina-tion i� theliepublicaucancus.althougb the Democratic press has teemed with stories of opposition. Senator Allison has already nearly completed tbreo terms in the Senate, having previously served a number of torms in the House of Uupruseutativca. His experience is therefore iuviiiu;ible. As chairman of tho Senate Committee on Appropriations he has long held a prominent and influential place in  that body. Forep>tQi�li't  Was Klceted-A Lftfnl Election Was Held-Disgenthij- Opinion �f JudffO B tidier. Wil-lia.msi'Okt, Jan. IS.-In the judgeship contest to-day Judge- Hock&fellcr banded down an opinion assented to by Judge Major, iu which he rules that the burden of proof rests on John J. MeUgor, the respondent, and not ou Benjamin S-Beutly, tho contestant. This opinion created a great sensation in logal circle."-Judge Bucher filed a dissenting opinion. Judge Uockafeller, after carefully reviewing the case, says: The contestants raise two questions of non-compliance with Vbe registration law; first, can there be a legal election in ca^e there is no registration whatever.' and, secondly, is there any evidence of a registration of tbo electors of Lycoming county, iu the year 18SS? Can there bo no legal election held in Pennsylvania without a registration of voters? Tbo Constitution regulates tho elections; but no elector shall be deprived of the privilege of voting by reason of his name not being registered, but preliminary proof of bis qualification is necessary to constitute au unregistered elector, a legal voter. Tho act contemplates a record of all election proceedings, of which the registry of the electors is a part, which said registry is to be kept by tbo County Comrnissioneis, and tho election returns arc to be filed by the pio thonotary. A contest atid vexation;! litigation is uninviting, where evidence that , the law has been complied with, are accessible. no election' withol't keoistkatidn. In Pennsylvania there is a Constitutional Registration iaw, and we are bound to obey it. I bold tn.it where there has been no registration of tho electors by ti-e i.ni-ccrs iiitiubiud with nitty,  iu  i>ui>;i- ance of the htws uf the state, there can be no local election. It will not do to h"!i3 that the election wouUl be legal where there has been nu compliance with thy law of registration of the electors. The only reason why the court hesitates to determine that the election held ou Tuesday the Cth day of November,, 1 iu the County of Lycoming, was undue arid Illegal, is that it has been shown, and is not denied, that there was in fact a registration of tho electors of the county made by the persons intrusted with the duty of making such registration, and was in tho County Commissioners1 uliicr. The difficulty is that the said registration was cot kept in that office. Instead of retaining the same, and keeping i: on file as a record, as it was their duty to do, the County UommissUmei'Bt, s.-im: r,mt> hefi^-e thedayoflho election, s� nt the 'ui^intil registration, instead of a copy, toii-c elec tiou (.-fljeers of their resp'-f,ti-'e di:-;i icts. There was therefore w> rer.i.-'iiul^n uf the electors on file in the County Commissioners' office at tho time of tl.e election and perhaps not for several days or weeks prior thereto. This was a mistake and a violation of thu mandatory provisions of the third section of the act of 1S7-4, hut the judges decided that then: was a rcgi.*-ti at ion and consequent ly a |i'g:d dee ttoif. The court huU's that tbo pri.ieipa". difficulty in this esse was that the registration of the voters was not kept in the Commissioners' ofll je. That it v.-;vs through ignorance sent to the  r to obuin a complete list ot the irregularities. Court then adjourned. iDtert-felittj; Loc;il Inslitur. Pew Local Institutes arc so interesting a:,d enjoyable as thy one held at Lamar, Pa., the 17th and l>^b inst. Tho Friday evening session consisted of music, addresses and recitations. Tho moiiiiitg session, Saturday, was opened by tinging ' (>'.d Hundred." i'rof. Bruugard then led in prayer. The electiou of officers followed, The nomiuatioua were: Prof. Biuugard, President; Mr. Ilarter, vico President; Mi&s Keller, Secretary. Miss Suiter read a paper on Busy Work. It was well prepared. The subject was ably discussed by teachcru, and friends of, education. Mr. LI. D. Loveland began the discussion on Duty of Parents to Teachers, lie stated that tho duty of (�very parent is to have their children attend school regularly. The teacher to bo Micce.-hful needs the u-ooperatiou of tho p.oenis. Other speakers followed in this lute of thought. Tho Kpeecbcs were heartily approved by thu teachers. Tho sub-p:e.t, I/ingnage Lessons, was opoticd very ntei ly by Mir-s Downey. New and useful idea* �ere givtri. Othcrtf present tool; p;-i* in the discussion. After a recitation and M>rig the Institute adjourned till 1 :l!0 p m. Mi'-s Loveland opened the afternoon hi f?Moii by leading a paper on Number Wmk in which Mm thoionghly discussed that subject. Other teachers paiticipatcd in the discussion. This was followed by a discussion of Business by Messrs. Ilarter and Suiter. Mr. Hyatt, gave an interesting talk on the Planutory Svstom. Prof. Brnngaid addressed tho teachers cm School Management. His talk was practical and enjoyed by all. The sessions were interspersed with music, recPatums, ami class drills. All tho sessions were well attended and apparently enjoyed. The people of Lunar desejvo our thanks for thu hospitable manner in which they entertained the teachers. Several teachers from other townships were present and took active part in the discussion. Hepor it'd 1; tj; 1 ire. There is a rumor in the city to-day that the Logan House in Sugar Valley was biirnt-d this morning. The newH reached ibis place via. Pine .-tatiou. As thoro is no telephone communleatiou with that section it is impossible to ascertain whether the report is true or uot. riinuml of J. HI. Towns Tho remains ol the late J. M. Towns arrived in this oily Saturday afternoon. Tho fe.i iivd .'eiviei:.-i Uric- enijducled yesterday afternoon at the residence of Miles Towns, Water sheet, by Kev. M. B. Byan, uf Williauispoil. The interment waa made at IMmnstown. WORK OF THE GBIM REAPER Four Deaths Moro Since. Our Eeporl of Saturday. "STING*" MILLIO'AIKKS. LATEST mm ABOUT  THE CITY Ex-IVbimatter Collier-Tins Sick Mall C�r-tiort*- A   Land  Slide-More    Light   for Lock Haven-Of Slior) iniration-Atttuse-nicnld  to   Cjiii? -The   Norm 11   School E*honoRtai�h, The "grim reaper" is still busy in our midst, and deaths aroof a daily occurrence. Sicco our Issue of Saturday four deaths have taken place, which are &b follows: SnUon O. I lark. Tho announcement yesterday morning of the death of Sutton G, Clark, came like a thuuder clap from a clear sky npon tbo people of this city. Mr. Clark's death occurred at three o'clock Sunday morning after au illness of about two weeks. His sickness began with an attack of La Grippe which developed into billions fover. The deceased was one of tbo prominent business men of this city, having been concerned in the book and stationery business here for a number of years. Ho waB a genial, good natured man and had a largo circle of acquaintances and friends. It is said of hini by his relatives, that tboy never knew him to be angry or iJlhumor-ed. His good nature was contagious aud nouo could bo iu his presence without feeling the effects of his kindly disposition. Mr. Clark was aged about 44 years, and ho was unmarried. Tho funeral services will bo held Tuosday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the residence of his brother, James \V. Clark, corner of Main and Henderson streets. Tho ronntus will bo taken to Cedar Hill cemetery for interment. .Hra. Susan Eaton. I Mrs. Susan Eaton died yesterday morn- ; ing At Q;L*0 at tho residence of her son-in- j law Mr. Charles Ivreamer; aged 91 years. Mrs. Eaton was with one exception probably the oldest womau in Clinton county. She was born in Lewiston, Me., aud canio to this county iu lSdo, For 72 yoirs she had been a ehurcM number, aud was an active and zealous worker in the church uutil incapacitated by the infirmitios of old age. She was ill but a few day^s, her sickne-s being ''La Gri;peT'or ruflueuza. Funeral services Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at tho  resideuoo,  coruer Church and Second streets, land cemetery. Interment iu High- Mrs. Rebecca E. Miller. Mrs. Rebecca E. Miller, wife of J. D. Miller of Milt Hall, died at that place yesterday morning, aged 30 years, G months and 23 days. Deceased leaves a husband and one child. The funeral will bo held to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock, in the M. E. Church. Death of an Infant. The iufant child of Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Newcomer died this moruinjj. a liusinesH Tluit  Require* Judgment. Farming is a business that requires judgment in every department. The farmer should not plaeo his depeudenco upon a. single crop, for such a crop may bo lesseued iu yield by au unlucky season, or in value by prices in a fluctuating market. Diversified farming reduces the liability of failure, aud permits of hotter cultivation and longer seasons for work. Prices may bo low on some crops aud high on others, thy result depeuding on the season and the area cultivated. a (JiKmitJc Fraud. Ihmcau Ciark's lady minstrels that appeared at tbo Opera House- Saturday night wa a gigantic fraud bo far as talent was concerned. Ribald, inuonduea and vulgar insinuations were tho chief stock in trade and eaused somo degree of enthusiasm among the not overly largo audience of men and boys present. We trust shows of tbo Duncan Clark ilk will iu tho future give Lock Haveu tho iio-by. Fi�w Sumtt of Them  I)rem   Hint*  to Fortune Muni id-New Ymfc WorUl. Mrs. Hetty Oreen has enjoyed the reputation for a long time of being the most shabbily dressed millionaire who wanders withm the preointa of Wall street, and any one who has seen her aud made a comparison mentally with tl'e appearance of a mecbauic's wife going to market Saturday night is convinced that her reputation is well deserved. KubsrI Sage wears inexpensive clothes, but they are not only neat but usually have the appoarance of being recently purchased. The only millionaire rival Mrs. Green has in point of sbabbiness is old Joe Robinson, who was one of tbe contractors engaged in the construction of the Union Pacific railroad aDd is said to be worth H.000,000. He was down in Wall street yesterday progressing aloog tbe thoroughfare with the assistance of biB crutches, as tbo genial old follow is lame, dretsed in a suk of gray clothes and without an overcoat. He doesn't wear aoy ovorcoat because it represents an expenditure of money ho is not willing to malre.ij His whole outfit, including bat and boots, would not command $2.50 at any well regulated pawnshop. He is one of tho few stingy millionaires who are perfectly good natured in their stinginess. He is cross or crabbed, but greets everybody he knows with tho utmost geniality. He and Sidney Dillon are very good friends, but neither the arguments of Mr. Dillon nor any one else can spnr him to invest money in a wardrobe. The story is told of his seeing a friend on tbe streets not long ago in conversation with a gentleman he did not know. Ho went up to tbe two men and was about to speak, when the man who was astranger to him turned and said he was sorry but be bad no small change. The friend explained tbe situation, although he was somewhat embarrassed, and the stranger extended profuse apologies to the millionaire whom ho had mistaken for ft beggar. Tho Tioriiiiil Scliool Phonograph. Tho phonograph for tho Normal School has been recoived and was put in working order Saturday afternoon. The machino i:; one of the latest improve^, and gave an "entertainment" for thu students Saturday evening. The rollers contain selections of music a,ii rendered by tbo New York Fifth Keglincnt band, and other choice music. The people of Lock Haven can hoar tho phonograph every evening this week between the hours of T:U0and t*:JJ0t excepting Friday evening, on the payment of 10 couts. The money obtained in this way will ba for the benefit of tho reference library of tho JNormal Softool. amtiieiiieiilg to Couie. Tho Till Family""Uock Band" Concert Company is the next attraction at the Opera House. Tbe date is Wednesday evening 2dlh iost., aud the proceeds are for the benefit of the 1. O. G. T. "Keubon Glue,'' a laughable Yankee comedy, will make pcnplo laugh on the *31st inst. Kitty Khoades, supported by a stroDg company will open a week's engagement Fub. 10th. Popular prices will prevail and a number of plays now to Lock Haven will be presented. A Land Slide. A slide of rocks and earth occurred yesterday rooming- ou tho Philadelphia aud Eric Railroad near Whetham. The construction train and crow went up from this city to assist in clearing the tracks which was speedily done. Lnld Lo Rent The remains of tbo late Daniel liittuor were consigned to their last resting place Saturday afternoon. Tbo pall bearers were members of the masonic fraternity, of which tho deceased was a member. Hov, 11. K. Header conducted tbo funeral services and a largo concourao of citizens followed tho bo ly to Highland cemetery A Team Itun� Away. A team 0/ heavy horses attached to a brewery wagon were loft standing on Jay street this morning for a few minutes without being tied. Tbo horses started In tho absence of tho driver, and ran as far as tbo bridge where they were caught as they attempted to passed through tho gate. No damage- was done. Kntcrliilmueiit nt Ittnuvo. The iirst of a scries of musical entertainments under the auspices of the W. II. C, was given iu Ueuovo Friday night. Tho proceeds of tho entertainments will bo given to the Soldiers' Homo at lirookvillo. Commandery Meet I dr. A meeting of tho Commandery of Knights of tho Goldeu Eagle will bo hold to night iu Scott's bazar for drill. PKUSONAL    PENCILINQS. MISS CAMMERER'S VICTORY Tho Jury Givo Her $12,000 Damages in tho Broach of Promise Suit MIL MULLER CALLS It K0BBEKT Colonel Ineersol Declares H�  Will  Carry the Cue to a Hlfher Court. Id  the Interact of the Aged Defendant-Destructive Fire at Frugality-Fatal Collision Between Boatt. New York, Jan. 19.-There was quite a crowd in Judge Iognm's Court-even if it was Sunday-when he took tbe bench to receive the verdict in Caroline J. Cammer-er's suit against Clemens Muller f or J $100,-000 damages for breach of promise. The fair plaintiff was not in court. It was said she was sick in bed, exhausted by the excitement of tbe trial. Mr. Daniel Dougherty was not there either, and Mr. Lewis tbe janitor counsel, looked after Miss Cammer's interests. Tbe aged defendant was on hand, and so was Mrs. Richter. Colonel IngereoU looked as though he had bad a premonition of bad news. The sealed verdict agreed upon by the jury Saturday evening was opened by Judge Iugtabam and read. It found $12,-000 damages for the plaintiff. Tbe spectators wanted to start a demonstration of approval, but it was checked. THE JUDGE HEM EMBERS THE DAT. Colonel Ingersoll rose to make the usual motions for setting aside tbe verdict, a new trial, etc., but Judge Ingraham stopped him. The Court declined to transact any business on Sunday beyond the mere receiving and recording of the verdict, and directed Colonel Ingersoll to defer bis motions until to-morrow morning. The jury was polled, thanked by Judgelngraham and discharged, and the Court adjourned. After adjournment Colonel Ingersoll said: "It's an idiotic verdict. We were too high above tbe jury. If we had been down nearer their level it would have been all right. We shall carry tbe case to tbe court of last resort.!' "Such a verdict is as bad as highway robbery," was tbe exasperated comment of the aged defendant, who was about to express his feelings freely, when Colonel logeraoll took him by tbe aim, wb\spexed consolingly iu bis ear, and calmed him down. ''Its just about such a verdict as I expected,'' was the comment of Mr. Lgwis, junior counsel for Miss Cam merer. HOW THE VERDICT WAS REACHED. The jury, when they first went out, balloted ou tbe question whether tbe finding should be for the plaintiff or defend ent, and the vote stood eight to four in favor of Miss Cam merer. Tbe four were won over to tbe side of the majority before very long, and then it came to a settlement of the amount of damages. Tbe highest figure advocated was $30,000 and the lowest 43, 0C0. D. IS. Kunes, oi Beech Creek, is in the ity to-day. Kev. K. W. Ferkins, pastor of tho Baptist Church, is conflued to his bod by l,La Grippe." Kev. S- DarmstaeUer preached in tbe St. Marks Lutheran church at Williams-port last night. Judge Crawford, who has bt>eu ill with iniluenz i for a week or more, was able to go to Uenovo last Saturday. I'iMtbouotary John F, [frown, who ha? *jeeu ill with fever for somo timo, is reported as slightly improved this raoruing. Tluo. Whaley, a reporter on tbe Wil-liamsport Gazette and Bnlletin,spQut a few hours in Look Haven ou Satuiday among old friends. Mr, E. J. Lirkins, Cashier of Coo bran, I'ayuo it McCortuick's bank at Williams-port, attended tbo funeral oi Col. E. C. Mc-Cluro this afternoon. Mv. James M. Duncan, of WHiiamsport, a member of tho firm of Loder, Duncan it Waidley or the New York 5 and 10 cent store, of this oily, continues to improve in health aftt-r a tenons illness. Misses Alollic and Jennie IJoul, of Centre Hall, aro guests of M>s Carrie Lent, No. 28 Commerce street. Tho ladies bavo just returned from au extended visit with friends in tbo oil regions. Bo Very Careful. A promineat physician of this city remarked yesterday that be would not be at all surprised if every person in Lock Haven should have an attack of La Grippe, owing to warm, moist weather. Tbe influenza, which at first is only a Might tickler of mucous membrane has in its development danger on account of a tendency to pneumonia. Tbe most casual readers of tbe mortality record of the last few weekB must have marked tbe number of deaths which bavo been due to this terrible disease, and most of tbe cases were said to have  followed an  attack of the Under the present conditions of weather one cannot be too careful. Look out for your lungs. Do not expose yourself to draughts, nor bo too ready to make changes in clothing. The pneumonia is not a cheerful visitant, and it was never more to be avoided than now. Be oireful. Look to your luugs. CHAT  BY THE WAV. Items of Local and General Iptereat Gathered by Our Report*". What'b the use In worrylngi Of hurrying. And scurrying, Everybody flurrying Aud breaking up their rest* When every one Is teaohin? u�. Preaching and beseeching us To settle down and end thi* fuss For quiet ways are best. Have you lost the grip? That diary you started-is it keeping well. Greely's cold waves are rank counterfeits. The sick man wants a constitutional amendment. When tbe sun comes out these days, tbe daughters are certain to follow*. The profane man never should boast that be is as good as his word, A man can not be expected to foot a' bill without a little kioking about A. pocket book, containing % uaaU sum of money, was found on Main street today. The real estate man wants the earth, and usually has some ground for such   a desire. A Blooinsburg business man is holding $10,000 worth of Confederate money, for a 'raise." The man who thinks quick and speaks slow will be very apt to get along in the orld safely. The man who depends for success upon shady methods in politics naturally objects to ballot reform. While tbe average American don't care a cent for a king be is very apt to go his entire pile on (our kings. A McGinty ball is the latest. We soppose the participants were all ''dressed in their best suit of clothes." The man, woman or child w*k> has not had a cold within the last month, would be a prize freak for a dime museum. The mau who picks up a wire on the street is quite likely to get hold of something that will cure him of the grip. "Well, what's new to-day?" asked Swiggs. "Same as yesterday/' answered Swags; "new-ralgia and new-monia." A man is very much like a buckwheat caka in this weather. He is disinclined to rise, and when be does is sour and heavy. Tbe New York Herald prints a pioture of President Harrison's ear, which will interest many politicians who have failed to get it. The boy is father to the man. The reason so many men fail to do anything creditable is that they wasted their time upon folly in youth and early manhood. A young woman was married for six months, last week, to test whether matrimony is a failure* If she should play quits at tbe end of the term, will she be a brevet widow or what? Of Short Duration. Last Saturday morning the sliding of logs was commeuced on all the lumber jobs up river. The cold wave was of short duration, and before tbe day closed the temperature was so high that tbe ice on tbe slides had melted aud sliding was at an end for tbe preseut. Tile PngilUt in MlflfttasipP1. Mkiuuen, Miss. Jan. 19.-William Muldoon, Mike Cleary and Mike Donovan are here in charge of the detectives. They leave for Purvis to-night to appear to-morrow for trial on the charge of having aided and abetted the Sullivan* Kilrain fight. Kx-Postmsstsr Collier* A Westport correspondent of the Renovo News writes as follows to that paper: Thos. Collier for a long time a resident of this township is now confined to a bed at thi Westport House. Proprietor Maloney has kept him free of charge for a long time. During this week Overseer of the Poor Joseph M. Hall was sent for and Collier Is no* a county charge. He is over seventy years old. Dyspepsia and lack of proper care of a once healthy constitution bas brought him to where he is to-day. There was considerable complaining about the tardiness of the Overseer but only those who know tbe difficulty of obtaining a suitable person to tako charge of such cases, know bow unjust tbis censure was. Joseph Half is all right aud will do all he can to make an easy and pleasant life for those reduced to pauperism iu his district. Li it of Letters. Remaining uncalled for letters in the Lock Haveu post office for the week t Tiding January 18th, 1890: D, S. Anderson, Mrs. S. Bricker, 8. H. Coles took, James R. Darrab, Chas. A. Diffin, Miss Emmma Englert (2), Peter Fisher, John Ganton, Andrew D. Gram ley, Miss Tacie Smith, Fred M. Probst, Miss Julia Kane. Daniel Keefe, J. H. Kurtz, Mrs. William Loveland, Katy Mahany, M. F. Holbrooke, Mrs. Nancy Ritchie, Miss Sarah Stean, Miss Maggie M. Snyder, John Sawyer, Miss Mary E. Travis, Miss Vernia Wren. Persons should invariably have their mail addressed to tbeir street and number, thereby assuring prompt and correct delivery by tbe cirrier3. Matter not so addressed is often detained on that account. R. S. Babkeb, P. M. Financial Acumen. Lawyer-Your uncle makes you bis sole heir; but tho will stipulates that the sum of $1,000 must be buried with him. Heir (feelingly)-The old man was ec centric; but his wishes must be respected, of course.  I'll write a check fox VbaX amount. More Light for Lock Haven. The Wiliiamsport Gazette and Bulletin �ays: There will be a Westinghouse electric light plant established in Lock Haven next spring. The people there, especially the merchants, want incandescent lamps In tbeir bouses and business places. The dynamo tbat furnishes tbe aro light there only has a capacity of thirty-five lamps and this number is not enough to supply the demands. Several prominent business men, it is understood, with plenty of ener-\ �7 > ttnd capital, bave fceeu discuBB* [ ing the advisabilty of such a move.   

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