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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: January 14, 1890 - Page 1

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - January 14, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                EIGHTH YEAH-NO. 268. LOCK HAVEN, PA., TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1890. PBICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPBESS KINSLOK 11KO TITERS---PUBLISHERS CURRENT COMMENT. The Philadelphia Times almanac for 1890 has been received. It is an interesting and valuable publication and like the Times is neat and attractive. The Pope's income for 1889 is $30,000 less than in 1888, but aa Iris income runs into the millions, there will be no immediate poverty in the Vatican. Tue Philadelphia Record asserts that "la grippe" prevailed to au alarrriDg extent in this country one hundred years ago and that tho Indians ascribed their affliction to witchcraft. We are not prepared to contradict our esteemed contemporary. SAVAGES OF THE STORM. SHE  SAID YES BY TELEPHONE. . The H�    Got It Causes More Destruction Thau Was at First Supposed. BTJEIED BENEATH THEIR DWELLINGS Abtkii a reign of about two months,His ilajesty King Influenza has been deposed and banished from St. Petersburg and Moscow. It is said that not a vase of the grippe exists in either city. This gives encouragement to the idea that America will soon be released from the epidemic, and it already shows signs of abatement in Philadelphia, New York and elsewhere. Can a man fish with a seine in bis own private pond on his land? is the question that has been agitating the people in Montgomery county. A fish warden saw the owner at work aud sued him for violating the fish laws of the State. The Justice of the Peace decided he bad a right to catch his own fish in his private pond. The higher courts will be appealed to. Says the New York Star : "The proposed amendment to the jury law, exempting newspaper men from jury duty is a proper one and should be passed by the Legislature at once. Practically the law, as far as journalists are concerned, is a dead letter, Bioce the Commissioners of Jurors and all the Judges in the courts properly and promptly excuse journalists summoned before them from service as jurors." The base ball club trip around the world cost over $52,000. The receipts were 1,000 less, and to bo added to this loss was about �2,000 loaaod t!i� players, which has not yet bejn returned. The firm expectB to recover this or most of it in time. When the expedition was organized it wns thought it would be profitable, and Leigh Lynch and Anson went in as partners. The firm, however, assumed the loss at the close, as they felt amply repaid by the advertisement they had received. Congressman McKihley's postage on letters asking questions about public business frequently amounts to five dollars a day, besides the cost of a secretary he has to keep to write the answers. Persons writing members of Congress for information almost uniformly neglect to inclose a stamp as they should do. Major Mo-Kinley is only an example, though at present be is probably the greatest sufferer from the forge tfulnetts or indifference of correspondents. The late Mr. F. B. Guwen held life insurance policies to the amount of $220,-000. The various companies have begun to pay these, aud all of them will be settled in full without a contest. This is simple justice, but does any sensible man doubt that had the holder been a man on a I:>wer plane of social public life, one less known and without influential friends, that these insurance companies would have paid over this large sum without a protest? Then there would have been a costly contest before the heirs could bave come by their own. NEWS   AMD MOTES. The annual report ol the National Woman's Christian Temperance Union for 1889 shows a total membership of 142,348, � gain of 3821 on the membership of the preceding year. John Fulton, Manager of the Cambria Iron Works, who charged Hev. Dr. Beale, of the First Presbyterian Church, Johnstown, with neglecting his congregation and dishonesty Sunday withdrew the latter charge during the services. A bill was introduced in tho Senate of Mississippi on Saturday to amend the charter of Jackson. It proposes to restrict the right to vote for Mayor and other offices to those who can read and write or who own $300 worth of taxable property. Ten tons of molten steel 'were spilled in the converter pit at the Illinois Steel Company's mill, Chicago, on Saturday night, and three men narrowly escaped being caught by the seething mass. As it was, they were badly burned, but were rescued by brave companions. Olcutt Payne, a student of Easton College, has been sentenced to three months' imprisonment aud $100 fine, at New Haven, Connecticut, for the theft of two rifles from the Winchester Kopeating Arms Company. The rides were of a new design, and the company think tho young man's theft was instigated by a rival arras company. The employes of nine largo shoe factories at Haverhill, Massachusetts, wero locked out on Saturday night by the concerted action of the manufacturers, the object being to sustain J. H. Wincbell & Co., in their contention with their bauds. The men say they can Btay oat three months if necessary. Sad Details or the Ruin Wrought at Clinton -Father and Two Children Killctl Out right, and Mather mod One Cliitd l>yin� -The Storm Severe In Kentucky-Fatill lies at ByracnHB and Rochester. Cairo, 111., Jan. 13.-Tho tornado which visited Clinton last evoning did considerable destruction to property at Wickleffe, Ky., and also at Moscow, Ky. The storm at Wickleffe was especially disastrous, although no persons were killod. The first house struck in Clinton was the section bouse of the Illinois Central road, occupied by John Rhodes and family. Rhodes and two children were killed outright. His wife and one child escaped death, but are both dangerously hurt. The house of John Gaddich was blown down, and afterward Gaddich was found under the debris with an infant in his arms. Gaddich was dead, hut the child was not hurt. The house of Robert Johnson, which stood on tho brow of the hill, seemed to divide in half, cutting in two just be- j fore the second floor aud letting the upper j portion fall in its place. Johnson was in the lower room, and the upper part fell on him, pinning him to the earth with a joist across his back. His moans attracted attention, and he was rescued badly injured. His sou Robert was up stairs, and was dangerously hurt by falling timbers. It is thought the city will be able to supply all the demands for help for tho homeless, and a committee is at work seeking aid. blcwino great CVS3, Niagara Falls, Jan. 13.-A cyclone struck this place to-day, and tho wind attained a velocity of ninety miles au hour, carrying everything before it. Buildings, barns, trees, telegraph poles, railway semaphores, aud fences toppled over like straws. The Canadian Webb Company's building was blown down, tho walls falling on one 15 year old girl. All persons I'scitpvu L-xcept Aiu^ "iiikoijf. wbo had a log broken aud was badly bruised. Two guys of the foot itiid carriage suspension bridge that had been rebuilt last Spring snapped and fell into tbe river. Tbe greatest anxiety was felt for tho fate of the bridge itself, fears being entertained that it would go down bodily. It rocked to and fro like a cradle, and an official closed the approaches and would not allow any one to cross the structure. The storm decreased in vio lence about noon, preventing damage. killed at rochester. Rochester, Jan. 13.-During the high wiud to-day George Miller was killed by a falling chimney. George Seward, an express wagon driver, was kicked in tbe head by his horse, which had been blown down by the force of the wind. He fell and the horse rolled on him, causing internal injuries.   He may die. Tbe South wall was b'owo out of the Joslyn block, on State stroer, falling ou and crushing the frame buildiug next door.   No one was injured. Tho roof of tho Genesee Brewery malt house, part of the roof of Curtis Brother's canning factory, and part of the spire of St. John's Church, were blown off. There were many narrow escapes. the blow at syracuse. Syracuse, Jan. l;j-A severe wiud storm raged hero this afternoon, many buildings being unroofed. The new freight house of the Rome, Watertownand Ogdon Railroad, now in course of erection on Fulton street, was blown down. Sixty-five men wero at work on the building, and William Wills, a carpenter, killed. About a dozen carpenters severely injured. the wind causes a wreck. Lima, O., Jan. 13.-Tho south bound passenger train on the Cinciutiati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad at 2 o'clock this morning ran into a box oar at Milton station. Tbe engineer, John Herbes, and his fireman, Fred Harold, wero seriously hurt. The express messenger, J. A. Hoffman, of Toledo, had his shoulder dislocated and was badly bruised. The box car was blown from a siding to the main track by the heavy wind. a train blown from the track. Montreal, Jan. 13.-A dispatch from St. Ililaire says that a local tr.iiu on tho Grand Tiunk Railway, from Actonville for Montreal, was blown from tho track to-day. Tho conductor, brakemen, mail clerk and three passengors were seriously injured, and several other persona were slightly injured. Oil City, Jan. 13.-Tho tail end of the Western cjclouo struck this section early this morning, doing great damage to property. At least out* fourth of all tho oil derricks in this neighborhood were destroyed. Drummer Wan  Bury, hut Ahead �?f the professor. From the New York Tribune. There is a youug lady living in Detroit who for some time has been the recipient of the attentions of two young men, one professor in tho Stato University at Ann Arbor'and the other a traveling salesman for a New York wholesale hardware house, whose route extends through Michigan aud parts of Cauada.   One day last week tho New Yorker arrived in Detroit late in the afternoon, aud of com so immediately started making the rounds of the retail hardware dealers, with the laudable pur-poso of selling each a good stock for the winter before tbe representative of tho rival house should put in an appearance. He had hoped to call on the object of his affections in the evening, but business was good and 8 o'clock found him busy trying to induce a Woodward avenue dealer to take six dozen axes, four dozen grindstones and a half carload of wooden pails, At this stage oftheproceedingsayoung er brother of the young lady dropped in to buy a new jackknife, and mentioned casually that the Ann Arbor professor was up at the house.   It instantly occurred to tbe enterprising cutlery salesman that the professor had como for no other purpose than to lay his heart at the feet of the young lady he himself adored.  For a moment there was a struggle in his breast but he speedily got control of himself and decided that he could not possibly leave the store, as the dealer was just on tbe point of deciding to take the pails.   But the thought of giving up the lady who had been for months constantly in his mind, waking or sleeping, waB unbearable. Light suddenly dawned on him.   Handing the dealer a circular explaining tbe merits of his new doublc-hladed chopping-knives, he requested the use of the merchant's telcphono for five minutes, stepped to it and rang up the central office. A moment later the telephone bell at the residence of the young lady rang sharp and decisive. The professor had been there for an hour talking pleasantly of the graud educational work they were doing in tbe department of fussilology at Aun Arbor.   When the bol! rang-, tho lady's l*t" �s~^-iiS^TT^nt (he was a physician), she exiMisuj __--------- Unix mo adjoining room to answer it. The profossor heard her step to the telephone aud say "Yes," makca short pause, audsay"Yes" again. Then thcro was a short pause and he heard her say' "Why-why-really, this is sudden." Then there was a still longer pause and he heard horsay, "Yes," softly, then "Good-by," and she hung up the receiver and came back into tho room. The professor moved closer to the fire and remarked that it was a chilly evening, and ho thought it was going to snow, aud then resumed his talk about the great work at the university. Fifteen minutes later thcro was a ring at the front dooi bell. The lady answerd it aud a district mes-csengor boy handed her a plain gold ring, which she slipped on her finger and returned to tho parlor.   "3Iiss-," said the professor five minuets later, "I want to ask you an important question this evening. Excuse me for putting it bluntly, but will you be my wife?" But we need uot go further with this. Two minutes later the professor went down tho front steps, shook his fist at the telephono wire, and took tho 8:45 train for Ann Arbor. WAY'S MELANGE. THOSE LCI) IE PUTTY JAKS. All the Latest Local Events Up to 2:30 P. M. Told in a Concise Manner. NEWS  FE0M THE  T0UE WARDS Officer! Installed- The Coroner's luqnett Swaying  in the Wlnd-Kently Cur the L.o�B-J. M, Town's Body-The Weather -Repairing a Steamer-Lady Minstrels Coming. At the regular meeting of John S. Bit-tner Post G. A. R. held last night the fol lowing officers were installed for the en suing year : Commander, G. W- Webb; Senior Vice Commander, Frank McM&hon*, Junior Vice Commander, D. K. Shadle; Officer of the Day, R. W. Sehell; Burgeon, Dr. R. B. Watson; Chaplain, " John A. Robb; Quarter master, J. B. Lesher; Officer of the Guard, Charles A Morse; Sergeant Major, H. L. Gould; Qnarter Master Sergeant, C. Y. Sterner. The installation exorcises were public and of an interesting character, the evenings entertainment participated in by the Woman's Relief Corps and Sons of Veterans. Owing to tbe illness of the Mustering officer, J. It. Ken dig, of Renovo, Senior Past Post Commander, G. T. Mich-vels, performed the installation ceremonies. The Coroner's Inftaest. Coroner Mader bald an inquest yesterday aiternoon on the body of James WalU, the man who was killed at the Beech Creek railroad bridge near Beeob Creek borougb. Tbe Coroner empanelled as a jury H. H. Mothersbaugb, O. N. Sauls-bury, J. S. Trexler, A. M. DeHaas, James McGhee and E. C. Brown, who returned a verdict to the effect that Waltz came to his death by being struok on tbe head with a brace or piece of timber used in the construction of the railroad bridge of which Waltz was watchman. The timber struck the unfortunate man on the, front part of tho head crushing his skull' u such a manner that he died instantly. Crow* Kill a BlackBiiake. A Nittany Valley t**-^* \Tnock~1 of crows gathered about some object in a eld, and as they were making so much noise and fuss he concluded to investigate. On reaching the spot the farmer found a blaoksnake three and a half feet long crawling on the ground. When it is remembered that yesterday waB the 13th day of January, tbe fact of a farmer seeing a blacksnake in a meadow on that date is pruof enough that the season is very unseasonable. was wero The proprietors of tbe Tarboro* Southerner, Tarboro, N. C, write:-"Dr. Bull's Cough Syrup goes so fast our druggists i can't keep supplied." Girls and Their Photographs. Ladles' liomt Journal. Learn to Fay no when asked for your photograph by some one not espec'ally dear to you. There is in that little word much that will protect you from evil tongues. Learn to think that your face is too sacred to decorate tho apartment of Tom, Dick or Harry, no matter if each one of the tbreo is one of the pleasantest fellows in the world. When the sun imprinted in black and white, just how sweet and how dainty you look, it did uot mean that tho ptcturo should have incense in the shape of tobacco smoke, or dubious praise iu the form of a discussion of your points rendered to it. Give away your picturo with discretion. Remember that some day will como along Prince Charming, who will havo a right, tho right owned by the master of tho heart, to ask for the counterfeit presentiment of yourself after be knows that ho Sh going to havo the real girl for his own Think how mortified you would be if he should discover that the giving away of your photograph has brjcu almost as gcnoral as tho invitations to your Now Year's party. Think how ho will feel if he sees your face looking over tho mantle shelf in Dick's room-Diok whom ho knows to bo a braggart, and a man for whom ho has the utmost contcmpi!' Then just learn to say no Don't display your photographs to ^yonr men friends, aud you will not havo this unpleasant task; but if you should do it, and not have the courage to say tbe little monosyllable, be wise and refer them to p:>Pa- __________ Juttgu Kylley Burli-tl. I'uiLADKi.riiiA, Jan. lli.-Tho funcra of Uon. William D. Kelloy took place today. ReprotuuUtivcB from both Ilouses of Congress were present. Tho funeral services were held at the First Unitarian Church, aud the edifice was well fllled. Swaying la the Wiud. While tbe heavy gales of wind were sweeping over this city yesterday, the smoke stack at Hippie's planing mill swayed iu tbe wind s� alarmingly that the mill was shut down and the men went home. In Bald Eagle Valley the wind played havoc with fences, trees and small out buildings. Iteady for the Logs. Tbe boom company is pushing forward preparations for catching logs next spring and will soon have everything in readiness for the spring floods. The platformB which were constructed on the river bank in front of tbe Court House are ready to be launched at any time. J. M. Town's Body. A telegram received yesterday by Hon. J. W. Smith from Yuma, Arizona, stated that the body of J. M. Towns had been shipped from that place on Sunday. The body fa expected to arrive here Thursday night or Friday morning. Tbe Weather. Extremely cold weather is reported in the Northwest. At St. Vincent tho temperature last night was 18 degrees below zero. For to morrow colder, fair weather is indicated. The cold wave extends generally over the United States. Repairing a Steamer. Captain Shaw is making repairs to his steamer "City of Lock Haven" while it rests on the bottom of tbe canal. The improvements he is making will increase the speed of the boat considerably. Lady  Minltreli Co in Inc. On Saturday evening Duncan Clark's Lady Minstrels will be at the Opera House. Grand march of all nations, dolls quadrille and numerous lato novelties will be introduced.__ Fumiral Hotlco. Tho funeral of Airs. Sarah Wheelock will take plac� at Williamsport, to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock,  from the family residence on Upper Vino street. Lost Hia Pocket Book. A Reuovo man last his pocket book last week. The wallet contained money aud checks amounting to ejuOG. Old Buttons and gospender Buckles Give Them a Special Charm. Prom the New York Sun. The doings of Connecticut women have been the news staple of the State press for a week or more. Sometimes the arena of life in the Nutmeg State beonmes unbearably dull and staid and then it is always 8afe to count on tho"women folks" ; doing something to make things piquant and lively. The girls in Water bury started the week ith an absorbing sort of a "putty far oraze," and they made life a burden to tbe policemen of that town for awhile. The policemen naturally inferred that all tbe yonng ladies in the street had gone stark mad. Bevies of fascinating and beautiful girls were seen to dart suddenly into the street now and then, pounce upon something in the gutter or on the roadbed, pick it up, and then return to the sidewalk and trip serenely on. They were merely gathering raw material for the putty jar craze. One bewitching maiden fluently explainci what the putty jar business is. "It's lots of fun," said she; "you bet it is. Why you see, you get any kind of a jar, the cuter the better, find yon get your father or brother to roll out some putty and yon have him cover every part of the jar with putty. Have him stick it on about half an inch thick. It will stick on itself. Then you .have lots of sport. Stick everything you can think of and pick up the house, or yard, or street, on the putty and in every sort of odd designs. Old buttons and screws look pretty good and bits of dolls are awfully cute. What do you think I did? I stole a suspender buckle of my father's and jabbed it on the ar, and I have found lots of things on the street that look odd and cunning on the putty. Knickkuacks from the factories and odds and ends from the shops look geoj, too, and after you have got the jar all stack up, then you have It bronzed and varnished. That's all there is to tbe putty jar rase." A MILLIONS WILL How the Late John Shoenberger Disposed of His Property. HOW A BI& ESTATE IS DISTEIBUTED Resolutions of IUipect. WnBRKAs, It has pleased tho Great Giver of all good to remove ano'.ber of bis" workman from tbe field of his earthly la tor to hia nearer presence and eternal rest, Resolved, That wo recognize with leel-loga of sadness tho inroads of death npon our Alliance, aud that death, like the silent messenger that he is, has again brought sorrow to our hearts by shortening the chain that bound us together as a Christian band. Hesolved, That we offer to tbe bereft members of tbe family of our deceased brother our sincere sympathy, and for them our earnest prayer ib, that He wbo has promised to be tbe father to tbe fatherless and tbe husband to tbe widow, may afford them gracious consolation. ItciOlced, That a copy of these resolutions bo sent to tbe family of tbe deceased, recorded in the minutes of our Alliance, and published in the papers of our oity. Chas. W. Kiger, Cakhie E. Bkowk, Elma Armbtokg, Haiiby E. Fox, H. S. Satterlee. Hope Hose Heeling. A regular meeting of Hope Hose Company will be held this evening at 7:30 o'olook. Wben Ton Como to Think or It. Sighs and tears will never "pay arrears or duty. Nothinp is more likely to be crooked than a straight tip. Cindoralla found that a low menial position led to a bymenial ono. About tho only objection thus far to the new year is that it endB in naught. There is plenty of room at tbo top; when there Is little it will cease to be the top. Base ball was practiced by the ancients. Didn't Noah pitch within and without the ark? Seediness and popularity sometimes go together. Take tbo watermelon, for instance. My son, don't fret over your trials. The moro a plate of soup Is stirred the cooler It beoomes. It's paradoxical, perhaps, but It's true, tbat when a man gets the grip he is apt to lose bis grip. How mueb more agreeable tbe man wbo wants to soil than tbe man who wants to buy. Twenty-Eight Sick. Of the employes of the Queens Run Fire Brick Company, twenty eight men wero siok yesterday with Influenza and unable to work. The men wbo are well are many of them working double time in order to keep the works running. A Mean Young- Han. Having uo money to pay for tho hire of the cmtago iu which ho had just taken a lady friend driving, Arthur Matthows, of Pittsburg, sent tbe team baok to tbe stable iu the giri's care.  She was arrested and held. _ Colorcil People Can Snetle. Catering to tbe interests of the colored people, an exchange publishes  a half-eolumn editorial to prove that colored peo pie can sneezo, aud tlmt the grip is uo re-' specter of person aud attacks all alike. | -. .-- ]    Tbb Washington I'rest goes down into j its pistol pocket to observe tbat *'tho year 16V0 will probably witness a great triumph | of brains over boodle.   Keep your eyes The Relatives of the Dead Philanthropist Well Provided for, and the Religious Institutions Mot Forcotten-A HUllon Dollars for the Establishment of m Memorial Hospital at Pittsburg. New York, Jan. 18.-Millionaire John Shoenberger's will, and a ocdicil following, were filed for probate to-day. Shoenberger directs that bis widow, Alice E., reoeive three bouses with all tbe f nrnitore, works of art, bones, carriages and everything attached thereto, and 2,000 shares of Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago Rail road Company, 150 of the first mortgage, 1,000 7 per cent, ooupon bonds of tbe Allegheny Valley Railroad Company and $100,000 worth of 4� per cent. United States bonds. His widow and his nephew, Alexander T. Mason, are exeontors and trustees for his estate ia New York, and for tbe remainder of tbe estate the trustee is the Pennsylvania Company for the Insurance of Lives, with three executors. He directs that one-half of his interest in the Huntingdon furnace property in Pennsylvania shall be held in trust for his brother. George K. His two sisters, Anna M. Watts, of Philadelphia, and Elizabeth S. Luttle, of Blair county, P*., get $100,-000 each: eight relatives get *25,000 eaeb, and several Episcopal institutions are provided for. According to the will tbe prinoipal ob-jeot of Shoenberger's life was the establishment at Pittsburg of tbe St. Margaret Memorial Hospital as a memorial to bis ife. He bequeaths nearly one million dollars to it, and provides for tbe formation of a corporation to take charge of the institution. CHAT BY THE WAT. Items of Local and Genera] Interest Gathered by Out Reporters. Harrisburg is to bave a MoGinty ball. It is better to bave a turnip abas than a eabbage bead. Keep your bead cool aud your feet warm and avoid sickness. Whenever a girl elopes it is safe to set her down as flighty. "It's snow use," sighs the small boy as be longingly looked at hia new sled. Uneasy lies the head that has tha grip. And where is Mrs. MoGinty all this time? The sewer pipe trust has busted. It is predicted a heavy cut in prices will follow. Adam was tbe only man who had a wife mide to order, and even she turned out a misfit.-: There have been no frozen np water pipes in this town this wiuter, thank the weather. The young men will bave to hold on to their girls this winter, because they cannot let them slide. It would be a good thing for oar lee men to Invest their money in chemical process of making loe. Tbe favorite fad now being introduced among tbe ladies who oan be luxuriously languid ia to be rubbed two or three times a week with cocoa oil after a bath. It must be doae by a professional manipulator. " Whiskey and quinine is the best thing to stave it off," says the saloon keeper. " Keep it ont of the house by using plenty of coal and bavins your rooms well heated," says tbe eoal dealer. "Let me sell you some aotipyrine for it," says the druggist. "Keepwell wrapped np," is tbe advice of the clothier. "Tinted glasses will releive* the pain in the head," bints tbe oculist. " And above all things," urges the physician, "don't take any quack remedies, but get a doctor to prescribe for yon at once." HA WES MUST UANU. The Supreme Court of Alabama Affirms the Criminal Court Decision. . MftywwFw-a ta_ Jan__14.-=Ihfi_SjN a decision in tbe celebrated liawes case, rendered from the Jefferton Crimnial Court. Hawes murdered bis wife aud two little girls tn Birmingham last December a year' ago. His erime was the occasion of an assault on the jail of Jefferson County by a mob, into wbieh the sheriff fired and killed a number of men, including Postmaster Throckmorton, of Birmingham. Hawes was tried and convicted of murder in tbe first degree, and sentenced to be hanged last July. The case was appealed on a special plea for a change of venue and a new trial. The Supreme Court affirms the judgment of tbe oriminal court of Jefferson county, and the date of tbe original sen* tence having expired, fixes the 28th of February as the date of executioo. The Story of Johnstown. Mr. Miles Banes is now canvassing the oity for J. M. Place's "Story of Johnstown," the only complete and authentio history of tbe great d'saster yet published. Mr. Place was publisher of the Harrisburg Telegram at the time of the flood, and he and his corps of assistants were soon ou the ground and the accounts given by that publication were among the most truthful and graphic of tbe many published. Soon after tbe exoitement subsided be went to work gathering information aud data for compiling a complete history of Johnstown before and after the greatest and most dreadful deluge tbat has ever visited the Conemaugh valley. Our readers can depend on getting tbe best if they give Mr, Banes their order for a copy. It took long and weary weeks to have the history brought to the degree of completeness attained by the publisher, who some time ago resigned bis position of editor of the Telegram so as to give bis entire attention to bis historical work. It is profusely illustrated and will be published in three bindings, which retail from $2.25 to $3.75. The Jury Wheel in Motion. Tbe names of the men who will serve as jurors at the next term of court were drawn from the wheel this forenoon. Sixty names were drawn for traverse jurors for the first week in view of the ciJuie uu at tuai time.-mo uuuis uu^mu on Monday, February 24th, and will continue two weeks. Not at all Modest. Strange stories are told in Boston of the actions of James Frixier, mesmerist, who olaims to have Christ's power of working miraculous cures. The Hoop-skirt Coming Back.   -A fashion paper sees the shadows of ooming events and prediota an early return of tbe hoop-skirt. PKBSONAI.   PKSCILINQS. The Motion for a New Trial. Chicaoo, Jan. 13.-Before Judge Mc-Connell this morning tbe motion for a new trial iu the Cronin case came up, and Mr. Forrest, for the defense, asked tbat tbe argument be put off for a week, owing to the absence of Judge Wing, one of the dcfendautB' counsel. Any further delay was opposed by tbo State's Attorney, and after considerable discussion, court adjourned tho argument iu tbe matter until to-morrow. open for the triumph. Also for any boodlo which may bo lying around loose. The Temperatnre In Washington. Washington, Jan. 13 -The signal office reports that tbe mean temperature since yesterday noon has been sixty-four and a half degrees, boing twenty-four degrees higherthau has ever before occurred in Wasbiugton during the mouth of January. Tbe maximum temperature reached seventy five degrees, being five degrees higher than the previous maximum, whioh ocoured in January, 1876. H. T. Harvey, Esq., is oonflned to his bed by La Grippe. Rev. M. Power is oonflned to tbe house by a slight indisposition. Ex-Judge Frantz, of Sugar Valley, is reported seriously ill witb typhoid fever. W. B. Holloway is able to be oat again after an illness of six weeks with pneumonia. Harry Hall, Esq , is able to be out again after a brief illness with tha influenza. Willie Fox, wfco baa been a telegraph operator at Easton for some time, is visiting friends in this eity. John B. Kryder, of Flemington, is seriously ill witb pneumonia whlob resulted from an attack of influenza. . A). Sterner, one of Lock Haven's prom-nent yonng business men transacted business in Williamsport yesterday. Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Glenn returned hut night from Renovo where they attended tbe funeral of their little neloe Graee Glenn. John F. Meginneas, ex editor of the Williamsport Gazette and Bulletin has been granted a pension as a survivor of the Mexican war. Editor-in-chief Lambert, of the Philadelphia Inquirer, has resigned and goes to Europe to recuperate. Mr. Charles H. HeutiB sucoeeds him. Wilmer Klapp Is borne on a visit from Pittsburgh. He has just recovered from an attaok of la grippe, being confined to bis room for about two weeks. VV. J. King, of Williamsport, a gentleman wbo has many friends and acquaintances iu this oity, is tbe author of a text book called "Normal Outlines," whieb is worthy of a place in every school in tbe land. Mr. L. K. Pourt and family returned home yesterday afternoon from a visit with relatives at   Kingston,  Pa.  Mr. Foust was ill daring tbe whole visit of several weeks, but is able to attend to business again. Mrs. Binsley, mother of tbe Superintendent of the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad at Williamsport, E. B. West.'all, died yesterday evening at 5 o'olook, at tbe home of ber daughter, in the eightieth - year of her age.   

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Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication