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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: January 13, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - January 13, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                EIGHTH YEAK-NO. 2(J7 I^OGK HAVEN. PA., MONDAY, JAN U Alt Y FBICJE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS K1NSLOE ItKOTHEKS---PUBLISHERS THE l'KOroSEI* Mll>I>LK DISTRICT. Congressman McCorniick's bill to create a new Federal judicial district iu this State, to bo called the Middle district, bas been received with general approbation throughout the cooties concerned. Some errors have occurred in some of the newspaper statements, however. The counties named in the bill to constitute the now district are Lackawanna, Wyoming, Bradford, Tioga, Potter, Cameron, Clinton, Lycoming, Centre, Union, Snyder, Mifflin, Juniata, Northumberland, Montour, Columbia, Sullivan, Luzerne, Dauphin,Perry, Huntingdon,Fulton, Franklin, Adams, York, Cumberland, Lebanon and Clearfield. Here are twenty-eight counties, more than one-third the whole number in the State, and having quite one-third of the total population, with great business and material interests. It is provided that courts shall bo held at Scran ton beginning in March and September; at Williamsport, beginning in January and Juno, and at Harrisburg, beginning in May and October of each year, to contiuuo for such length of time as the judges Bhall determine. There will soon be convenient public buildings finished at Saranton and Williamsport, and Harris-risburg has one already. These are the available points of the district for the courts. A HURRICANE IN THE WEST St. Louis Experiences a Destructive Death' Dealing Cyclone. MY PEESOKS LOSE THEIR. LIVES CURRENT COMMENT. The death of Judge Kelley leaves William McKinley the foremost champion of Protection in the halls of Congress. By the way, the usual jokes about the "beautiful snow" Beems to have joined the late Mr. MoGinty and gone to the bottom of the sea. England pays in taxes $20 per head. The "United States pay 12.50. England is free trade; the United States are protection. The free trade mugwumps may find trouble in explaining this difference. We agree with the JVwo Bra, that the American people are fast coming to the opinion that Miss Gwendoline Caldwell ought to do one of the three things: Sho ought either to many Prince Murat, stop courting him through the newspapers, or come home, and they don't care a cent which of the three she does. Ik regard to the report that Mr. Cleveland got up and gave his seat ia a crowded elevated railroad car to a shop girl, the Chicago Heies says that no surprise need ba excited. Mr. Cleveland iB a very polite man. One day last spring he got up and gave his seat at Washington to an elderly gentleman from Indiana. The Pottsville Miners' Journal asks Senator Quay to make a declaration of his choice for Governor. The common understanding is that he prefers the people shall do that for themselves. The man who can unite the party, give vitality to the whole campaign and assure success from the beginning is the man who is wanted. Wilkes bar he is a remarkable town in some respects. It not only has a beautiful free public library, generously endowed, hut it has a dog catcher who actually catches dogs, and who during the past year not only "decimated"- that's the word the report uses-the howling yelping curs, but turned into the city treasury $1,250 in fees. What do you think of that, ye wise fathers? The Wine and Spirit Gazette of New York charges that the police captains of that city get more mocey in blackmaiiing the liquor dealers than they do as salary, and not one of them would resign if their entire salary was taken from them. This ia a grave charge, but notwithstanding its gravity, it is doubtless true, ana?the police captains will take no further notice of it possibly than to increase their levy. The coming municipal election is an important one to every citizen, and none but good men should be nominated for the several offices. Upon the wisdom and judgment of the persons chosen for councilman, school directors and the minor offices our prosperity and growth as a city largely depend. Attend the primaries of your party, whether you are a Republican or a Democrat. See that the best men of your ward are put on the ticket, and work to have them elected. Philadelphia, according to the Record, eats in the course of the year 200,000,000 eggs, of which seven-eighths come from Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota and Nebraska, packed in refrigerator cars holding 144,-000 each. Notwithstanding this brain food, Philadelphia is no better or wiser than other cities; but still the question arises, why cannot the farmers in the East pay more attention to the raising or dropping of eggs? We import egse in immense quantities and yet pay little attention to the development of home products. Farmers, keep an eye on the hen? j ISiE Buildings Oo Down Before the Terr)He BltMt-Church Steeples Topple Over and Wires Prostrated-An Illinois Town AIho Suffers From the Storm-A Wide Kwnth of Desolation. St. Louis, Jan. 12.-This afternoon a hurricane struck the city, unrooting houses, tearing out trees by the roots, blowing steeples off churches, leveling telegraph poles and doing considerable damage generally. All the Eastern tele graph wires centering at East St. Louit are blown down, and rumor comes from the littlo towu of Venice, three miles North of East St. Louis that several houses were destroyed there and three or four persons were killed, but this lacks confirmation. 10:30 p. m.-At this hour* it has been ascertained that several lives were lost during this afternoon's storm. Advices from the surrounding country aro delayed by the telegraphic service being crippled hy the storm. the track of tiie storm. The cyclone entered the city in its full force at Twenty-third street and Chauteau avenue, passing Northwest until it reached Seventeenth and Olive streets, where it swerved, taking a direct Easterly course to Fourteenth, and then again turned to the Northeast leaving the city and striking the river just North of the street. The only announcement of the approach and progress of the storm was by a dull, sullen roar, quickly followed by torrents of rain, which in turn was succeeded by sleet, and before the victims could realize what bad happened the storm had swept by and on. In addition to the dozens of dwellings and stores more or less wrecked, the following big buildings were damaged: BIG BUILDINGS DAMAGE!?. The Anchor Mills, Goodwin Candle Factory, Pullman's Shops, Van Urock'B Furniture Factory, Kingslaud & Fereu-kou Futiu Implement Works, Missouri Pacific Hospital, Hodge school, German Evangelical Church, Second Presbyterian Church and others yet to be heard from. Mrs. Charles Miller, who resides with her husband at Twentieth and Eugenia streets, was sitting in a rocking chair with her baby in her arms when the roof was lifted from her house. She rushed to the window and just then the wall gave iu and Mrs. Miller and her baby were buried under the debris. The babe miraculously escaped without a scratch, but the mother as badly hurt and may not recover. THE LIST of VICTIMS. The list of victims by the storm secured up to this hour (0:30 p. m.) are as follows: Dead: Mrs. Maggie Connors, Bernard McConnell, Joe Weaver, aged 9. Injured: Theresa Weaver, aged G. Both legs broken, will probably die. Sirs. Charles Miller, badly cut and bruised; seriously injured. Annie Connors, Maggie Connors, Francis Connors. A messonger just arrived from tho East side of the river says that tho storm iu 8t. Clair county, Illinois, was unusually severe, AT OTIIEIl POINTS. Brooklyn, a village of about 000 people, seems to have a uttered the most, as the damage at East St. Louis and at Venice was largely couiined to railroad property and small dwellings and telegraph and telephone poles. At Brooklyn, though several persons wereinjured, no lives were lost. A number of dwellings are in ruins, the Baptist church is entirely demolished and the M. E. church, a frame building, unroofed and turned clear around on its foundation. At Belleville, Illinois, several public buildings were unroofed, but no one is reported injured. a taw to enforce attoin'auce should ho passed without delay." A nut loss inler-uatinj; article is "A Field for Rich Women," by F run cos A. Shaw. Tho writer, in speaking of tho many charitable institutions founded and carried on by Mis. Q'liucy A. Shaw, of Boston, uses this beautiful sentiment: "If all endowed with wealth used the gifts of fortune as wisely as she, the problems uow agitating society aud threatening to uudermiue out-social system, would he easily solved, the great gulf botweeu tho rich and poor would be narrower, aud iu place of the present rancors and jealousies, a feeling of mutual respect and good will would exist. The publishers inform us that a large supply of similar matter has boon arranged for, and chat The Housekeeper will be better than over before. Tho December 15th will be one-quarter larger. If you are not a subscriber, send ten ccnis to tho publishers and mention our paper, aud receive The Housekeeper for o months (G numbers) as a trial; regular price $1.00 per year. "The Leading Ladles' Home Pitper." Surely, no other recommendation than tho following list of contributors is necessary to convince our readers that in homo papers, The Housekeeper, published semi monthly at Minneapolis, Minnesota, is by all odds the best. "Notes on Housekeeping," for tho November number is made upof sketches by Mrs. Presidcut Harrison, Mrs. Ex-Qovernor Martin, Mrs. Senator Ingalls, Mrs. Senator Morgan, Mrs. Sena-tos Bate, Mrs. John Sherman, Mrs. J. P. Richardson, and Mrs. S. P. Snider. "Our Current Comment." devoted to the Scientifio, Social, News and Artistic topics of tho day, is filled with matter unsurpassed by Century, ticribncr'fi, or Harper's; Emily Huntingdon Miller expresses, iu an able article, her views of Women Wage-workers. Canadian readers will ho particularly interested in Judge Mahouey'e NoLes on Annexation; Professur Bradloy on Compulsory Education, says: 'Efforts should be made by teachers, the public press, and all friends of intelligence aud good citizenship to retain pupils in school until they can be really educated, and that Williamsport News. From the GnzeLte ana Bullitln. Mrs. Sarah G. Whcelock, wife of the late David A. Wheclock, and mother of M. E. Wheelock, of the city hat store, died at her late resideuco, No. 919 Vine street, yesterday at 1:30 o'clock in tho afternoon. Notice of tho funeral will be given later. The firm of Crecvy ifc Snyder, the well known plasterers, who have the contract for plastering the State Normal School of Lock Haven, will send a crew of workmen to that city to-day to commence the work of lathing of the main part of thit structure. They will put on the first co

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