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Lock Haven Express Newspaper Archive: January 11, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Lock Haven Express

Location: Lock Haven, Pennsylvania

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   Lock Haven Express (Newspaper) - January 11, 1890, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania                                EIGHTH YEAB-NO. 266. LOCK HAVEN, PA., SATURDAY, JANUABY 11, 1890. PRICE-TWO CENTS. EVENING EXPRESS �IN SLOK BROTHERS - . PUBLISHERS CURRENT COMMENT. Have you kept your pledges, op to date?      _, The reported eold waves get wasted be fore tbey reach as. Next summer's greatest luxury will probably be iee water. The usual January thaw has been postponed. There is nothing to thaw. Mary Anderson sings mam when asked about that matrimonial engagement. The new Brazilian government has done one good thing at least in issuing that deoreo proclaiming the separation of the church and state, and guaranteeing religious liberty and equality to all. The New York Sun exclaims: "The Democracy unit stsnd by universal suffrage." Why not add that the Democracy most stsnd by fairsuifrage and on honest counts. That would be the cream of the matter.   _ Last week the man who assisted assasiu Booth to escape across the Potomac was found to be employed at the Washington Navy Yard, and was dismissed. He waa appointed daring the Cleveland administration. � Theke are forty-fonr national banks in Philadelphia and an aggregate capital of 23,568,000. The Individual deposits account show an inareaae of over 15,000,000 within the past twelve months and now atands at (85,367,619. The Punzsutawney Spirit strikes a responsive chord in the average heart when it says there is nothing in this world more touehingly pathetic than to see a self-sacrificing patriot trying to resist the eloquent and tearful importunities of bis friends who insist upon his being a eandi-date for office. The North American Review paid Mr. Blaine and Mr. Gladstone each (1200 for the articles that appear in the current number, which is at the rata of 1120 a page; The ordinary writer receives $8, ,10 or $13.50 a- page lrom ttitB magazine, according to the value and character of his contribution. Cosghessmas Rahdam, keeps himself thoroughly posted on all that is going in politics and public affairs, by reading the leading papers of the country, Congressional debates and personal correspondence. This manner of life is said to be doing him some good and hopes are expressed that he will be brought round. Miss Ellen Bayard the youngest daughter of the late Secretary of State, is engaged to marry Count Lewenhanpt, ol Sweden, who at the age of twenty-five years is studying practical mechanics with the Harlan & Hoilingaworth Company in Wilmington. The lady is aged twenty-one. They have known eacb other for some time. Count Lewenhaupt belongs to a distinguished Swedish family, and was an attaebe of the Swedish Legation at Washington during Mr. Bayard's term as Secretary of State. 1* Grippe's Hold. The influenza or "grip" as it is often atyled, is confining a great many persona in doors at present. As a general thing the disease is of a mild type, yet there are a number of people who are qaite sick, and under the physicians care. In the neighboring towns and villages of Dunns-town, Flemington, Mill Hall, Beech Creek and in fact all through the county people are sick with the influenza, and there are but few families in which some . of the members are not down witb the SUNDAY SERVICES. THE CROHN SUSPECTS Seasons Filed in the Support of the Motion for a Sew Trial S0HE OF THE POTUf8 OF 00UH8EL Tlw Jury Alleged to Have Seen Improper, and Judge Lsngenecker cherfed With Improper Instructions to the Jury-The Kalffuafystsry-Hoth the Accused Leave Trenton. Chicago, Jan. 10.-Late this afternoon Attorneys Wing, Donahue and Forrest filed  motion for a new trial in the case of Coughlin, Burke, O'SuUivan and Kunze, convicted of the murder of Dr. Cronin. The motion assigns thirty-nine causes of error in the ruling of Judge McConnell during the trial of the case. The grounds of the alleged error embrace every point contested by the attorneys for the defense, and range from an objection to the court's over-ruling tbe motion to quash the indictments upon the assertion that the defense has since the trial discovered new evidence whioh entitles them to a new trial. The first error alleged is that the court erred in overruling the motion to quash the indictment made on behalf of each of the defendants. The denial of Conghlin's motion for a separate trial is made the basis of four of the alleged errors, there being a separate count for eacb of the defendants. The refusal of the Court to permit the defense to show that Mills, Ingbam and Hynes were employed in the prosecution by private parties who were actuated by improper motives, is alleged to have been prejudicial to the defendants; the Court allowing these three lawyers to assii t in proseoution is said to be an error. Mr. Hynes is made the subject cf a special count In the motion in whioh he is said to have been moved by a spirit of personal hostility toward Coughlin, Burke and O'SuUivan, and was not fit to act as a prosecuting attorney. The over-ruling of the challenge for cause preferred by the defendants whose names are Riven in the motion, is further alleged to be an error. Side remarks Were made by the Slates Attorney' while examining. Tbe jurors are charged to have been improper. Judge Longeneoker's statement to tbe jury is oited as an error, and characterized as improper and illegal, and prejudicial to the rights of tbe defendants. It is also alleged to be an error in the case for the failure of the Court to enforce the rule excluding witnesses for the State from the court room during the trial. It is charged that improper remarks of counsel for the State excited the psssions and prejudices of the jurors against the defendants. It is charged as error that the prosecution was permitted to introduce as evidence an exhibit to tbe jury of the clothing, Instruments and hair of Dr. Cronin, tbe false teeth, tbe trunk and all the material evidence In tbe case. Tbe introduction of Dr. Cronin's knives, after the State had closed Its case, Is said to have been in error. The objeotion is made to a number of the instructions given to tbe jury by tbe court. The verdict is pronounced as contrary to law and not justi-fled by tbe evidence, and finally it is said that the defendants and each one of them have discovered evidence which entitles them to a new trial. Ala, Wednesday night by Sam C. Creamer the tusrsbel of the town, was a senss-tiona! affair. It was a duel to tbe death in the street. There bad been bad blood between them ou account  xibe>.e*naW4ryel!�d�dsod Silver for tbe worlds' ssrii|aeessasahVoo a circulating median of exchange- tad a protective tariff that makes Nsltnair thrift and the saoei raeuseerativs labor-in tbe world.' ;.--v.-.i.�::j.i2i  -!�.::� State Fatriotuon aad �q*ifliUBul*. . State ediniiiistraxaMpertateJnf tots*) protection of publio streams and gsesarai welfare ot its people would, on business prin-eiples, include tbeobtsianngor StstePsrk; Forest and Stream, and the^ loutUS of a State Capitol In the centra ol tbe State, or adjacent thereto^ for the most, lasting benefits to this aad fatarS generations. We bave, without railroad x facilities extensive valleys; desirable elevations for mountain homes, towns aad cities, in fact it can be truly said that Central Pazuujl-vania possesses aostue diversities In.mbaot-aim, valleys andeudowedsnuros'otwealth adjacent thereto for. the most profitable -diversified emsloynteat of say ptaae- on tbis continent, and that thebnildbsgof tbe central link railroad. to East and Western roads would establish the wherewith trade to earn reliable dividends in tbe new and old investments. For tbe people's object lessons and roeritorions State pride we need aad will obtain a Modem State Metropolitan City with Parks, Forest sod Stream,' by the.law of. equity; teat will mark oar State is highest ranks of civilization. James Wouisdis. Jan. 10,1890. The Closing; HeSSloa.'.. - The dosing session - of .Distriot Lodge called to order at 2:40 p. m.., and the regular Distriot .(jeremooiea prcaseedad, with. Col. Sobeiski made a short speech -touching on the work of the SuboroUnate Lodge, with its proprieties and improprieties. The finance and auditing committee reported, ssd on moUonwereaooepted. Remarks by D. T.: Morgan. > Letterswere received froaa several offtcesv regzetting their inability to attend on socoeaVof the "Grip." Brother Sobeiski wasitsnesved a oordial vote of thanks for his great assistant at tlw session. The report of lodges by tbeir delegates was received, showing an increasing interest in tbe work A selection of mnale by sister sb*. Carrie Brioker was very seeepUUe as was the recitation of sister Gertrude Busk. A vote of thanks was tendered the- l�nk Haven Loige for their kindness .and: hospitality during the convention. Tbsisseeioa closed at 4 p. m. to meet in July at Meatoors-ville. m.a. s. MBWS OF THK SATIOK. By the breaking of a easslon of the new Louisville and Jefieraonville bridge at Louisville, Kentucky, Thursday evening,' fourteen workmen wen-drowned. ,: A dispatch from Burlington, Iowa, says that places above and below that point on -the Mississippi river are sertoualytoreat-ened with a water famine; that the;- river is eight inches lower that it has been during the past sixty years, and that It is still falling fast. . 'r\ A Chicago dispatch says that L. P. Beo-ville, a nepbew of Gulteeu, the sissssin of President Garfield, eld ereretary  of a. local building eseoclstloa, be�elsies)ejiied and that bis accounts are short over *9,-000. Gambling and extravagance are said to bave oansed bis downfall.'  ' At half-past 4 o'clock Thursday morning one of the walls of the new Presbyterian church on Tbroop avenue, Brooklyn, fell or was blown down upon a three*tory frame dwelling adjoining. Two persons were killed, David Pntdy, aged 16 yssrs, and Maiy Purdy, aged 15. Four others were injured. Tbe cbnroh will bave to be rebuilt. �.> The fast mail tram on the Union PaciBo Railroad was wrecked gear .-.Sidney, Nebraska, Thursday, by a broken; rail. Tbe two mail cars and the bag gate ears were burned. Host of the mail aad all ol tbe basgage and express matter were destroyed. Tha passengers managed to get out of tbe sleepers ia tbeir night elotbes. Some of tbem were braised, tot -.none ' were seriously hurt. Tlajsysje SSsel111 Dobbins waa seriously injured. Governor Lowery, of MajSisslppi, sent his annual message to the LegSsUtaie Thursday. HereooarmendeoV nwr* stringent laws to prevent the earryisgeiV concealed deadly weapon^ expressed'disapproval of suoh disgraceful scenes as those enacted at the Sullivan Kdrain' prize fight last July, and denounoed asr slanderous the charges reflecting opoe tbe manner of conducting the State eleetioaeeieee 1881. Boring the test two years tsA.reeslits ax. ended the dtsbojaetaents ora�> |9I9,000.   

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