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Bucks County Courier Times Newspaper Archive: September 20, 1974 - Page 1

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Publication: Bucks County Courier Times

Location: Levittown, Pennsylvania

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   Bucks County Courier Times (Newspaper) - September 20, 1974, Levittown, Pennsylvania                               Open cabinet x .5 session is right on cue By CARL La VO Courier Times Staff Writer HARRISBURG when do we begin this silly. God damn exer- boomed John Pennsylvania's secretary of educa- tion. He grinned broadly as reporters and cameramen snapped to atten- tion in the front row seats of the Wil- liam Penn Memorial Museum audi- torium here. Pittenger strode into the sparsely filled chamber at exactly 2 the scheduled beginning of Gov. Milton Shapp's cabinet session. On Time It was to be the first such meeting of the 16-member executive body to Sunshine Law. briefcase in one hand and leaning on a wooden cane in the was the only cabinet member to arrive at the I appointed time. should have known better than to think everyone would be on he laughed as he spied a clus- ff ter of Harrisburg reporters he knew. Five minutes later Helene Woh- secretary of public welfare. p drifted into the auditorium. big news today is I got into a dress I couldn't get into last she joked to a team of television report- on Page Col. _L. J_ .1 TT Tt Second secrecy charge filed The five Middletown supervisors who were charged with violation of the Sunshine Law have been charged again. This time Township Manager James Dillon was too. The second charges stem from a criminal complaint filed by the Bucks County Courier Times which was present at the Wednesday meeting when the public was asked to leave the room. The second charge names the five supervi- sors and Dillon. They were filed before Justice of the Peace Richard Garber. The paper is being represented by Francis Sullivan of the' and Ballow law firm. The supervisors also can expect summonses from the office of Justice of the Peace Domin- ick Spadaccino. Mrs. on Page Col. There's nothing quite like a picket line these especially in Lower Bucks County. there was the NOW group picket- ing Council Rock Intermediate School soccer practice. NOW wants the world to know Margot Bayer of Churchville should be allowed to be a mem- ber of the CR school soccer team. Margot is practicing with the rest of the that is. And some more bad news for consumers. An apparent massive lobbying effort by business and industrial interests has killed a proposed federal consumer at for the present. A filibuster by that's a lot of hot you doomed a Senate try to pass the much-needed legislation yesterday. The House had passed the bill by an over- whelming margin and Senate membprs favored it 2-1. Majority opinion ends up blown away by political hot air. That must figure. It could happen only in America. And only in our Phils went from pennant contenders to an also-ran in just six days. It's not the first time the Phils have lost a war in six days. Or is the memory of 1964 still too painful to bring Let's hope the Eagles don't try to follow that act for six And even Governor Shapp opened his cabi- net meeting to the oublic vesterdav. in romnli- ance with the new state Sunshine Law. What's good for the one would would be good for Middletown Township and other governing bodies in Lower Bucks. J.H. f v w VOL. No. 259 Bgchs County F.-am fa. 19051 SEPTEMBER 1974 52 PAGES B C FIFTEEN CENTS Dislike new wage schedule Bucks health workers feel 'ill ByLORETTAA.HEARN Courier Times Staff Writer Over 60 county health depart- ment employes joined forces last night and battled county officials over what they felt were injustices of the newly adopted wage sched- ule. The board of health meeting provided the forum for senior raw at the thoughts of their titles having been down-graded and sal- ary increases denied. The crowd argued their years of faithful service to the county meant nothing in the scale of wages prepared by Pace Asso- ciates of York. This association is an outside firm hired by the county commis- for county employes. Denver Lin- dley Jr the minority commission- attended the meeting and ex- plained previous methods of or- ganizing pay including the merit were and He said the Pace study was an effort by the county to obtain and objective and com- parative list of pay ranges. Lindlev's HH o appease the employes who felt they had been underrated by Pace. Dr. Edmund K. Linde- medical director of the department of said that he and members of the health board met with county officials yester- day morning and submitted rec- ommendations concerning sala- ries Members of the board refused to comment to the nature of the but Lindemuth contributed the fact that they hope to put certain classes of people in better pay ranges. Employes questioned when they would receive a pay increase on Page Col. Living costs soar 7c during August WASHINGTON Con- sumer prices rose 1.3 per cent in August on the crest of higher costs for mortgage meats and medical the Labor Department said today But gasoline prices declined for the first time since last September. The Consumer Price Index reached 150 2 that goods and services that cost in 1967. cost in August The rise in the index was the largest since February and the increase was unusual for a month when prices normally decline. The index was 11.2 per cent higher than a year ago The government also reported that because of the increase in consumer prices ana a reauc- tion in the work the real spendable earnings of an average worker with a family hit the lowest level since 1970. The Bureau of Labor Statis- tics data on consumer prices also included some good noting lower prices for fresh dairy products and in addition to gasoline and oil. Increases for eggs and pork were much larger than usual for August and poultry and fresh fruit prices went up at a time when they normally go down. The index for nonfood com- which also normally drops in increased 1.4 per cent. Higher prices for clothes caused most of the but there were also increases on household housekeeping alcoholic fuel oil and coal and used cars. New car prices also increased slightly instead of going down at the end of the model year. Gasoline Lower The Labor Department said that the average price for regular grade gasoline declined 08 per cent to 55.4 cents per gallon and the average price for premium gasoline declined 0.6 per cent to 59.1 cents per gallon in August. A wide range of prices for on Page Col. Pickets CR practice NOW kicks up soccer fuss By PATRICIA PICONE Courier Times Staff Writer Members of local chapters of the National Organization of Women picketed soccer practice at the Council Rock In- termediate School in Richboro yesterday afternoon to protest the exclusion of player Margot Bayer on the basis of sex. While 25 NOW members picketed for an hour by the edge of the soccer field. 13-year-old Margot from New Road. Church- ville. was practicing kicks and goals with male teammaies. Michael Lowe. NOW co-chair- rridn for education and his wife. Rorie. said the group decided to picket two days ago. was the day they wouldn't let Margot practice on the field. But this mat- ter has beai one of our concerns for a long Picket Again will picket again if we have Lowe added yesterday. The eighth grade Churchvifle girl was dropped from the soccer team last year after she had played three when an op- posing team objected to her presence on the team. According to the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Associa- tion girls and boys may not compete or even practice to- gether in the same sport. The PIAA and the Council Rock district were named as co-defen- dents in a suit in August of this year by Margot and her James F. filed in U S Dis- trict Court and backed by the American Civil Liberties Union. the school district to abide by federal and state not by the said Ms. Lowe. PIAA performs valuable functions but it is a voluntary or- ganizan'oa It is controlled by vol- not the NOW members will be present at the next school board meeting on Oct. 7 to show support for Margot and to urge the school board to oppose the PIAA's rules. In the Margot wifl be the subject of a special admin- istrative hearing with school offi- cials and the school board within next four or five ac- on Page Col. Bridge travel If you travel the bridges of Lower Bucks County during rush you can appre- ciate these pictures on page 13. INDEX Birthdays.........................51 .Bidding......................22-25 Business..........................16 Classified.....................39-50 Comics............................51 Editorial............................6 Enjoy Yourself................33 Entertainment.............33-37 Features..........................13 Happenings.....................32 Investor...........................16 Jacoby.............................51 Living..........................14-15 Lottery..............................4 Movie Schedule................36 Night Lights.....................34 Obituaries........................26 School Menus..................38 Sports..........................27-32 TV Review......................37 TV Schedule....................37 Wilson.............................35 Your Government..............5 Day Classified 943-1000 Night Classified 946-4600 Night City Desk 943-1004 37 STICK IN THE MUD The ore ship ran aground today in the Dela- ware River off Burlingtyon Island. John Mcllvaine and Ron both of Courier Times photo by Ron Brown Bristol were just two who watched tugs free the vessel. See story page 2. Ford asks billion cut in long-range U.S. spending WASHINGTON De- claring that budget restraint remains a in the battle against inflation. President Ford today asked Congress to cut back or postpone about billion in long-range government spen- ding. In a special message to Ford said that his request was the first in a series of such proposals and a key step in his administration's goal of reducing government spend- ing and achieving a balanced budget. Budget Director Roy L. Ash told reporters Thursday that another request for cuts or delays in spending of billion will be sent to Congress in the next few days. He said the two requests totaling about billion will cover some 100 budget items. The President's message said unless Congress follows his proposal for a billion deferral in these long-range federal spending will increase by nearly million in the current fisal year. ore he would rise by over billion in 1976 and even more in the first year in which the new procedures for congressional review of the on Page Col. Sought Mohollen resignation Catania loses authority fight Courier Tune photo by Pitrltli Plcone MARGOT BAYER YELLS TO SOCCER PLAYERS she practiced yesterday while NOW members picketed By MARY ANN SILL Courier Times Staff Writer A request from authority mem- ber and County Commissioner Joseph F. Catania calling for the resignation of Executive Director Charles Mohollen was turned down by the Morrisville Municipal Catania said yesterday. In an executive session held Sept. the authority outvoted him and declined to ask Mohollen -i-C iUi- lowing a public authority meeting. Mohollen was reportedly not present at the closed session held to discuss charges and personnel involved with dumping concen- trated sludge in the Delaware River. The board has maintained MOiioueii will not be fired. The authority yesterday refused to discuss the daily dumping practice under investigation by the state Department of Environ- mental Resources Members also offered no an- swer when Kevin who said he was fired from his sewer plant job for notifying the countv health ooard oi tne asked for reinstatement and compensation for nearly a month of work he has missed. In the authority ig- nored two bills on the meeting agenda that stem from the sludge problem one bill for tanking sludge and another for filling in a swamp area. When asked why the bills were brushed Chairman Ralph Coker said he did not make up the agenda and puld not discuss the bills. he added bills will be JOSEPH CATANIA live session was replayed yester- day when Catania refused to sup- port who announced there would be no discussion of the Page Col.   

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