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Lebanon Daily News Newspaper Archive: November 17, 1977 - Page 1

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Publication: Lebanon Daily News

Location: Lebanon, Pennsylvania

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   Lebanon Daily News (Newspaper) - November 17, 1977, Lebanon, Pennsylvania                                Lebanon la 106th Year No 60 LEBANON THURSDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 15 CENTS Syria Objects To Sadats Journey Parade Money Turned Down The Lebanon Community Holiday Parade committee has told City Council to keep its money that it does not want a contribution from the city for the ThanksgivingChristmas parade next Tuesday The decision by the holiday parade committee came after Council approved a resolution giving the committee for the parade if the plan is ap proved by the city solicitor and after a strict accounting of parade funds The contribution would have been made this year only We rejected the money be cause there were so many am biguities in connection with it There was also a lot of vindic tiveness and the attitude of cer tain members of City Council was very Fred Williams of WAHT Radio and chairman of the committee told the Daily News We might have accepted it if Mayor George Heverling had said There might be a problem legally but in the spirit of Thanksgiving and Christmas ContlnuKl on 1 Visit Is Still On Despite Objection DAMASCUS Syria UPI Egyptian President Anwar Sadat said today he was going to visit Jerusalem despite objec tions from Syrian President Hafez Assad who said the plan deeply hurt I am going I always mean what I Sadat told a news conference in Damascus Assad did not attend the news confer ence although he later saw Sadat off at the airport This time we ended our City Budget Needs Cuts For Balancing By BERNARD SHIRE Daily News Staff If the city of Lebanon had to pass a budget tomorrow it would have to hike taxes by three mills in order to balance it Happily for both city coun cilmen and the Lebanon tax payers the first reading of the budget is not required until Nov 28 and the citys operating plan will not have to be approved in final form until the end of the year Although the councilmen could approve a deficit budget at the first reading in a week and a half the officials hope to have expenditures and receipts in balance before that Last night Council met for the fourth time for the purpose of coming up with a budget for 1978 Atthe end of the meeting a deficit of more than still existed The councilmen seemed hopeful that they would be able to trim the budget back by Nov 28 Last year at this time the budget was almost half a mil lion dollars out of Revenues Down Expected revenues are down from last year in several areas sale of property and payments of water and sewer monies to the general fund The city sold a lot of property it owned during 1977 but has not yet found a buyer for the old Independent fire hall This transaction would have brought additional money into the coffers Salaries A Problem How much money to plug into the budget for employee salaries has also been a source of difficulty for the councilmen The negotiations between the police and the city administra tion went into arbitration last Friday but a final arbitration has not been handed down yet George Christiansen the citys labor attorney told the council men that they could plug ap proximately seven percent into the budget for police salaries More definite figures are ex pected early next week when the arbitration settlement should be handed down Councilman Nofie Catalano asked that the citys contribu tion to the police pension fund be increased The city now gives about annually and by law could give up to However there is a provision in the iaw that allows the city to make a separate contribution for the pensions of policemens widows Catalano proposed that the surolus that may exist in the citys federal re Contlnutd on 4 meeting in disagreement un like on previous Assad told reporters at Damas cus Airport following Sadats departure Sadats plan to visit Israel deeply hurt me because I was unable to convince him of the dangers and far reaching reper cussions for the Arab cause and Arab be said We did not reach agreement on my Sadat said after his talks with the Syrian leader I did not inform him be forehand and he is not pleased I am going But although we dis agreed on tactics we will not disagree on However when asked about this Assad replied that it is not easy to separate between strategy and The disagreement between the two nations left opento what extent the Jerusalem trip could sow dissension in Arab ranks Sadat descried as suggestions the disagreement spelled a new rift between Egypt and Syria the two most important con frontation states facing Israel Arab solidarity will not give in to analyses and defeatist Sadat said The announcement caused a sensation in the Arab Sadat will be the first Arab leader to visit Israel since the Jewish state was founded in 1948 Assad did not attend the news conference at the guest palace where Sadat was staying We did not reach agreement on my Sadat said I did not inform him beforehand and he is not pleased I am going President Assad is opposed But although we have disagreed on tactics we will not disagree on Describing his planned trip to the Jewish state as a sacred the Egyptian leader said he decided on the move after his recent trip to Romania Iran and Saudi Arabia He returned from the tour on Nov 3 All during the trip it was cooking in my he said adding that when he returned the first person to know was his foreign minister Ismail Fahmi He denied that he had discus sed the move with the Ameri cans or the Saudis before taking his decision Why should I tell them he asked Sadat was asked if a military confrontation would be inevita ble in the event the visit proves a failure No a military solution will not be me definite outcome in case the visit he said But reiterating his statement before the Egyptian parliament last week he said I want to address the Knesset to confront them with the truth and then they can decide for themselves Continued on Ptje S Imports To Hike Prices Higher Food Costs Seen WASHINGTON UPI In creased charges by middlemen and higher costs for imports will boost food prices for Ameri can consumers as much as 6 percent in 1978 the Agriculture Department said today And for the second year in a row consumers will pay more to get the food from the field to the grocery store than they pay the farmer to grow it Kenneth Farrell head of the agencys Economic Research Service said farmers would see little benefit from the price in creases receiving the same billion for feeding America they have received each of the past five years The expected increase in food prices will be slightly below the percent rise endured by con sumers this year Farrell told the departments annual Out look Conference today Increased prices for sugar spurred by a higher govern ment import fee will account for part of the food price in crease Rising coffee prices alone ac Drawing To Fill School Board Seat Seems Likely By CEDRIC KURTZ Education Editor It seems probable now that the seat on the Cornwall Lebanon School Board held by George Brubaker will be filled by a drawing Of the four legitimate writein candidates who each received one writein vote for the seat two have indicated that they are interested in the seat and one said he is still considering The need for a drawing came about when no one filed for the remaining two years of Norman LAZBOY SHOWCASE SHOPPE AT RECLINER CITY NOVEMBER SALE 417 W MUn Ptlmyn Open Man Thru Stt Hemperlys sixyear term When Hemperly resigned in April George Brubaker wasap pointed to fill the term However neither Brubaker nor anyone else took action to place his name on the ballot for the position The law reads that when a school board term is va cated before it expires that of fice is up for grabs at the next municipal election A school board member can only be ap pointed to fill an unexpired term until the next municipal elec tion Neither Party Filed Since Hemperly resigned after the deadline for filing in the primary election the only way a candidate could have had his name placed on the ballot was for the party to file nomina tion papers In hit behalf by Sept 19 Neither party filed nomina tion papers for the twoyear term As a result six persons re ceived one writein vote each on the ballot One of those GeneFuhrman is ineligible because he is not a resident of the Cornwall Lebanon School District Fuhrman lives in the Seventh Ward of the city Another Charles Mellinger current president of the board was unopposed for a sixyear term in the election If Melling er were to resign his sixyear term and enter a drawing for the twoyear term he would stand the chance of not being on the board at all Of the remainingfour writein candidates Arlene A Fan covic 19 Horst said she is not interested in the seat fContfmiwt on 3Col 1 counted for about half of this years overall grocery in crease Food prices increased per cent in 1976 Labor costs for grocery clerks processing workers and others involved in marketing food reached million this year the first time those costs have topped the farm value of foods Farrell predicted that in 1978 labor costs again would ex ceed the value of food at the farm level Farrell said middlemens charges are going up because food industry wages will proba bly rise 7 to 8 percent next year and food industry firms will be faced with higher costs for ener gy packaging materials and transportation In addition he said rising consumer income will increase consumer food demand And as incomes rise the expert said consumer demand for food ser vices like processing will put in creasing pressure on retail prices WEATHER Partly cloudy and colder to night Lows 35 to 40 Partly sunny breezy and cool Friday Highs 4S to 50 Today In The NEWS Action 4 Underlining the farmers dif ficulties Farrell said consum ers in 1974 paid billion for foods which brought fanners billion Next year farmers will get about billion while con sumers pay a total of bil lion the economist said Supplies should be plentiful Farrell said Shoppers can ex pect a slight decline in total beef supplies but big supplies of corn and other livestock feeds indicate production of high grade grainfed beef will be up CEMETERY SITE buildings and shrubbery depict ing part of a masterplan for the Ft Indiantown Gap National Cemetery are examined by Carl Noll director of the Veteran Administrations National Cemetery System and State Adjutant General Nicholas P Kaf kalas The two men were present at Ft Indiantown Gap yesterday for the unveiling of the masterplan for the proposed cemetery The local national shrine would be only the second national cemetery to be established since 1950 Gap Natl Cemetery Plans Are Unveiled ByCURTSUTHERLY Daily News Staff Everything shown here today can and will be said Phillip D Simons a land scape architect in charge of en vironmental planning and de sign for the Ft Indiantown Gap National Cemetery Simons was speaking yesterday before several hundred persons in cluding members of the press who attended the unveiling of plans for the new national shrine The briefing held at in the Gaps National Guard 103rd Maintenance Co Armory Building included a slide presentation detailing ar chitectural changes in land scaping and the placement of buildings and roadways One of the key features of the national cemetery will be the use of solar power for heating the various installations Com menting on the soiar energy usage was Alva Hill a design architect working closely on the project with Phillip Simons 60 Heating From Sun According to Hill at least 60 percent heating efficiency will be obtainable within the various cemetery installations from so lar power alone Included among these buildings will be an administration building a personnel center a colum barium for cremation and a number of satellite maintenance structures at key locations around the cemetery site The 66 percent efficiency Hill said will be obtainable throughout most of a normal Pennsylvania winter However should there be a prolonged period of cloudiness the cemetery buildings will be able to obtain additional heat from thermal pumps built into the system These pumps Hill pointed out will help to preheat return air to the system there by boosting the overall heating Backup Oil Furnace If this should prove inade quate a backup oil furnace will be on standby within each of the buildings although Hill noted that he didnt expect their use to be frequent You have to realize that these buildings are being de signed to accommodate solar the architect said These arent just buildings on which well be placing solar As an example of the extent of the solar heating systems one building personnel contain 775 square feet of solar collector panels on a roof that slopes at about a 45degree angle But solar power according to Phillip Simons is just one way in which the national cemetery will utilize the natural environ ment Also put to use will be the contour of the land Will Interact With Land During a detailed slide pre sentation Simons pointed out how the projected road systems in and around the cemetery site three miles long will be graded and allowed to interact with the contours of the sur rounding land The shrine roadways will move through wooded sections circle around hills and accord ing to Simons generally add to the serenity and beauty of the existing site All of he said while indicating the cemetery plan will be in keeping with the dig nity of a nations Simons further explained that in only a few locations will the lay of the land actually be changed One of these sites will be where a cemetery through way will underpass Cumber land Road an already existing twolane highway Natural stone will be used for construc tion purposes at that location Simons noted Other changes in landscape will include the creation of one or more new bodies of water within the cemetary grounds These Simons said will not only add to the beauty of the Continued on 6 Penna Weather Could State Respond If Crisis Hits Again Last of three articles By SCOTT MacLEOD HARRISBURG UPI Two natural catastrophes battered Pennsylvania during 1977 rais ing doubts about how well the state will respond if disaster strikes again in 1978 We were a little ad mits Lt Gov Ernest Kline who directs state emergency opera tions as chief of the Civil De fense and Energy councils Others would not be so temp erate in their criticism of the states recovery efforts this year When barges bringing home heating oil to southwestern Pennsylvania became stuck in icecovered rivers during last Januarys cold wave panic stricken Fayette County Com missioner Fred Lebder wanted help and he wanted it fast Lebder asked Civil Defense to supply tank trucks from the local Army depot to deliver emergency oil to his con stituents Finally three days later the trucks were cleared for use Last July when Rep Adam Bittinger DCambria arrived in downtown Johnstown to sur vey damage caused by the killer flood he couldnt believe his eyes The local Civil Defense direc tor was standing helplessly alone in a washedout building with no communications and no idea where the mayors com mand post was located Bitting er said Because of such bureacratic bungling in time of crisis the state legislature investigated the Civil Defense and Energy councils and is now considering proposed reforms A bill awaiting action on the Senate floor would rename Civil Defense so it would be the Office of Emergency Preparedness Thats supposed to change its image of a cold war air raid drill outfit to one geared to deal with natural disasters The most significant reform would require local Civil De fense directors to be trained Critics say many unqualified persons are appointed in pay ment for political favors The proposal would also give local directors authority to act during crises without waiting around for the permission of higherups in state government This is supposed to prevent bureaucratic bungling The rest of the proposals are mostly guidelines that the Civil Defense could have adopted and followed on its own such as pro viding technical assistance to local Civil Defense posts The General Assembly is con sidering a bill also a direct result of last winters cold wave that would give the Energy council statutory authority Currently it is a governors ad visory panel without real power The proposed law would ena ble the council to close down businesses to conserve energy during fuel shortages Last year state officials were in a quan dary to justify closing the schools but not taverns and massage parlors The council would be empo wered to order fuel distributed to critical users as in the Fay Contfmwd on 3 GRAND OPINING CANDLI OUTLIT 769 CUMBERLAND ST LOCAL MADE CANDLES ALL SALE PRICED   

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