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Kane Weekly Leader Newspaper Archive: March 1, 1888 - Page 1

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   Kane Weekly Leader, The (Newspaper) - March 1, 1888, Kane, Pennsylvania                                VOLUME HINUMBER 36 KANE THURSDAY MARCH PER ANNUM 15 ADVANCE BUSINESS CARDS V si OKU ATTORNEYATLAW FBALEV STREET KANB PA pEOKQEM Dim OFKICB os FBALEY KANE 1A V JONES JUSTICE OF THE PEACE OFFICE ix QIIIFFITIIS BLOCK KAXB PA pAHVKU HOUSE MRS C W Kiso Proprietress Ilatw per Day WARREN 1EXSA ARTISTICAL PHOTOGRAPHER WARREN PKNNA THOS L KANE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON Office tn MnRownnH Pnijt Store Eloctrlc Nlght Bell at right side of front door HARRIETA KANE OFFTCB AT HsstwssCB KANE PA Receives tadlcs nnrt Children only for mil modloiil and surgicul treatment EVAN ON KANE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON Office nt MnjmvrnnB Drug Store Burgeon to If US E L WHITINO MILLIXER AND DRESSMAKER UeMrtotlrr and Htnreim Clmso Street A stock of Millinery Goods TjlXCHANOE GBO II LKOKMAHT Proprietor PENKA llntes per Klnc Hum pie lloornn J AKMNTKONO PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON KANK IKNNA over lilllis DrnK Sto lltrCKTAK HOTEL A KKSTAUKAXT K E Iroprhtor Frnlrv Htrert Knnr Warm nnd a ItourtniE Slnlile for nrctmiinoijulloii or those having ftEURtiK AUTKSIAN PotinWo Stenm Drill 1 HEWER llofsK IlitEwm Proprietor PKNXA Vtrlylinlll ami In rvtry nsixvt IHHlmruyuul Itunulo nnd KrlmllnmilN m i ILS U ITTI K SKA 111 M I N Kit V KSSM A K I N 5 A N I J NOTIONS UitKKVtw STKEKT KANE PKNXA stumtlnK riotu slmrl imtliT II WKSTON SI SUUGKOX r R it ANI r A it KANK IENNA onim ovrr MMonl Pharmacy Kntrmiri1 from Noiith of tuiltdltii rnll tiy brll at riglll of office dour tTae inff liiln T NO A NOTARY UKNKUAI IX SlUAXCK AiiKXT AND OlTlCK KANE JfKKAN IWNTV PBXNA Contnvts Predt tjrasrn Mrt nnd ffrnrral fonvryatiHuK ItiiBitirss will firoinpt attention Omrr at Joiix BAVKVS UOIITOX ATTORNEYS AXI O SMETHPORT PA o front on second flooror Ilnckns ImilrttTis Itfmv Ml Irsal s pntinptly to KEYSTONE BILLIARD PARLOR AND HAKIIKK SHOP IltorinrToit k KAXK 1A P O Box CO Thft tAblos and nrc nil now r n trnod shnvcnr A came of or pool Rive hint n cull life rad Afcidnlal lasunnce A gents IIANOS On ATTACIIMKNTR wn 1Airrs SMETHPORT PENNA Will h on or about the 1itli of inoiltlu Tmloy Htrwt KANK PKNNA ThU room xpn newly thmiiKli onl A line new Ililllurd Tnble of Inlost iiiftkn hat been nddpil and lie Pool Tnblr ovcrhnuUd and ctiMlilttnK and added Any one who rolling the can do with pleasure thin Parlor A FIRSTCLAsTlJARBEU SHOP Is run In conmrllon with the Bllllnrd Pnrlor you eiw itct ft Rood slmve or bnlr cut they will nnd konontblecm plnymenttkatwlll not take Them from tbelr homes ana The profltn lire wire for IndnBtrlons pcmon have mndc are nnw making seveml hnndrpd aollnrs n month It Is easy for any one to malw J5 and upwards per day who U willing to work Kilbrr Hex young or old oapfUl needed wo Hurt you Xosperlnl Ahtllty required yon reaoer ejtn fln II well an any one Write to once for fnll pnrtletilani which wemalliree FRANK MAREN BARBER AND HAIRDRESSER HOTSF IWr OottSnn Rlmmpooinn an mmnner A share of the atronage of pnMIc respect fnlly so OQ P H H hi hi l 0 Pk tt e u 0 P CJ H 0 U If CJ PIONEER HARDWARE STORE SMITH WELKER Proprietors With our LouPrices keep the front with the Greatest Stock of HARDWARE Ever Brought to Kane Our stocK of COOK aud Heating Stoves Beggars Description GENERAL HARDWARE Inihitling everything in Tin Copper and Sheet Iron Ware And General Job Work done in a and Workman like Manner at Reasonable Rates Satisfaction Guaranteed Competition Defied T STUTTIIEIW J C WEI 1SS1 A If MKKtVT 1 STRUTHERS IRON WORKS In ihnn are marreM of wlw item CM Awe WMV nvnr 1 i T wRTT flnnfMHi In vlferetvr ttWT nte Yrm STRUTHERS WELLS A Proprietors ENGINE BUILDERS BOILER MAKERS And Mannfiwtnrem of Saw Mitt Oil Well and Tannery Machinery CHAMPION ENGINES AND BOILERS REPAIR WOKK TO ROMTTIT JOB RRJNTTMO WOOD AND WED east wind blattered In licr car daisy shuddering drooped her bead pinched nor heart with fear her eye and sold true would think to barm bit thing like modest me ma dowa and keep me warm ner acts mo whbpertd through ber hair blushing coyly smiled to say How do you daref T thoughts beguiled crown and crimson lips trembled on his crest stained her petal tips o him week The bloom of autumn woodJier heart She daisy gave her heart away Such love as tbclr8 true Joys Impart Their life was golden day Ko thought how long such lova could test Ivan his upon her breast to lie Her matron hopes no shadow cost That love vould ever die John II Harper LABORERS OF JAPAN Great Poverty Among the Lower Classes Booses and Consul Jemigan of Osaka report as follows to tho department of state It may be aaid emphatically that there la great poverty among the lower classes in Japan the inheritance of long centuries of superstition and despotism a population of living on an area of square miles twothirds of which are mountains and blUs unnulted for agricultural purposes labor will con tinue for a long time to bo cheap and abundant A good laborer can be hired for 15 to 25 cents per day and he will work from 8 a m to 9 p m and board himself The laborer dont wear many clothes and often appears In a suit that wonld excite the envy of the stanchest dude A laborers home is mostly one story and contains not note than two or three rooms in addition to a small room each for cooking and bathing purposes The floor of the rooms is about ono foot from the ground and covered with soft thick straw mats which are kept very clean for the Japanese always takeoff their san dals or clogs when entering the house Furniture is not used at all in a real Japanese house except a small table about a foot high and fifteen inches square which is only called into requisi tion nt meal time the family sitting on the mnts like tailors on their benches The bedding consists of soft thick cotton quilts spread on the mats A laborers bouse including everything connected with It will not cost more than In gold In such houses ventilation warmth aeem never to bo considered for the proper partitions nnd slides are only pro tected in cold and stormy weather by strong wooden shutters fitting badly and through which the wind and rain find lit tle difficulty In entering And there are neither stoves nor grates In such houses for tin materials employed In building are so inflammable that It would bo danger ous to use them In tho place of stoves and grates there are braziers filled with bcntcd charcoal and at night the brazier when the weather is cold Is covered with kind of earthenware nnd placed under the quilt the latter being protected from the Arc nnd heat by a wooden grating Though labor is cheap in Japan and Its reward dtecouraaing though the laborer Is unfamiliar with the comforts which surround tho home of worklngman In my own country I believe that the Japanese laborer In tha happiest and best contented being t aaw Tf his pan and cnp arc filled with rice and tea he ap the very embodiment of happiness and all tho Ills of life The agrlcJUlmral Implements as well machinery of almost every description In use by tho Japanese are of the most primitive origin bntattentiou is now be ginning to tic directed to the of modern Inventions though labor Is still eo cheap and abundant In Japan that such Inventions have not yet been received with remuneration In the markets and there is not any sufficient demand to stimulate shipments of machinery and agricultural Implements to this country except to fill special American Late Ideas of Breakfast 7 The old adage No breakfast no is perhaps as true in some form today as when first formulated although of tau years the Ideas of people concerning break fast have undergone a radical change For the laboring man and for the man of much physical exercise a heavy breakfast Is necessary but for the man or woman of sedentary habits a light breakfast ia doubtless much better Tn any ease frnit should always be found at break fast Many prefer it after the meat hut It Is not only more digestible but assists the digestion more surely If used at the beginning of the meal For a light breakfast the fruit should be followed by ono of tho cereals In some form with cream which Is more nourishing than milk and by many as easily digested This followed by delicate dry toast or rolls with coffee tea or chocalate and perhaps eggs in some form makes a breakfast so easily digested that many persons can do far more work on it than en heavier Talk United States In the Future The center of population of the United States according to tho last census Is near Louisville Ky It has steadily moved westward for a century Baltimore having been about the center at the bo ginning of tho century No donUt the next census will show that it has moved considerably further west probably to some point in Illinois At this rate It will not be long before this point will be to the west of the Mississippi river When nil of the territories are admitted there will be twentyone states westof the Mississippi nnd twentysix to the cast so that no matter what may bo the increase in population of the west the east will al ways have a majority in the change Keonrnnlxlng In Drawers Heres a space economizing device To keep several kinds of paper in n drawer ono above the other so that any layer shall be as quickly accessible as the top one 1 put large cardboard sheets between the different kinds or sizes leaving at one side whichever side is handiest a project ing margin an inch longer on each than on tho one nbovc OT the principle of tho lettered edge index Which so expedites our use of the directory This I nso to raise Instantly all that lies ftViovo tho particular paper I am S In The Writer Thn Italian Thrco new vessels of tho Italian Re Umbcrto Sicilia nnd each to be provided with engines to de velop the enormous force of indi cated horse power Previous to 1881 the greatest power pat into one ocean vessel was abont indicated horse power but the Italians now have two of indicated horse power Arkansaw Traveler A LOUISIANA CUSTOM CELEBRATING THE CUTTING OF THE LAST STALK OF CANE Vigoroiu Work at the Lost Envied of All tong rroccwlon of Happy Negro A time honored custom among the hands on a sugar plantation ia the celebration of the day when the last load of cane is from the fields to the sugar house There are few planters who object to this festival nnd there arc not many who assist personally in its observance An account of one of these celebrations will be an almost faithful picture of all for there Is little variety about them It is A clear sunny winter day nnd the hiinOs work vigorously at the last acre of cane Cane knives glitter in and out of the rustling green tons there is a swift gleam of bright along the stalks a quick stroke near the ground and the pilers lift the clean in piles ready for the leaders to toss in great nrmfnls to the men waiting in the carts Cane is heavy and it requires a marvelous sleight of hand and some muscular power towjnd a bundle of cane flying into tho grasp of another person Mingled with crackling tit stalks and the rushing sound of falling cane tops comes the even melody of tho negroes as they chant jubilee songs There is only a little cane left The men hold back making a desperate appearance of haste but not cutting more than they can help Each man tries to deceive his neighbor but the overseer is looking on and the cane must be cut Swish crack last stalk is almost reached and who will have the glory of cutting itr The men are eager and excited the over seer hurries them up one after another the stalks hurrah the envied man cuts the last and waves it triumph antly above his head As the last loud Is piled on a cart cheers loud and long an nounce the beginning of the celebration BANNERS OF ALL SORTS The planter has supplied the negroes with ImnniiB of all The cane ciirts arc decorated with tluso anil tlie three or four mules in every cart have a brielit rosette surmounted by a small United StalcK flag placed ahoxo each long ear ISisitlis these there are from one to three great flags supported In every wagon by a proud darkey Malay or white man ns case nmy lie the Hue is formed it has it very imposing Iwk First the leaders carl in which stands the man with the last sulk heM upright and uiic or two bif flnjp wlilch tho ladies of the planters household are solicited cacti year to manufacture and much envied is the man to whom they are pre sented for they arc as attractive as yards of tricoloreil flannel ribbons and gill de vices can make tliem There also ban ners mailc by the colored vels In the way of nt reamers and gaudy patchwork The long procession lichlnd the last ml of cane surmounted by Its gay decorations and moves toward the sugar mill nmid loud for the plainer ami overseer AH tinmill whistles nrc blowing and the nmcli respected IKUK arc left in the power of the to Iw rung until the arms of tlic rlngors nre worn out Tho prnrawliitt is greeted nt the mignr litiusc with great rrjnkinrf speeches in and tlie women and children stream from the quarters atul clamber into tlie carts There Is a great shrieking of roaring of machinery mulling of cane mingled with tho of none ulid cheering ara drunk In every variity of u tintthe 1ml Amid ail this din minor nre unheard After leaving Hie sugar liouao the troop of dnrkrys files nronnd the mansion of the planter cliecriiijjc the family who ancs peclcd to make their appearance and tie nt Addresses nre nuwlo to the planter who of course lins to return llinnks for if there is anything dear to the Noiil of tlie darkey il is and tho mul brothers of llio planter It lie has any come in for their full of negro oratory TREATIXd T1IE CROWD Money Is given to tlic lenders to treat the crowfl and the planter has to use every excuse in his power to prevent him self lieiiiK hnfstni upon the shoulders of the Joyous negroes This ceremony ticing over nre thrown into the tho lenders return to their wagons nnd rattle around tho proundu two or three times with Imnliag of drum squeaking of fifes cheering and other demonstra tions Then off they go to get their sec ond installment whisky at tie where the plaiitntion storekeepers receive their slutro of attention The procession joes to ns many plantations ns possible mid In the dusk as the fog comes rolling in from the river sweeping across the empty firIds nnd winding in and out of the border of the woods almost a mile one hears the sound of a beautiful negro melody Wo waiting on do Ixrd rising mul falling sweet and clear on the night iir And then the cnrts come lum bering home holding a half intoxicated wholly happy crowd There is a grand supper waiting for them nnd nobody thinks of the depredations committed be forchnml upon other mens goods in the way of nigs and poultry More liquor is drunk more speeches made and the planters entire fence is serenaded by the j untiring crowd a late hour Ikfore the rising Iwll rings the too sweeps in eddying folds while nnd pale golden into the blue oak woods and dis closes the quarters silent for the very dogs nrc sleeping Here and there gray smike curls up above the cabins the bell quavers its summons There is n long waking howl from the dogs and sharp calls of negro women Soon a large part of the previous days proceedings will be enacted with unabated Ruth Knmay in Sew Orleans Times Democrat Tito Knilnrmnee Wo look upon 30 to 40 degs below zero which our northern neighbors oc casionally nee ns a temperature that is about the limit of human endurance with any degree of comfort and probably it Is with even our best methods of combatting nnd so we stand nirhast when we hear of the Eskimo out sledging nnd hunting 50 GO and even 70 dogs below zero forgetting all the lime that these people have a clothing which is proportionately Tnnch warmer than their lowest tempera ture Is colder than ours and this too with equal if not lees weight than ia our I clothing They are therefore better prc I pnreA to endure it than wo can possibly Schwatka Ivory tlM Congo Region De Brazza African explorer upper Congo regton tewn with ivory Be found large of tasks in some of villages and they were often offered to him for small qtrantitks of bands White fce river he SAW in eight itays 103 elephants i Ait Inveterata KmoltAr I An English historian while writing it said smokes cot only one cigar but MvcrtU To manage this he bad to invent a new cigar holder This has the ordinary I month piece but Branches off so to speak i at sight at the other end There I are in OMM Into which cigars are placed aa many as fonr at a time being a Kewa RAILROAD TRAVEL IN RUSSIA Cheap aad United Time and Lonir Railroad travel In Russia reminds ono pf that in certain sections of the United States where the roads ore very new the equipments cheap the employes inexperi enced and all kinds of accomodations very limited It was only since the late rebellion in America that Russia has figured at all in railroad circles The Hues built by Wimans of Baltimore were well built but they were not well equipped and have been poorly maintained The arbitrary direction of the czar that all the lines should be perfectly straight from one large city to the other or from the beginning to the termini regardless of tho lesser points on the way will be a great drawback to the country for many years The strangers attention Is directly attracted to the large number of small cities and important villages he sees from one to flvo miles off the railroad lines These marts of trade ore more or less sub stantial and generations Will come and go before the stations are as plentiful along the railroad lines as they would at first have been mode hat for the inter ferenco of the czar It is very seldom that a house is pro vided for locomotives or there is a shed for any class of material or equipment notwithstanding the fact that the nine months of rain or snow in each year make them more necessary than in other coun tries Locomotives resting and falling to pieces although but a few years old and tools of every character are seen strewn about everywhere Tho stations however are commodious and comfort able The fastest express trains which make about twenty miles an hour stop M every station from flvo to forty mm utes The guard comes to your carriage door when the train stops opens It nml tells how long the stop will be He also points to the restaurant hard by and tells yon what can be purchased and further that there Is ample time it Is probable that there Is n commission arrangement or all the railroad restaurants are run by the company Few passenger trains that have not some freight cars The trains are long the rails heavy and good the ballasting fair but the equipments are so inferior that the employes refuse to make any speed But one passenger train a day even on the principal lines and very seldom is a sleeping car or a carriage that can be utilized as a sleeper encountered For a run between two cities distant like New York and Washington or New York and Uoston which occupy five aud a half or six hours In America a day or night of twclva to fourteen hours is consumed There are seldom closets or drinking water or similar accommodations At every station day or night old women or children visit the carriages sad cell drink ing water There Is one comfort however on a Russian railway train There are no cinders The old fashion wood burning locomotives are used and as they have spark and cinder protectors and burn pine or whlto poplar or there la freedom front both ctndcnt or smoke Tho roads are too new for dust too when there la a period dry enough to mako dost Moscow Cor Cleveland Leader Form of Kraralala A very singular form of neuralgia Is that affecting the of ampntated limbs tt not rarely happens that aftct an ampntated stump has healed the nerves of the stump being compressed In the scar become exceedingly painful Curi ously the pain is not felt in the stump but la the extremity of tho limb which has been amputated In ono coming under the notice of the writer a man whose arm hod been amputated above the elbow re ferred the exquisite pain he felt to the little finger of the ampntated hand years after the operation An old one legged soldier applying for au Increase of pen sion said Ho had more pain In the foot which aint than tn the foot which This was a terao way of saying that bo continued to have a pain In the foot which he had lost on the battlo field many years before The explanation of this consists In the fact that the terminal of a nerve are mrct sensitive parts they arc tha the points from which the sen sations start on tlreir course to the brain Where they give notice that something U wrong with the outlying When the nerve is Injured in iu continuity the Is often referred to the terminal ends Every one who has struck his crazy point above the elbow where the nlnar nerve is very superficial and easily have noticed how much tho sensation was affected In the little finger the pain being often greater there than at the point whero the blow was H Robe M In CourierJournal IJke u Shock Tlic explosion of a water reservoir or boiler in the kitchen of the Klrby house Milwaukee recently was perfectly re corded in the vibrations given by the shock to a ruling machine in the bindery of Tho Sentinel The machine Is directly opposite ono of tho windows of the bind ery and was in full motion when the ex plosion took place drawing straight lines The first Impulse of the shock carried the pen nearly half an inch from the true line then for some distance it approached the trne lino again wavering when It suddenly drew wavering lines for the final reactionary vibrations The lines are just such as are mode by tho seis mometer in an earthquake Orleans Picayune TTontklp of Log There Is a log of yellow color standing Just outside of Chl Una Gate of Peking where it has been since the fall of tho Ming dynasty commanding tho respect of all classes of people It is in perfect condition The insects have not made any raids upon it as they do on other logs The people believe that tho log must be the residence of eome god so they annually worship it On the 1st of October the emperor commanded tho board of ceremonies to appoint a few of ficials to pay respects to tjio deified Chicago Herald Be Liked how did you like my ser mon V New ports of it I liked very For Well Vhcre you started off with blessed are the pnra in heart and a lot of other Oh that was my Hm I think on the whole I like the port yon call your better than what yon eall yonr sermon Why dont yon make your texts Tran script Perfumers now nifllte the scent of the encumber KNOTTS FUNNY SPEECH THE KENTUCKY CONGRESSMAN TELU8 THE STORY OF HIS INSPIRATION A Serious Oration Prepared but Lobbyists Wonderful i of Bnluth to Brilliant DlittUy of Congreialonal Hnmar The red herdlc which mns from tha Capitol to the White House wns full the other day and a stocky portly abort USD I hung oa by the sirup He wns cold aud his round heml was well wrapped in i green woolen comforter and his plug lint j waa pulled well down over bis brow face only shoue but it looked like piece of rare china The color was as rosy ns the most florid of Rubens paintings and the eyes shone out through white winkers as blue as a midsummer rity A short moustache of silver was the only sign of and the face was AS round nnd as tell as that of the moon He smiled as I asked him whether the day was as cold as those of Duluth Itwas Procter Knott of Kentucky whose funny speech on Lm loth some fifteen years ago mode him famous and who Is now visiting Wash ington and hobnobblOK with his old con gressional friends I am told his speech still sells and 1 saw some of these Duluth speeches recently at a second hand hook store and was told they were worth a quarter apiece Proctor Knott hud no idea at tho time that this speech was going to make his reputation and it was an inspiration which only once in a life time Ha told me the story He said It was near the close of the session nnd I was asked to speak on the land subsidy bill In tha house I prepared a sober oration with no more Inn in its points than In the moral law and It was nearly as long t tried to get the speakers eye and when the billwas about pausing Holmau was preferred before me I asked him to give me his right to the floor or a part of his time He told me he could not do it At last I spoke to the speaker and he said lie thought he could arrange to give me hearing KO IDEA OF ITClfOR This was several days before tho speech was made and I had no Idea of humor as yet A day or so later a lobby ist called upon me and told me that a bill wonld soon come up to improve the hnr bor of Dtilnth I asked him to tell me where Dulnth was I know of course its situation but I wanted him to under stand that 1 thought but little of his bill and be thus able to refuse his rvqurst Ho did not see my Irony but ho put hand in his breast pocket and polled ont a map Here was the whole clvitlited world drawn la circles aud these circles grew smaller and smaller until at lost they terminated in a dot at tlie center and on that dot was printed the word These were hundred mile circles and the distances of all the great cities of the coun try were noticed and their small dots looked like hamlets compared with Ihiluth To look at that map you wonld suppose t hat if yon wanted to go to Liverpool London or Constantinople youd have first to go to bulnth for yimr Mart and on the map were printed showing that there were square miles about that point all tributary to Duluth The bland yonng man delivered his eulogy of this mighty embryonic city and I saw ns he did eo the chance for some fun In tho house I asked him toleave the map and mid that 1 lived on a little creek In Kentucky nod that most of my people had never seen a ship He did this and he suspected nothing saying Mr Knott I hope yon Will study that map mid po for our I replied will go but 1 ticvvrsat him again As I thought more over the i matter the fan grew upon me and I found I that 1 could make my speech on the bind bill and bring In Duluth t went to tho library and prepared some of the best parts of the humor and I Intended it onlr as au Introduction to my more rubcr speech When I got the floor I found the house with me and when my time was extended I conld not go np from tha ridiculous to the sublime I went on with tlie linrnor and dropped the serious oration and the speech over which I had spent days of labor was never delivered The prrntor part of tlic humorous was tho result of the of moment and while I made It I never thought that It would put tttc country upon a brood grin I wns astonishid the next day to flnd every ono talking ubont it and that all my friends nt the Capitol congratulated me upon O Carpenter in New York World A REMARKABLE TEAM 4 Ormm of Biz Army Tbntr Ktpnrlenef Cfcll War From nn account given by MrHarvey Riley formerly in charge el the quarter musters depot at Washington we are enabled to give a sketch of one remark able team Early in the spring of a certain group of six met officially com rades They hod been associated occa sionally before in the somewhat mixed society of the quartermasters corral but now they were regularly mustered Into the service of the United States by afterward Sawtclle and were hitched up together for the first time at Berry villc and one Ed ward Wesley Williams a colored teamster united fortunes wlU theirs He was a good teamster and at once established those amicable and confidential wWb his animals which are of the highest sequence to the successful negro driver His trace chains were never so short that the singletrees banged about the wheelers1 heels His hits were always of the regu lation size seveneighths inches round and full five inches between tho rings His broad harness straps were properly adjusted so that there should bo no reasonable ground for the laying back of ears or the letting fly of heels Tho authorities deemed it Important that Williams and hb mules should be in Washington on the oay of Lincolns In auguration and they started for the na tional capital on March 1 but history to record the exact date of their arrival Inasmuch as the ceremonies passed off successfully and without Interference from tho confederates we may infer that the whole six added the music of their voices to the cheers that went up from In front of the Capitol on that memorable oceaston They remained on duty in and about the defenses of Washington until May 14 1863 when they were transferred to Fortress Monroe and reported to Gen McClellon or his lawfctl They marched up the Peninsula partlcf pated In the siege of Yorktown the battle of Willlamsbttrg and the ardoons mnd marches of the Chickahomlny At the seven days fight all six were present for dnty and with Indiscriminate efficiency hauled army supplies or ghastly loads of dead and wounded until they reached Harrisons Landing with the Army of tho Potomac Thence Williams drove back to Fort Monroe nnd was shipped to Washington with his team In time to haul ammunition out to Manafisaa Junction ami take part In what an Irish soldier lad called our annual brtTTng aCBulI They saw the tables turned at AMIetam and turned backagain at Frederickstmrg where they were in the ammunition train Under Oen Hooker the team followed the fortunes of war through the Chaoccl lorsvlllo and Chantilly campaigns and was with Grant in front of Petersburg But there sad to relate tho faithful saddle mule on whose back Williams ridden so many weary miles was killed by artillery Ore from the enemys Her surviving comrntles bore np under this affliction and admitted a new Incum bent with their usual grace Tho Intro duction of n stranger was not permlted to interfere with regular duties and the team worked right along until the fall of Richmond In June following hostilities bait ceased and the team was ordered back to Washington where It waa transferred back to the regular army and was oa dnty therewith In Angnst There Is no evidence forthcoming to show that the faithful Williams is not stilt cracking his black snake over the of his hlstorle team at some remote frontier post bnt In the nature of things the four footed members of the association most long since have been honorably re tired or perhaps shot for such Is the merclfnl method of dealing with the super annuated government mulo None of these animals waa more than fourteen and a half hands high nor weighed more than MO pounds They frequently went without bay or groin for fonr or flre days subsisting oa wayside and several times they were without water for twentyfonr Adrian Bextord in American Magasine tho DMillit tVuntii Then the next thing will bo the dis covery of a perfect ansathctic something that will be absolutely safe without unpleasant after People are experimenting ami studying for it now U wilt lie found before long Then yon will think no more about having yonr teeth filled than yon do now about hav ing your hair cut Yon will drop into dentists office nnd have a nerve cxtmcwd and a tooth filled while you mkc a com fortable dose In an easy chair Mirny dentists thought cocaine was Uic long wanted drug when it first appeared but it doesnt work well in practice It will not penetrate dentine and so It ia of no use in filling sensitive teeth ilionch It Ia all right for local use in ulcers Chloroform and ether are loo and few dentists will use them if they can help It York Commercial User Cokri Mahone Is fond of buckwheat cakes but always sends back the first pinto Once when the waiter brought him some j most savory cakes browned to a turn ha tamed up his nose at them ami snid What kind of leather is tlint I ordered cakes snd I want them of buck wheat Go back M the cook and tell him that I want a fresh plate of cakes and they must be clone brown The waiter then carried the cakes ont of the room And picking np n cold plate he slid them off on to it then put them on the stove to keep warm A few minutes later he brought this plate into Mahone and Maliouc looked nt it critically and then gave the waiter n dol lar saying My boy this looks like imsi ness and these cakes are flt for n kiiic G Carpenter in Xcw Yvrk World Cotchtoa PaMta I havto an acquaintance who earns a handsome living with money to span by Inventing new devices of all kinds likely to catch the capricious public fancy He Invented toys bats advertiaenmtta Inks pens pencils and I know not what else and is now concentrating ate energies upon a novelty In stationery The de mand for new styles and shapes In fancy stationery Is constant Any oddity how ever eccentric In color site er form that iunuy be Is certain to go What he pro poses isto presantably put upon the market block paper and envelopes to ho written on with a Ink Ha per fected his device he avers and expects to reap a handsome fortune by tt For per sons In very deep mourning especially those who have lost wealthy relatives who have remembered them In their wills it should certainly possess nansaal attractions As we have had every other color in stationery hut black nothing I suppose remain after U but tor to invent some substitute for paper to write Trnmhle in New York In rmnefc IBOBM The discovery of paralysis as the orig inal cause of so many forms of mental alienation is the most Important evejait of the century hi psychiatric and it may be called the chief ttkturo of the new school Since this discovery the insane are no longer considered beyond the domain of science and the belief stTtagthons dally in a correlaation between mental and physical disturbances Paerperal cardiac and hepatic insanity have been MeegnlisA in their turn and the modern movement tends to the that there is not a point of the human economy which If wounded cannot a psychlo trouble especially In those subjects pet pared by an hereditary talat picturesque expression of Dr Falret the celebrated alienist the physician eoasenlai no longer to be the secretary of Ma patients to write droll stories nnder tnelr dictation Instead he searches the phys ical structure to find where an Cor Now York Post In Partially successful experiments naling by means of electric lights flashed on clouds have been made by ofilj cers at Singapore A message of I words was read from an vessel at a distance of sixty knots lint iho r escaped notice Arkansas Traveler The British ptwtnfrlca nervier women Competitors for have to be over 18 and under 20 yenrs ait nee The Old Ttaw Hassav Judge Samuel Lnmpkln lately sent to the writer a half dozen from his private smokehouse of the vintage ofLlm that are simply in ashes Any self re specting pig would have died gladly to have been eo idealised In these yon catch flavor of the smoke of halt smothered oak chips above Tthkh they drifted with the seasons into perfec tion And red gravy excuse drooling clear consistent flavorous is aneh gtwry ae yon nstd to ftnd on yonr Mothers table when yon eame from a long days hunt ia the December wind I tad rather have a smoke emotions but are ft ilfll hwlf Oat of XmtlM of Babn Uttie mamma Are Ucitf Mamma wno might be 35 ont 3T0 dear Only Mred Mamma hae beta shopping afl My I know what they can Lam poon 8t are von doing np heraf to how I can j go Cant I higher than thh Noy j yon cant Who arc yon anyhewf am Ike Price of Journal with loamy floor Its darkened rafters its red pepper pods Its of odowMM of aaeje arfn 140 sneli na between earth and roof live If than a cellar of dost of Madeira Out art ot IMMHk ife tflt uVMfPMk VMMWt nWMMfc became hat Snail gravy go TyrtM ptrrpfci into tftennlM of tto for a pwmy are trwy to oot oC A HWWnttigMMiy CMrfty ewwrrttptfryrt of Hi ewifr ffPMYy tofteMR c tfca I WaTO AtttV HO OMKVMiMt Of Iti i Mfr fe HHV w   

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