Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Indiana Weekly Messenger Newspaper Archive: April 18, 1883 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Indiana Weekly Messenger

Location: Indiana, Pennsylvania

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Indiana Weekly Messenger (Newspaper) - April 18, 1883, Indiana, Pennsylvania                                VOL 27 NO 35 WAN FED IMMEDIATELY 1 A few good men to canvass for the sale of Fruit and Ornamental Trees Shrubs vines Hoses ic No experience required Oooa Salary and all expenses paid Address J BO WDEN i 13313ms Rochester QAUTION hereas my nd board cation this is to warn Sl persons f r or trust her on my account as l i INDIANA WEDNESDAY EVENING APRIL 18 1883 WHOLE NUMBER 1335 Whereas my wife Christina lias left my bed and board wituout any Just cause or p h rovocati arbo JXECUTORSNOTICE Whereas letters testamentary on the es tate of John Pcarce lateof Youni decd have been granted to the persons indebted are required to iniike imme diate payment and those bavins clKuns or tlemandsacainstthe entate of said dMCdent will make known the same March Executor J7XECDTORSNOTICE Wheicas letters testamentary on the es inn claims or demands against the estate sard decedent will make known the sa without delay SAML EL W HI Apl 17 1S83 Executor ADMINISTRATORS NOTICE Whereas letters of Administration have been granted the undersigned on the of It o Oilhou late of West Indiana 1 oro deceased notice is hereby give to all persons indebted to said estate to make immediate payment and to those claims against the same to present them duly authenticated for settlement H April Administrators j DMINLSTRATORS NOTICE Whereas letters of Administration liave have granted the undersigned on lie estate of Thompson Ewing late of Lone maugh township deceased is hereby given to all persons indebted to id estate make immediate payment and to those having claims against the same to sent them duly April 11 1883 Administrator ADMINISTRATORS NOTICE letters of administration with will an nexedlon the estate or Mrs K Anna Lemon d cceased late of Covode Indiana comity Ia have been granted to the undersigned al persons knowng themselve indebted to said estate will make immediate payment and th ose having claims will present the same du 1 y authenticated for March Administrator Bank Building Indiana Ia A DMINISTRATORS NOTICE rk Wlereas letters of Administration Have been granted the undersigned on the estate of Samuel Shearer late of White township de ceased notice is hereby given ta all persons indebted to said estate to make immediate payment and to those having claims against the same to present them duly authenticated for settlement BOBERT March 1883 t me The partnership heretofore existing be ween P N Baker and J H liaker doing a ercantile business at Dixonville Indiana county under the firm name of P liaker Bro was dissolved by mutual consent on eb ruary 12 1883 J H Baker retiring from the The business will be continued by P N Baker who will settle all accounts of the late firm All persons knowing themselves in debted to the late flrm are requested to make immediate settlement P N BAKtR J H BAKER S H DRENNING Dentist Homer City Fa Will be at home every Monday and Satur day at Heshbon 1st and 3d Tuesday s 4th Tuesdays Green ville Island ad Fridays StronKstown 2nd and 4tli Wednesdays Jacksonville ind and 4th Thursdays to each month to do dental work LANDS FORTHEJANDLESS IV NEBRASKA owned by the Burling ton and Missouri R R company These lands are rich and sure For sale on long time with low rates of interest For pamphets in theEnglishfGerman and Swedish languages maps price of tickets AC Apply in person orbyletug Dlst Agt B M Land Dept Indiana Pa mm Sprin Term of 1j Weeks opens APRIL 9TH Tuition Common School Branches incuding Book Keeping and Vocal Music Mathematics and Sciences including Higher Arithmetic IJrawing and Short Hand Latin and Greeks Classics or Organ and 1ianujltessous Hoarding and room rents at very low rates A W McCULLOUUH Principal lYnu llun Indiana county Pa 13313t W J MITCHELL Cathifr S PORTER 1 R Cashier Xo 3131 CAPITAL Surplus rmsT of DIRECTORS JOHN PROTHERO A W KIMMELL THOMAS SOTTON J G LE WIS DAS S PORTER COMIIIHSDUIUROOM IN THE DIAMOND B flmSVILXE forthe pain less extraction of teeth Jan 18 CASH PAID FOR HIDES MD BiRK AT THB Tannery in East End EDWARD BOW Ttuil24f THE MOST EXTENSIVE PUKEBRED LIVE STOCK ESTABLISHMENT IN THE WORLD Sa Fo CLYDESDALES PERCHERONXOUMANS EVGLISH DRAFT HORSES TKOTTIXGBREDTROADSTERS AND DEVON CATTLE Our customers have the advantage of our many years experience in breeding and im porting large collections opportunity of comparing different breeds low prices be cause of extent of business and low rates of transportation Catalogues free Correspon dence solicited POWELL BROTHERS Jaul93m Springboro Crawford Ta DRUGS J S Nesbit OLD STAND OPPOSITE THE DEALER IN Drugs Stationery ALL STOCK FRESH Physicians Perscrlptions compounded none but Esoer eaced FsrsonS Jan vr 1883 1883 HUBBLE IKD UNITE WOBKS All kinds of Foreign and American mar bie Monuments and Headstones always on hand and manufactured toorder Marble and Marbleized Slate Mantles of the latest designs finished in all known colors with gold tracings or any ornamental finished desired which we will furnish and put up to order ROOFING SLATE and floor tile furnished to order We have so cured the agency for the well known and pop ular RYEGATE GRANITE which is not surpassed by any granite in the country It possesses many points of excel lence It is of fine even texture free from imperfections of aoy sort1 We have all the latest designs formcnumental work and other cemetery work All orders will be promptly filled Satisfaction in workmanship and price guaranteed in all cases SAMUEL GROVE 1330tf Indiana Pa Pittsbur Institute 110 St Pittsburgh Second Floor Opposite the Post Established for the manufacture and saleof SPECTACLES OF ALL KINDS and qualities GOOD AND with their accurate adjustment to vision For ex aminations of the Eye and best treatment of its ocular diseases art or science can accom plish in Strengthening or Restor ing Sight Conducted by ProfFranks M Principal late Optician by Diploma to the New York OpJitbalmic Hospital for Diseases of the Sitentee of improvements in Spectacles Eye lasses and Lenses Oculist Optician Leiture er on the human eye use and abuse of spec tacles w by pay the extravagant prices us ually charged fur spectacles or examinations of the Eye or risk injury to vision by pur chasing that dangerous article a pair of from mere dealers who are gener ally unacquainted with the science of optics or anatomy of tbe eyeDr Franks has the honor to refer to the following gentlemen of this county T St Clair M Indiana Pa T M Taylor M Indiana Pa Rev Bhadmeh D D Indiana Fa M T Indiana Pa A F Indiana Pa S A Smith Mayor of Indiana Pa J G Cunningham M D Kittanning Pa W W Smith M Kittanning Pa Ilev M Schweigert Kittanning Pa Rev J H A Kitzmiller Kittanning Pa D Stewvrt T Kittanninp Pa Hon E McJunkin Butler Pa Hon C Mci andless Butler Pa B Bradin Hon A G Curtin ExGov of Penna Late Hon T W of Penna Late Hen Milliard Fillmore Pres U S R A YOUNGS be found the largest andriohest stock ot Holiday Goods by all odds that ever came to this market There you will find some BEAUTIFUL DIAMONDS IN 18 L GOLD There you will find Gold Gents and Ladies Watches Chains Necklaces Jewelry Spec tacles Eye Glasses Gold Headed Canes THERE you will find Roll Plate Jewel ry of every article Spectacles and Beading Glasses Clock and regulators for every pur There you will find an whole cases of American Foreign Watches DRY GOOD Stores which will be every house In the trade proBt or no pron Every Mticle warranteed Just as represented or no Bale Yon can find bun in tbe old place fonnd dOM She Would Be r Journalist She came tripping into the city edi tors room and throwing a little satchel on his desk opened up after this fashion Im a journalist I write for all the principal story papers besides a number of magazines and one or twx daily You must have your hands said the editor O no I find plenty of time to do everything I just slap off a lore story say in the morning jump in and do up a poem or two after luncheon and get in some correspondence after supper O 1 knoiv what women can do and Im theory that we can accom plish just as much if not more than the men if we are only given a fair show Now I came in to see you about Christ said the lady taking a chair and pulling up to the editors side Anything particularly odd about the holiday this year asked the editor No but you bring out a paper every Sunday said the lady We Now what you want on the Sunday before Christmas is a Christmas num said the Do you catch on to the idea Something full of every thing about Christmas A regular holi day issue of the paper See said the I da not see how you can be interested Ah thats the said the lady You see I know just what a Christmas number should be I know how to gel it up Now I propose to bring out youi Christmas number for and she smiled sweetly upon the somewhat as tonished editor But my dear Miss Well then my dear Hiss Anne Scott Hasel tine Of course you are familiar with my name I always sign it in full to all my said the lady taking a large masculinelooking card from her pocketbook and passing it over to the editor say that Ive saw it in said the editor But of course you know I read very few stories of that sort Just the pointl wish to said the lady grabbing hersatchel and taking a roll of manuscript out of it of course you newspaper men cannot find time to read much less write stories Now in getting out your Christmas number you want somebody to help you who is up in the story line of business I am that person I will get you out a Christmas number that will just make all the ed itors of tlte country fairly black with Ver3r said the editor but we already have an editorfor the Sunday paper Am quite sure you would do all you say but I know you have an editor for the said the lady but this is a special occasion Now Ill just jump in at once and look over the ground Lets Here is a good long story for the first page A regular Dickens Christ mas snap That will do I and the ladyplumpsd a great roll of manu script down upon tlie desk in front of her Then here is a But my dear ma lam I mean Miss Hazelbushr Haseltine if you please Well said the ed itor we adopt your sug gestion But suppoaryou hear the opening chapter of my story You will excuse Then you might listen to a single verse of my Morning to the A perfect gemin its way It opens The snow is sifting through the air And fiillins very fast And snowbirds hopping here and there Sing Christmai scim2 at My dear I am very busy this cried the editor If you will call in I whatthat said the lady you want me to leave You men never have the least patience with a woman You always put her down as not knowing anything at the start and consider her society a bore unless she is foolish enough to let you make love tohcr Itt if you will only listen to another verse The nr is full of frost and ice Jacc is on th3 window An 1 litrl i inijnnv think its nico To sen 1 piiiniss to the Hindoo Rut at this point the editor madea will dasli for liberty and hid away in the pressroom for two hours to make sure of not meeting the wouldbe editor Eagle Tae Ostrich Kici When a farmer goes into a savage birds camp he takes with him a thorn pole with a branch or two of the thorny bush left on the end This is called a and when the tuck is applied to the ostrichs neck or head his tender points he is almost invariably subdued and after one or two efforts to escape bolts furiously off to the other side of the camp where he races up and down to vent his baffled rage If however the birdvrets near enough to his opponent to give the socalled kick he lifts his bony leg as high as his body and throws it forward with demoniac grotesqueness and brings it down with terrible force His object is to rip the enemy down with his dangerous claw but in most cases it is the flat bottom of his foot which strikes and the kick is dangerous as much from its sheer power as from its lacerating effects It is a movement of terrible velocity and power at all events Several instances may be mentioned of herd bovs being thus either wounded or killed outright One case occured near Graaff Reinet in which a horse had his back broken by a single blow In this case the bird had en deavored to kill the rider but missed him and struck the horse Many persons have been set upon by birds when there was no shelter not even a tree to run to In such a case if the pursued were acquainted with struthious tactics he would lie down flat on the ground where the bird finds it impossible to strike him But even tnw is no lioht matter for some birds in their rage baffled of their kick will roll over their prostrate enemy bellow ing with fury and trampling upon him in the most contemptuous fashion One man who thus attempted the lyingdown plan found that every time he attempted to rise the bird would return and stand sentry over him till at last after creep ing a distance he got out only by swim ming a pond thatbounded one side of the Century are very unpleasant rumors going the round in taris concerning the deatS of thft late Mme Roland Bona parte which was so mysterious as to have uaused various conjectures about it The latest is that a gentleman known to have experience in chemistry miia to 1o with the death than U THE 1RAOEDT OF 1IIE CLIFF We were camped on a spur of the Eocky Mountains near the brink of an awful pre cipice Sitting in a row on a fallen pide were Charley An drews who was a Yankee tall and young myself and a dark faced stran ger On a flat rock ou the opposite side of the campfire but in such a po sition that the smoke did not obscure his view of the company sat Abraham Le vis a stout old trapper We had come together accidentally I started out from Virginia City alone on a prospecting tour On the after noon in question I encountered Lewis and Andrews pards of long stand ing who invited nie to camp out with them While we were making a fire the stranger appeared and being ask ed to stay by the trapper immediately dropped his prospectors kit and began to help about the fire He was supple jointed black whiskered man of un certain age whom any one who had traveled in the West would take to be a gambler and cutthroaf of the worst type We had now eaten our supper of bears meat and salmon and were dis cussing gold but Abe Lewis who smoked his big pipe in the silence of deep thought His young pard had whispered that a yarn would soon be forthcoming and I for one was ready and wiliing to drop all other topics whenever he deigned to begin It was an autumn evening just growing dusky and cool enough to bring out the comfort of a camp fire Suddenly the trapper looked up took out his pipe blew forth a big cloud oi smoke and said as if his hearers were acquainted more or less with the facts of the case Atwood war as square a young chap as ever lived and that makes it a good deal wuss The that murdered him is the meanest The trapper paused and I fancied his keen blue eyes were fixed on me alone but he soon withdrew his gaze to the gambler who returned it with 8 cool indifference Tell the I said impatient ly Oh Ill go with it full fast enough fur he replied a little he eyed me again Im goin to state all the facts first cause thars some here what dont know about This might imply that I knew some thing about it but I did not With a strange light in his eyes an expres sion I could not understand the old hunter kept all the while looking at me or the stranger or at both as he went on George came to Beaver Ridge dead broke and I took him under my wing I helped him stake out a claim adjoining mine It turned out to be the best one in the place George worked in the gulch alongside o me all summer and some days he made a high as twenty dollars In the forepart of September my claim got played out and I pushed on to Montana Soon after I left a gang of sharps lit down on the Ilidoe and began to beat the boys out of their gold Thar war five in the gang and they brought kecrds and dice and ev ery other blamed contrivance One on em started a bank another a sa loon and the rest roped in the victims They soon owned half the dust in Beaver Kidge But that didnt satis fy em They wanted to clean out ev ery man in town especially them as hung back and influenced otheis to keep out of their place George Atwood didnt take no stock in em and was ut afriad to say so They heard how George had struck it rich and went for him with their palarver One of the gang who called himself Jim Cortland keptfol lerin George up every night and try in to git him to gamble with em But he couldnt make it work George was too smart for him at that game and so he tried another One morn ing George was found outside the camp with his throat cut from ear to ear His two thousand dollars in gold was gone outof his shanty They count ed noses and found Jim Cortland had lit out the night before George had a good many friends and in a short time a big crowd start ed after Jim His former pards jined in with the rest and swore theyd shoot him on sight for disgracin em The boys tracked him pretty close for two days and jest got sight on him Jwhen a big band of redskins rushed onto em out of a patch of woodland on the right They got drove hack to the Ridge a little fastein they left it and Jim Cortland The old hunter paused but still kept his fierce eyes bent on me and on the gambler The firelight shone in his face and he looked as if he want ed to tear the murderer limb from limb WeJijpremained sitting on the log IiiTtnTmiddle the black whiskered man on my right the tall Yankee on my left when the latter rose up and approached the fire Git back thar Charley said Lewis When I talk I want to face the whole The two pards exchanged glances The young man returned to the log but instead of going to his former place he sat down at the gamblers right hand A few months after the continued the trapper I went back to Beaver Kidge to git a bag of gold that Id left thar and I all about it The boys described Jim Cortland to me and Ive been huntin for that man ever There was a short silence during which the trapper never once removed his eyes from his three companions And you mean to wipe out that maa said the gambler coolly Youll find out I do stranger How do you know it was Jim that murdered the young man Theres no proof Many an innocent man has been hung on strong circumstantial ev said the gambler many a guilty man has been rejoined Lewis doggedly Im going to shoot the man that walked over George Atwood ani pitch his body down over this bluff What could the old trapper mean Was the murderer even then lurking in the vicinity or was the dark stran ger Jim Cortland If this were the case the action of the trappers young pard in seating himself at the gamblers right hand might be part of a preconcerted plan to wipe out the murderer Not being a fighting man myself I naturally began to look about for some place of refuge None offered unless I went down the steep descent of the looserocks near at hand and that looked like a dangerous feat But the gambler did not appear to understand the significant words and dark looks of Abe Lewis any better than I did Where is this Jim Cortland he inquired You see that strip of pine said Lewis with one hand pointing across the canon rumbling at the foot of the precipice two thousand feet below to where the shadows were darkening over a long stretch of pines Well Jim Cortland came up the river this afternoon on the outside of them woods I come up on the inside Here I met the steady gaze of the trapper and I was struck by a sudden fear I had come up the river along the edge of the pine forest Could he suspect me of being the murderer But on a second thought I felt easi er The other stranger might have come up where I did and I could easi ly prove an alibi at the time of the murder by my friends back in Virginia City All this passed rapidly in my mind while the gambler was saying Are you sure that youve spotted the right man You never saw him All youve got to go by is the descrip tion given by the Beaver Ridge I know the man Im assert ed Lewis Hes about your closely watching the gambler who never changed a muscle as he gazed into the fire Under the circumstan ces I can describe him pretty close Hes got black hair black beard and square shoulders His face is a little tawney and his nose peaked Hes a tough lookin cuss but he wont kill another man unless he gits over me Im en his trail and one or tother of us ill have to kick the I answered to this loose description and BD did the gambler but there was no olher point of resemblance be tween us If you are so certaiiras to the said the stranger with a cool glance at Lewis lets all go for him How far ahead is he now do you think Come old man give us a hand in the game Ill do that stranger But the mur derer aint ahead of this much he aint Oh then youve passed are on the lay for him said the gam bler looking uneasily dowji the rug ged darkening slope which he had as cended He aini behind said Lewis What Then it must be this ga loot And the gambler seized my shoul der with one hand while the other one rested on his revolver and his eyes were fixed not on me but on Lewis Before I could make a move the old trapper cleared me of the charge No sir vociferated Lewis same instant drawing his revolver Jim Courtland whipped out his weapon and both men fired The gamblers revolver flashed first bat the ball sped harmlessly over the head of the trapper Young Andrews had knocked up the villains arm at the right moment The shot fired by Lewis took effect in the murderers brain and he fell backward over the log dead The trapper immediately approach ed the body of his victim and lifting it up as if it were a mere childs he bore it to the brink of the precipice and hurled it down over the loose rocks Several big stones accompanied it in its downward course and it was soon swallowed up in the gloom that was deepening over the canon I couldnt burry him to a better advantage among the rocks If he comes to life he cant climb out of that said Abe Lswis coolly re suming his pipe before the fire THE LESSOSf OF THE TIOS RRSCTRKEC The picture of the Crucifixion which is perhaps the most noble in concep tion is that in which the painter has not attempted to portray the awfu scene on Calvary itself but has shown its reflection in the faces of the spec tators We see an upper chamber a window open a few poor Hebrew men and women peering through into the unnatuial night beyond Ii is no ordinary human grief and hor ror that is depicted on their faces We know that they look upon the darkened heaven the quaking earth It is a crisis in the history of They see their God in whom they trusted dying the death of a felon No hope was ever like unto their hope no sorrow like theii sorrow It seems to us now as if all the great truths in Christs history were known to us only in the same way by their reflection in the lives of the men and women who filled the world Jesus left no tangible enduring sign of His presence in Judea The chil dren born in Bethlehem are no fairer or wiser than others because of the Star that once shone there the grass is no greener where His footsteps trod there is no rift of brightness to show where the heavens opened to receive Him Every petty prince or brutal soldier in history tried to leave a mon ument or temple to remind the world of him when he was dead but there is not a stone or a mark existing in his native country as a remembrance that Jesus lived Yet the work of this Man and the proofs of Him have filled the world since the baginning Wher ever in any nation or in any time in Pompeii as in New York a man is tempted to give up to his selfishness or his appetites or lo more brutal vices and struggles to resist them ho proves the need of a being who is at once a man like himself to Understand his desperate strait and a God power to help him Wherever since the be ginning of the world there has been pain or trouble or death the cry of the soul has gone up for a helper a redeemer some one who could solve this riddle of life which is too hard for all of us who could open the door after death into some larger world that would atone for the cruel ties the wasted good an1 forces the injustice of this The highest souls have caught a glimpse of such a Sav ior In the first ages of the world Job forsaken by God his body a fes ter sore houseless friendless his chil dren dead cries out in rapture I know that my Redeemer liveth and that He shall stand in the latter day upon the earth and though worms destroy this body yet in my flesh shall see God In every nation there was the expectation of His coming It is in the history of every human soul that we read the necessity of the birth of Jesus of His crucifixion and above all His resurrection There is not a noble aspiration of any man which His teaching does not lead to higher heights there is not a tcnita tion of the devils which beset us every day which it will The meaning f that death on Calvary is shown in the slow but sure elevation by it of the world of the days of Caesar into the world of today If we have exchanged the human sac rifiees of the arena for hospitals the burning of masses of innocent babies before Moloch for Orphan assylums the licentious orgies of Greek and Roman woman worshipping Ceres icr the flowercrowned rejoicing churches of today if the brutal lust of whole sale murders which made up not only the recreation but the religious rites of the most enlightened nation of the ase in which Jesus lived are known not only in the wilds of the whole world is manfully struggling on toward gentleness honesty chairi ty and brotherly is to that one death on Calvary we owe it If there be any hope or courage in the world too it is to this resurrec tion that we owe it Who would work who would sacrifice his life to help meaner men who could bear the intolerable disappointments the pover ty the miseries of this life if death ended all Let us eat drink and be merry if tomorrow we die the first naked dwel lers in caves have gone groping through their seventy years trying to penetrate the darkness waiting them has come only one glimpse of light from through the rending tomb of Jesus This Man divine as the effect of His teaching has proved came back from death to answer this universal cry of humani ty to give the world the courage of immortality As I live ye shall live The Esquimau dying to day in his hut of the Arab in the desert the poor mother in New York with her dead baby in her arms have no hope but this The hope is a certainty and it is for that certainty that we thankGod today and feebly try to symbolize the immortality of the soul by glad music and by the spring flowers which Nature sends to tell of her awakening from a death longer than any we shall know Tribune WJ1ES TO EAT It is well known that the digestion of different kinds of meat is the more easily affected the longer the time that transpires after the death of the animal The explanation given is that by keeping the muscular fibers becomes gradually dissociated they soften become less compact and con sequently are more soluble in the gas tric juice According to physiologists however it is not considered advisable to wait until the decomposition sets in because in addition to its a O great part of its nutritive qualities the meat becomes so nauseous that no amount of coeking or the addition of condiments will much improve it M M Pasteur and Lemaire iii an interesting paper submitted by them to the French Academy of Sciences stated that meat too fat advanced or what is termed iaisan is most unwholesome and it is a mistake committed daily by sportsmen to wait until game gets into this condi tion for it is then simply unfit to be eaten The abovenamed biologists have shown that tainted meat contains animalcules which do the work of transformation and destruction and as it is difficult to ascertain exactly the extent of put refaction that the meat has undergone one is liable to consume it just at the moment when it should be rejected M Pasteur and other micrographers are of the opinion that these animalcules of which there are no less than species are of the same nature as those that are found in living animals suffering from viru lent maladies such as charbon Lancet AN OFFKEKSSI2UAT10S When the Michigan cavalry brigade was sent west to wallop the Indians af ter the close of the war one of the companies in the Sixth was command ed by a Lieutenant who was hated by in his command He real ized this fact and lost no opportunity to make it warm for the boys One evening when the regiment went into camp on the banks of the far beyond Omaha the Lieutenant risged up a fish line and slipped oft down the stream to try his luck Rattlesnakes were plenty out there then and it was well known that the officer had a hor ror of them He was fishing away getting a nibble now and then when one of the boys stole forward to with in ten feet of him and hoarsely whis pered For Heavens sake Lieutenant dont move hand or foot Theres a big rattler in the grass behind you The officer was a man of nerve and though he heard every word he made no move He realized the situation and after a moment replied Cant you kill it too near you Ill go to camp for a gun and come up on the flank 1 The officer heard the man crawl away and he sat like a statute The fish began to bite but he dared not move his arms He saw the sun go down and the darkness found him as rigid as a post When he had been iu the situation for forty minutes he Citild stand it no longer Gathering his breath and muscle he made a leap into the water and after swimming and waddingfor thirty rods he climb ed out and struck for camp as vet as a rat and loaded down with mud The story had gone around the camp and at least 400 men were out to greet his return and question him regard the length of the reptile The officer took a solemn vow to make somebody sweat for that trick but he fell before an Ins dians bullet before he had secured his revenge substitute for the timehonored bottle for carrying records of disas ater at sea is found in a light rubber ball two or three feet in diameter and brightly painted It is so light that it is rapidly carried before the wind and is so conspicuous that it can be seen at a long distance One of these couriers having been thrown from a SweedUh steamer on her way from London to Gothenburg was picked up four days afterwarj on the coast of Schleswig and another traveled two hundred nautical miles in five days A number of these couriers even thrown overboard in midocean might ring relief to a disabled steamer by arrying word to passing vessels of the probable position of the disabled ship origin of the term catch penny is said to be that after the ex ecution in London of one Weare for murder a publisher named Catchpin printed a penny ballad entitled We ie alive When cried on the streets it sold to the extent of 300 copies the persons buying suppos ing from the sound the ballad had reference to Weare It cams there fore to be spoken of as a catchpenny Baltimore gentlemen writes that he knows a young man who ad dressed a girl by letter asking her to be hisn and she answered oa a postal card declining the honor whereupon ae placad a Icent stamp and her ad dress OB the back of her photograph and returned it by mail He was shockingly ungallant but still it was tit fur tat have no enemies but the people who abuse animals and the men who abuse animals are never dangerous to anybody else They wouldnt even hurt the animals if they could defend them Bergh woman lay three days in a trance at Big On re iovering she believed that she had diedand come to life as another per son This delusion cannot be dispelled hongh in other respects she is sane said the landlord point ng to his block of new houses they re all the one at the end Hats last but not now levies a tax rf each of her liquor saloons and the Citv Council is talking of raising it to A1TESDISG TO KEROSKSK LAMPS Kerosene oil is generally used for Iglits in the country and the cleaning of lamp chiramcys is quite tiresome but must be attended to every day The burners often get out of fix and it is very vexatious to tccp them inrun ning order When they are clogged will not turn up or down and arc all covered with sout and gum do not throw them away but take a little iron kettle ftnd put in i pint of wood ashes and a quart of water put in thj burners and set them on the stove and let them boil five or ten minutes take them out and with a soft rag wash them clean and dry them well They are then as good as new and will do another six months It is very little trouble to do it and saves much vexa tion After one has tried it once she will not be apt to forget it Nicc clean lamps are quite orna mental while a smoky chimney and bad smelling burners are not agree able my said the cash ier handing the customer a pile of sil ver dollars is your Count it to be sure it is all The customer begins to two so on up to seventeen then he puts the pile in his tlic remark Oh its correct as far as Ive rest must be right also Choatc once chided his clerk for not charging a client more for a certain service rendered I took penny the man was the meek answer Then Choate ran his hands through his curly locks and said Young man you did the best you could under the circumstances and your conduct in the affair has been strictly Somerville a machinist employed in the lock works at Stam ford is so exptrt in his business that he can cut an ordinary sewing machine needle in two lengthwise drill a hole through each halfj and then fasten them together so accurately that tho place where it was seperatcd cannot be seen P Dunn attempted to kill his family on Saturday at Blooming ton 111 He first wounded his wife shot and fatally He next fired at but missed his son a young man and attacked his daughter with knife but was overpowered by hisson fore he afflicted any injury upon her girls make successful thieves for no one likes to suspect them A bright bruhett il lustrated this at Astoria N the other day She went into the choir of a church during the service and walked off with the sealskins and gear of the singers one of the Yorkshire churches two shelves are filled each Sunday with loaves of bread for the poor K o person is entitled to a loaf unless he sits the entire service out Were it not for this restriction it would be very expensive to keep the custom up Kearney the notorious sandlot howler is so completly outof favor with politicians even of the lowest type that he cannot get a pal try ward office in San Francisco He is known as a political dead beat and shunned by all suits araiiut women are becoming so numerous that ere long no woman will feel safe in listening to the tender nothings of a lover without securing from him a renouncement of all claims Against iier estate i Houses of the Ohio Legisla ture have decided to submit the liquor question to a vote of the people on amending the Constitution The ques tion now will be license or prohibition rA Miasissipps dog bit Ja boyi nose and swallowed   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication