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Indiana Gazette Newspaper Archive: December 7, 1998 - Page 10

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Publication: Indiana Gazette

Location: Indiana, Pennsylvania

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   Indiana Gazette (Newspaper) - December 7, 1998, Indiana, Pennsylvania                                The Indiana Gazette Coming events Blairsville Grange Will ineet at 6 Tuesday in ihe grange hall for a Christmas covereddish party Program and i visit froin Santa will follow Par ents and grandparents are asked to bring a gift for their child The committee is Glenn and Lois Geyer and Harry and Gladys Owing Armstrong Grange Will hold their Christmas sup per at G Wednesday at the grange hall in Parkwood Bring a covered dish dessert and a non perishable food item for the food bank United Commercial Travelers Council 598 Will hold their regular meeting Thursday at the Calvary Hvangdical Church on Ben lranklin Road South Lifesteps Senior Friends Christmas party Will be held at 6 Thursday at the First Christian Church 500 Water Indiana The party in clmlcs a dinner by Brookside Catering followed by entertain ment by the Indiana Chorus Anyone interested in becom ing friends with a senior citizen with developmental disabilities call Lifesteps at 724 3491122 to register for this event Laura Lamar Class of 1954 Will hold a class reunion meet ing at 7 Tuesday at the Red Barn Sportsman Club Ask Anne Nan Anne Adams and Nancy NashCummings TO OUR READERS CON JERNING THE SAFETY AND DISPOSAL OF AMMUNITION short time ago H of Poncha oula wrote to ask our advice on how best to clean minute bits of rust and corrosion from the oose ammunition her partner lad been carrying around in his ruck We advised her to dispose of the ammunition immediately toting that corroded ammuni ion is an accident waiting to lappen Bryce Towsley of East Clarendon offers the clearest explanation of where we went wrong He writes Your answer in todays column on ammunition is an overreac tion and not exactly correct I vork as a technical gun and liuniing writer and am very well versed in ihe manufacture con struction and use of ammuni ion The truth is thai there is very little danger in carrying ammo on the dash or any other place in the vehicle Yes arnmo should be stored in a container and not al lowed to roll around free but lhats a matter of housekeeping more than one of safely There is no way to assess the level of corrosion without seeing the ammo bul if ii is enough to affect the ammo case structural ly then yes it is unsafe to use However if the corrosion is deep affect the integrity of the ammo it will likely have he effect of allowing moisture into the priming compound thus rendering it inert Based on the description in the letter I suspect tiie corrosion is cosmetic and if it is cleaned off the ammo is fine to use I should note that with very few exceptions such as water fowl sholshell modern ammo contains no ferrous metals so rust cannot form The corrosion is likely an oxidaiion of the sur face of the brass casing or case head in shells Without a qualified examina tion you are correct in telling H not to use the ammo but there is no danger in keeping it in a box There is also little reason to bring it to the police If she wishes lo dispose of the ammo burying it will solve the problem The only way I can see an accident hap pening by carrying ammo on the dashboard is if it rolls off and dis tracts the driver The only way ammo can explode is if a sharp and focused blow is presented to the primer causing ihe primer case lo collapse onto the internal anvil or if the temperature reach es a high enough level to ignite the powder inside the case Both events are extremely to Bruce The information we used in our answer came oddly enough from a gun collec whp is also a member of the NRA Go figure The ncxi time we get a question like this well come to you for advice Dr Thomas Newton cofounder of Hilton Head Longevity Center stands in front of his practice recently in Hilton Head The quest for the fountain of youth which once led Spanish explorers to the wilds of Flori da now leads this medical center and others across the country where doctors seek to slow down the aging process AP photo Doctors seek fountain of youth By BRUCE SMITH Associated Press BLUFFTON The quest for the fountain of youth which once led Spanish explorers to the wilds of Florida now leads to quite a differ ent place a small office park among the outlet shops golf courses and boutiques lining the road to posh Hilton Head Island Here at the Hilton Head Longevity Center as well as a growing number of other centers and medical prac tices across the country doctors practicing antiaging medicine work to slow and even reverse the aging process What 15 years ago might have been considered medical sleightof hand has become mainstream med icine as doctors use hormone re placement therapy nutritional sup plements diet and exercise pro grams to retard the effects of aging The focus right now is on improv ing the quality of said Dr Thomas Newton cofounder of the Hilton Head center that opened about a year ago and now has about 70 patients Antiaging medicine seeks to move life expectancy 76 to 79 years for Americans toward the limits of the human life span of about 120 years allowing people to live longer more active lives Future medical ad vances might even increase the life span Newton said Donna Powell wasnt necessarily looking to live longer when she ar rived at the center She just wanted to live normally She had symptoms that included hair loss dry skin low energy and cravings for food A year and a half of tests with regular doctors found nothing The clinic immediately di agnosed the condition as menopause though she was just 45 and not having hot flashes Doctors said she was a 45yearold woman with a 55yearold body A month later Powell was back to normal on a program of vitamin supplements diet and exercise and hormone replacement therapy It basically comes down to your she said Am I worth this Ab solutely 1 am ultimately responsible for my health and the direction of my She likes the idea of having doctors on the cutting edge of aging devel opments If you are doing the right thing with vitamins and exercise and eat ing habits you are going to live she said And they are going to hear about new things New patients at the foot clinic take a dozen tests that measure things like heart and lung function hearing sensitivity memo ry motor movement and body chemistry They also discuss with doctors their lifestyle and future ex pectations The results provide a blueprint for Newton two other doctors and a staff of nurses to develop a treat ment plan Newton estimates that an anti aging program started early enough perhaps when a person is in his or her 30s can add 20 quality yearsto life Once looked at with skepticism by mainline medicine antiaging med icine is now a clinical medical spe cialty The first board exam was given this past December and there are 150 doctors board certified in the disci pline The Chicagobased American Academy of AntiAging Medicine A4M for short has members and is doubling that every year Fifteen years ago antiaging med icine was science said Dr Ronald Klatz the academys presi dent Todays antiaging medicine is hard core medical fact There is no question we can slow the aging process for most people and reverse it for In five years he predicted anti aging practices will be as common as other medical practices As the 77 million baby boomers about 29 percent of the population approach old age either we start a national program to build nursing homes as fast as we can or we em brace a new paradigm of medicine which is antiaging Klatz said Vicki Joy a spokeswoman for the academy said antiaging is the ulti mate preventative medicine If you can feel better and look younger and you can narrow the window of time at the end of your life when you are suffering from a terminal illness why not do it she asked Engagements YAVETTE GRIFFITH and BRIAN LYNCH Yavette Griffith and Brian Lynch both of Oviedo Fla announce their recent engagement The bridetobe is the daughter of Roger Griffith of Plumville and Sherry Pitrone of In diana The future groom is the son of Robert and Joyce Lynch of Oviedo The bridetobe is a 1988 graduate of Marion Center High School She is currently attending Valencia Com munity College in Florida majoring m computer programming She is employed in the billing department of AmeriSys in Oviedo Her fiancd is a 1990 graduate of Washington High School in Philadelphia Me is employed by Watkins Motor Lines in Oviedo No wedding date has been set at this time KRISTEN SUPER and RODNEY PEGG Francis and Colleen Super of Cly mer announce the engagement of their daughter Kristen Super to Rodney Pegg the son of Charles and Shirley Pegg of Indiana The future bride is a 1994 graduate of Mount Aloysius College in Cres son where she earned an associate degree in nursing She is currently attending West moreland County Community Col lege majoring in dental hygiene She is employed by Dr Ralph Gilliland Her fiance1 is a 1991 graduate of Marion Center High School He is employed by Sergent Electric Co of Pittsburgh An Aug wedding is being planned BRIE WISSINGER and EDWARD MUMAU Brie Ann Wissinger and Edward Wayne Mumau both of Indiana an nounce their recent engagement The bridetobe is the daughter of Rik and Bev Wissinger of Indiana Her fiance is the son of Lenny and Fran Mumau also of Indiana The future bride is a 1995 graduate of Indiana High School and is em ployed at First Commonwealth In surance Agency The future groom is a 1994 gradu ate of Indiana High School and is employed at Mark TK Welding A September 2000 wedding is planned Reminder All photographs submitted to the Indiana Gazette for publication become the property of the newspaper An attempt will be made to return the photographs upon request however there is no guarantee that pictures will be returned after publication Marriage licenses Dale Ellsworth Matty Home and Julia Christine Wagner Home Andrew Scott Dunkle Indiana and Laura Anne Miller Indiana Steven James Crusan Blairsville and Lillian Mae Greenwood Blairsville Dale Eugene Madden Com modore and Helen Nancy Hutchinson Commodore Joseph Reed Hunter II Pitts burgh and Susan Lucille Carter Indiana Ronald Wayne Marsh Dixonville and Melissa Marie Burba Arcadia Thomas James Khupp Blairsville and Kelly Jo Shirley Blairsville Monday December 7 1998 Page 10 Happy people grin and share it By UZ STEVENS Times News Service If youre happy and you know it keep it to yourself thanks Happiness it sometimes seems has gone the way of Tab cola and Milli Vanilli fading into oblivion Its hip to be hopeless stylish to be stressed and popular to be a pitiable sap spreading gloom and bad juju Even Ann Landers seems to be toe ing the No one wants to hear about your good fortune line Maybe its the Jerry Springer effect Whatever it is Pam Johnson is tired of it shes not mad mind you because that would be a waste of mental energy Instead she is doing something to counteract the nega tivity she encounters daily In August Johnson founded the Secret Society of Happy People It might sound corny OK it does sound but Johnsons mes sage strikes a universal chord We spend way too much time whining about our problems and way too lit tle time acknowledging the good moments There ate 100something 12step groups that exist and that has a place in our Johnson says but theres really not much out there that says Its OK to be happy just Think about conversations with friends family and coworkers They probably focus on negative events Johnson notes If you go to work and you tell peo ple that youre happy people make jokes they dont want to hear she adds On the other hand If you have a horrible morning you get a lot of Johnson points to a recent Ann Landers column in which the advice maven agreed with writers who in sisted that people who send holiday cards should omit their good news Spare us the details of the Ivy League schools your children are at tending and the honors and awards they have received during the year wrote me ornery Your Cousins in In response Johnson drafted a news release calling the column a blatant public example of the atti tude she is combating and sent it via overnight mail to various TV person alities and talkshow hosts Johnson who lives in Irving began teaching personal empowerment workshops at local community cen ters several years back Her clients encouraged her to publish a newsletter and Johnson added a humor column following the antics of a fictitious Secret Society of Happy People The madeup mem bers of SSOHP were so vilified by the outside world that they wore bags over their heads at meetings But then real people started asking Johnson if they could join the club and voila The Web site went up in September the first newsletter is scheduled for mailing this month and more than 50 people nationwide have coughed up to become official members Each one receives a Tshirt lapel pin bumper sticker quarterly newsletter and opportunity for a pen The goal of SSOHP is to move peo ple away from bonding based on a term coined by Anatomy of the Spirit author Caro line Myss I dont think theres any thing wrong with overcoming your says Johnson 32 But weve come to a place where we wear them like a badge of Theres a lot of very heavy things in life daytoday either personally or worldwide and I think sometimes this whole idea of happiness does get says Joan Teeter a SSOHP member in Waverly Teeter like Johnson works as a regional repre sentative for the publishing arm of the Minnesotabased Hazelden Foundation famous for its addic tiontreatment center I think a lot of people become connected through pain and Im not saying that thats a bad Teeter adds But there seems to be this component that thats all they talk about and theres so much more to life than Johnson urges a stopandsmeil theroses approach Give as much time to dwelling on the great things in life as to the cruddy stuff she says and encourage others to share posK live thoughts Most people laugh at me at first and then they get Johnson says Its one of those things that they al ready somewhat When you deal with people who have a positive outlook who arent afraid to be happy and admit that theyre happy it tends to rub says Andre Freimann a neighbor of Johnsons and SSOHP member You know when you smile other people Club News Girl of the Month named The Womens Club of Homer City named Jennifer Craig as Girl ofthe Month for December and Abby George as January Girl of the Month at their Peace Candlelight Service and meeting The club was entertained by the Sweet Adelines who joined club members in the singing portion of the Candlelight Service Poetry program presented Mrs George Hlusko and Mrs William Fiscus presented a program of poems and memories of Christmases long ago at the Dec 1 meeting of the Indiana County Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Members sang a medley of Christmas songs with musical accompaniment by Fiscus Delegates and alternates elected to the April 1999 Continental Congress in Washington DC are Mrs William Stivison Mrs Joseph Rura and Mrs Ken neth Snyder Definition of death changes with technology DEAR DR GOTT In the old days a person was considered dead when he ceased breathing and his heart stopped beating Now its not so simple we constantly hear about braindead people Isnt this just a handy definition for doctors to use so that they can get organs for transplants DEAR READER No It is a more ac curate indication of death A person doesnt die all at once Some tissues are more resistant than others to lapk of oxygen For exam ple a patients heart can stop beat ing without death taking place This happens in every instance of open heart Even outside an oper ating room a heart can be salvaged put in cold storage and transplant ed Finally a person can suffer car diac arrest and be legally dead but can be resuscitated and returned to normal Similarly if respiration stops ma chine ventilation can keep the bodys organs alive indefinitely In medical technology enables certain patients to live despite the fact that their hearts and lungs are not functioning on their own Brain tissue however is extremely sensitive to lack of oxygen The brain cannot survive if It is deprived of oxygen and nutrients for more than about three minutes Unfortunately no current medical techniques can correct or replace a damaged brain Therefore the traditional view of death on heart stoppage or respira tory cessation is too narrow a defini tion At present brain death is a more useful and realistic concept It is diagnosed by a strict set of criteria that includes analysis of brain activi ty by a brainwave test Aside from giving doctors a con clusive endpoint to life the notion of brain death permits scientists to ex tract other organs that are not dead and reuse them in the form of transplants as you pdirit out In the future as medical technolo gy improves the concept of brain death will probably have to be re vised For instance doctors may someday be able to resuscitate the brain artificially Then a new defini tion of death will be worked out Bui for now brain death is Ihe most ap propriate criterion of whether a per son has passed the point where tra ditional death can be reversed i   

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