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Huntingdon Daily News Newspaper Archive: May 16, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Huntingdon Daily News

Location: Huntingdon, Pennsylvania

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   Daily News (Newspaper) - May 16, 1942, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania                                STATE UIBRARY HARRISBURG 1 EDUCATION BUILDINQ THE WEATHER VOL 21 HUNTINGDON PA SATURDAY MAY 16 1M2 NAZIS PLAN LAST MTffl DEFENSE BEFORE KHARKOV OFFICIAL WORD ON DEATH OF COUNTY SOLDIER RECEIVED Parents Of Sheaffer Get Notice From War December 26 Mr and Mis William Sheaffer of Biady township in Big Valley received a letter from the WaiDe paitment Fuday May 15 con fliming the news that their son Benjamin had been killed in ac tion m the Philippines December 26 1941 No details of how 01 exactly wheie the boy died were contained in the letter The last that the Sheaffers had heard from their sonwas when he wasstationed at Fort Mills in Manila Bay For a month and a half the Sheaffeis have been trying to learn the status of their ing to hear good news despite a letter received from a cousin stat ing Suiely soiiy to leain that Ben has died This letter was writen in February by Bens cou sin James Andetson of Tyione Pa to his patents m Tyione and was i clayed by them to the Sheaffers after it was received Apiil 2 Immediately Mr and Mrs Sheaffer contacted the War Der partment and checked with the Red Cross and had Congressman Richaid M Simpson tiying to Jearn of their sons whereabouts from the War Department The longer they went without con firmation the more hope they had that the information in the Ander son boysletter had been erron eous i The sad news that came to his paients yesteiday places Ben Sheaffer as the first known casualty of the war in Hunting don county Ben and his JimAnder son enlisted togethei m the legu lar armyfor foieign service two Continued on Page Sixi GET 2WEEK FURLOUGH AFTER INDUCTION New Plan To Go In Effect June 15 Government To Pay Expenses Of Trip Washington May 16 The aimy and selective service head quarters today anounced plans to grant selectees a twoweek fur lough immediately after induc tion to permit their return home at government expense to adjust personal affaus Effective June 15 the new arrangement icplaces the present system of 10day furloughs upon requests and is designed to elim inate any injustices which might occur to men incucted immediate ly following physical examination by the army If found qualified for military duty by army medical men at the induction center a selectee would be transferred to the enlisted re serve corps for a 14day period He thus would be able to return home before he is called to active duty Transportation and mealsen route from the induction center to the locality of the board which ordeied a selectee to report would be paid by the government The army said the procedure Continued Or Page Ten BAN IS PLACED ON SPECIAL BUS TRIPS NonEssential Service Will Save Gasoline And Tires Harrisburg May tered bus service for nonessen tial civilian purposes was a thing of the past in Pennsylvania today under a public utility commission order suspending all public con venience certificates under which it was allowed The suspension effective until further notice was to conserve tires and gasoline as well as to niake available all possible roll ing stock for public transporta tion necessary to the war effort Excepted from the ban was transportation of groups of de fense workers where lack of such serface will impede the war ef fort transportation of selectees or of groups made up principally of members of armed forces par ticipants in organized activities at military posts school children teachers and school employes Meanwhile Commissioner Rich ard J Beamish characterized the states role in the present short age of motor trucks transporta on Page Three U S Envoy Does His Part Nelson T Johnson United States minister to Austiaha ides his bicycle to the Ameiican lega tion at Canberra to help Austra lians save gasoline ALLIEDPLANES HIT AT SURPRISED JAP LAE INVASION BASE Rain Bombs On And Start Big Fires In Buildings On HuonGuIf CorrespoDtlent Melbourne May Gen Douglas MacArthuis United Na tions placescaught the Japanese I asleep at their importaTit Lae in vasion base on the Huon Gulf of noithein New Guinea and in one of then most eftective lamed bombs on runways and started big fires in buildings it was announced today It was the fust time the United States and Austiahan fliers in their new Ameiican planes had been over Lae since a reconnbiter ing flight May 7 dm ing the last phase of the Coral Sea battle Then the Allied planes weie looking for signs of Japanese le Inforcements In their laid yesterday they weie exclusively on the attack DMINGDON WILL OBSERVE MEMORIAL DAY ASJN PAST Committees Are Named At Meeting To Plan For Annual Wais come and wars go but Huntingdon will observe Memorial Day this year just aa in past yeais when peace and quiet reigned over this fair nation of equal lights and privileges Thats the latest ncwa received and present plans call for an even greater patiiotic observ ance of this memoiable day Memorial Day will not be cele biated m honor of the heroes who died in past wars alone because the thoughts of those who have passed on in Woild War H will go hand in hand with those of others conflicts On Wednesday evening of this week a special meeting was held in the American Legion Home to make anangements for Memorial Day in this ear 1942 Repieren tatives ftom the various patriotic and fraternal organizations of the town discussed the obseivaree of Decoration Day Everyone was all out in their ideas foi the holding of the annual parade chuich services and covering of graves with flowers This means one will ob serve its greatest Day in history The following committees weie named to plan for arrange and carry to completion the Memorial Day celcbiation They have been announced by D Harvey Fair geneial chairman of the Memorial Day program Parade marshal Mr Philip Short Mr Clarence Dick Mr Leon Neff and Mrs Geoige Rupert Speaker John M DesRochers Mr JohnR Dell and Mrs Gaird Hood Platform and Chairs Mr Clarence Dick Veter ans of Foreign Wars Boy Scouts Mr John Winters Flags and Grave Mr ContinueclOnPage GAS TO GET PUBLICITY HENDERSON STATES All Rationing To Be Ordered To Open Records For Inspection United Press Correspondent By HILLIER KRIEGHBAtJM Administrator Leon Henderson to the much bombed base in chaos MacAithuK said in his com munique that the Japanese weie taken by suipiise and that the Allied aviatois landed all their bombs in the target aiea The Lae raid immediately fol lowed shattering attacks Thurs day on neaiby Rabaut m New Britain Island and on the enemys increasingly impoitaiit seaplane base at Deboyne Island in the Louisaides The pattern of Allied bombing in the northeastern invasion area plainly indicated that MacArthurs airciaft weie still on the hunt for the assembly of enemy naval and tianspoit f01 ccs and of reinforc ing airplanes especially the sea planes based at Deboyne Island Australia was still on the alert for a new Japanese move and kept it in mind that MacArthur m leporting the repulse of the enemy fleet the Coral Sea em phasized that fighting has ceased only temporarily eis suspected of obtaining high allowance cards by misrepresen tation Taking his cue from President Roosevelts press conference re marks in favor of publicity on holders of X cards permitting unlimited purchases Henderson announcedthathe will issue adi restion today oidermg all ration ing boards to opsn their records to public inspection as soon as practicable His action will make it possible to determine the type of ration cards issued to Congressmen in volved m a teapot explosion on capitol hill OPA officials said there has been a trend among motorsts holding X and B3 cards ths latter good for 57 gallons Of gasoline during the initial seven week turn in their pasteboards for cards of lower allowances Trey precVted that if the trend continues and grows there will be practically no need for changing the present Continued On Page Ten Warriors School Graduates GERMANS FLEE TO RIVER LINE REDS INCREASE TEMPO Commanders Tell Retreating Men To Blow Up All Arms Ammunition In WakeU S Tanks Active The three honor graduates of Warriors Maik High School aie shown above top rowreading left to right they aie Ruby Ross Dons Geist and Helen Hatton all of Wainors Maik On bottom low are the officers of the ciaas to right Gene Haipster president Wauiors Mark Leona Brown secretary Spruce Cieek Florence Yinger vicepresident Tyrone R D 4 and Steve Cushion treasurer Tyrone R D 4 DROWNING VICWS Churchill Says BODY TAKEN HOME ccDVirro cnwh A v Wl11 Top SERVICES SUNDAY Number Of William Micklet i College Funeral The body loC William Stanford Mickle Jumata College l student who losfhis life by the Raystown dam on Thuisday after noon shortly before 4 oclock was tuined ovei to Undertaker V G Geisel of Alum Bank Bedford county at 6 last evening to be burial Tentative luneial arrangements weie for sei vices at late home of the youth in Schellsburg Bedford county Sunday afternoon A number of the students at Juniata College as well membeis will attendee services Mickles body was lecoveired fiom the dam oclock Washington May 16 Price yesterday afteinoon by aseaicK mg party of fellow students at JC1XUW oLUUCJlLo ZLL day threw the spotlight of pub Jumata College composed of John licity on gasoline ration chisel Savior of PntbstTmn Rriura4 Saylor of Pottstown Bdwaid Minaya of Bionc N T and Jpick ODoriinell The body bioughtto Browns funeial Milk Control Board May Become Political Issue t L Dealers Riled At New Order Restricting Be Lowered By RICHARD X IARKIN United Press Correspondent Hamsburg May ity that the State Milk Conrotl Commission may Become a prime political issue during the gubsr natorial campaign was sesn today as the agency prepared to issue milk delivery restricting orders almost certain to intnscnize nrany dealers and producers Faced with blunt orders from the office of defense transporta tion to eliminate tne frills of milk delivery and call for sub stantial delivery rmleag6 induc tions at the sameUrns milk deal ers were unanimous in that something must he Jone However most of their represent those who cussed disagreed on what should be done and left the commssion with the unhappy task of vnting an order which will IIRKO the nec essary savings ot critiia mate rials Already in the primary cam paign the commission nas been under attack by Judge Ralph H Smith Pittsburgh candvJaie for the Democratic gubvnatoial nomination who promised real I enforcement of the uct if elected For several years the commission has been subjected to rela tively sporadic fire of those who thought no milk control aw Is necessary those who tbvugit a Jone J Uifferent act was and merely sought dffer homb m riuntingdon pending ai nval of the Alum Bank undei taker The thiee students who re coveied the body weie patrohng the area wheie ihe youth was last seen Saylor using a giapphng hook attached to a rope to drag the bottom of the dam Thehook snaggedthe bathing sut of the victim of the tragedy and his body was soon brought to the surface and to the shore The body w as re covered in appioximately the same location where it was last Continued on Page Six AIR RAID WARDENS COMPLETE COURSES J W Shilling 1 Firtt Huntingdon To Get Certificate In The proud possessor of the first certificate of qualification and ap pointment as an air raid warden issued in the borough is J Will iam Shilling of 151S Washington street The certificate pre sented yesterday by William H Woolverton chief air raid warden for the county m a brief cere mony in the new offices of the Huntingdon county council of De fense on Fifth atrcet Mr Shilling is at preseTTT1 senior warden in post number ten hav ativps at a statewide nean lasr I ert commissioners Chairman week when tne matter was disJ Continued On Page Ten Leeds Eng May Minister Winston Churchill said in a speech today that we have reached a periodpf the war wheru itwould beJpremature to say we ave Tf ationswUl come on fhe ndge heT i con iiojvc Ni on nugc nc iun tinuedt and then the chance not only of Cheating dowiT and aubduingrj those evil forces which have twice let rum and havoc on the world but they will have further and grander prospect beyond the smoke of battle and the of the fight We 9fe that perseverance un flinching dogged inexhaustible tireless valiant will surely carry us and our allies the great na tions of the and the un fortunate nations who have been enslaved on to one deepest founded movementsof humanity Which have taken place in our history ALLIES AND AXIS EXCHANGESTARTED 958 AxU Reach Lisbon Allies Ready vr To Board Ship REJ JOHN PETERS AT HIGH SCHOOL EXERCISES Mark To nkltri To uauijf as his subject The At PresbyGenan chuich of Hunting don last night the grad uating of Warriors Mark School to Jhav definiteVairhs in life and to read toward goals Mr Peters was th commence m en tr exercises held theWac riors MarkMethodiatfchurclcari attended Sy av parents and Txriends seniors r iV Twentytvvo their diplomas ftnmii of B theTcouhty supen tendenta of f o The theme of the cpmrnence ment was What To Us and was intrcifucedtmlfiw salutatory Lisbon May 16 United Nations and the Axis began ex changing diplomats newapaper and civilians today The Swedish liner Drottingholm arrived at 8 a m 3 a m EWT with 958 Axis citizens aboard vrtiile three trains of Allied diplo mats and citizens from Germany and four from Italy arrived to be traded for their Police ordered the Drottmg holm to remain off the quay un til the passports of all aboard had been checked Only German and Italian ministers were allowed to go aboard in meantime and it was 10 a m before the ship finally tied up A crowd of Italians and Ger mans who live in Lisbon stood on the quay waving handkerchiefs Th Germans of whom there were 606 leave for hojne tomor row on three trains As soon as all Allied citizens In cluded in this exchange arrived and the Drottningholm is refueled and revictualed It will return to New York Continued On Page Ten CUT ON HEAD WITH AXE IN ACCIDENT JOtuiaLWi y Ul ittlun Dj Geist one of following the proces3lonatfplaye by the high schoolorchestra and invocation by the Rev B F Shue The next senior orationfol lowed in the sametheme and wa entitled We Start Are1 and was ably presented b Richard Gensimore Mary Jan Knarr next presented an interest ing discussion along the sam line called The next number vof the pro gram was a Is Lie by WilmaGray Barbar Mattern then described the differ ence betsveen the United Nation and the Axis in an oration calleu What We and They Stand For Ruby Ross another honor grad uate spoke on the angle of the present war effort using as her subject What We Are Doing Now The final student oration WBJJ the valedictory and was entitled Where Do We Go From Here The valedictorian of the class Continued On Page Ten By HENRY SHAPIRO United Press Correspondent Moscow May 16 commanders have ed their men to retreat to a river line before Kharkov for a last ditch defense and blow up all arms and ammunition intheir wake special dispatches from the front said today The Exchange Telegraph in London received i Moscow dispatch saying that the Russian forces penetrated the German lines several more miles and continuing to advance The order for the retreat was contained in an enemy divisional order of the iay captured by the Kussians in an offensive which increased hourly in ferocity against Russias fourth city indus trial capital of the Ukraine It ordered the new defense line built half a mile west of the river STRONG JAPANESE DRIVE IS STOPPED AT SALWEEN RIYERi which the Russian command did not reveal IThe river might be any of rev el al including an arm sof the Donets which flovvs about 25 miles east of the city Picked Red army infantrymen borneiinnew monster tanks veri table land battleships thmselves against1 the weakening German defensesbefore Kharkov on a front of 40 miles or more flattened the thicWyvilIaged area and smashed columns ot reserve troops whichxthe Germans desperately moved up to the front In one smalKsubsector planes destroyed 70 tanks 53 ammunition trucks and 11field guns tank columns were re size to avoid the deadly attack and they sought to avoid mam roads and hug forests army Stai northwestern had suffered that on the front the enemy enormous casualties in attacks by Continued On Announce ORHS Baccalaureate dee For May 17 The Kaycalaureate service for the senior of OibfsoniaRoakhil High be held Sunday evening oclock in of Orbi sonia Rev Dun can SaTmona will the class using as his subject A Lad the Lord Loved The commencement exercises will be held Friday evening May 22 at oclock the high Thjsfull program follows Processional Rev Arthur A Price Hymn Prayer of Confession Lord s Prayer Vocal Solo JShepnerd Take He By Tny Hand by Ward Steph ensoa Esther Wilson Scriptures Rev Martin Edward Wilson Prayer Rev Martin Shoulton The Presentation of Offerings Hymn Sermon A Lad the Loved Rev Duncan syron Benediction Rev Arthur A Price Says Axis Subs Could Be Wiped Out In 90 Days Chinese Halt Drive NortK Of Burma Road la Southern China Epidemic Rages By KOBERT P United Press Correspondent Chungking May nese today stemmed Japanese ef foits vto i crossthe Salween river a road in Occasional Rain Today Cooler Today And Much Cooler Tonight NO 92 Yung Chang The Japanese had persistently tried to cross it reported but the terrain was so wild and rag ged it gave the Chinese the ad vantage The Japanese could not use mechanized equipment and it was noi believed they could bring up heavy artilleiy AllIndia radia heard in London quoted military circles in Chunking that the situation in Yunnan province was stabilized A cholera epidemic raged among refugees of the invasion of Burma and China and authorities at Kuming appealed to all citi Contmued On Page Ten American Cargo Ship Sunk Near Mississippi Mouth New Orleans May An enemy submarine sank a large Ameiican cargo ship one and one half miles from the mouth of the Mississippi river JviHmg 27 of the 4 man ciew last Tuesday the eighth naval district announced yesterday afternoh iFour of the 14 survivois were buined critically They leaped from the burning ship and swam for 30 the svnft cur rent before rescued by a coast guard cutter arid vessels of the naval districtsinshore patrol Capt Larson Squan tum Mass went down with the 26 others who xvere tiapped by the flames The vessel bUmed for six houis and then sank feet of water after it was sfciuck by three torpedoes Senator Claims Large Fleet Of Torpedo And Do Job Sub Alice Moffctt Moffelt of R wife of By 3OHX R BESL United Press Correspondent Washington May warden in post number ten hav wiic 01 j ivasmngion May ing been appointed to that post Pamcl Moffelt of R Hunt James At Mead D N Y today lion when John Bagshaw look is a pitient in J Cj urged the navy to consider use of AH frV Slitr ACClTlGtift1 HnanitlSl C la VOTa ft AM I nf f Wrtrt tn ft lion when John Bagshaw look is a pitient in J Cj urged the navy to consider use of over the duties or district war7 Memoriaj hospital suffering a large fleet of torpedo boats and den for the borough He has 3ac ralton chasers as a means of end pleted and satisfactorily passed S u to ing the Atlantic submarine the complete training course for lhtr v ni8M mensce within 60 to M air raid wardens consisting of M offett was cubing wiod Recently returned from an in general course specific duties 1 Was eithcr tour ot Pl1f ship gas defense fire defense and first or yars Mead an mterv cvy aid Air raid post number ten which is hetded by Mr Shilling has pronounced by the Council as cne of the isaders in the borougn ft was originally organized by Mr and has always h i Continued on Three clothes line and rebounded strik ing her on the forehead The skull bone was exit but the force of the Wow was nat sufficient to pene tratr the full thickness of the skull She rested well tTnnnr the and her condition is not se that he is convinced the awift and deadly craft present the an swei to Axis marauders which have taken a heavyXoli of United Nations shippingjn hemisphere waters Recalling the daring exploits of Lieut John D Bulkley whose tiny FT squadron Japt ncse xvarslups and merchajit ves sels before the fall of Corrcgidor Mead said that if the naval h ros recital of his feat is the testi mony of experience and we know It a huge mosquito fleet will stop the submarine men ace Bulkeley who earned Douglas MacAithur from Philippines to Australia through the Japanese blockadetold re ptrters on his arrival in San Fran cisco early this month that his squadron destroyed v a 6000ton enemy cruiser six Bother vessels and four warplanes before it was cv tr ao aiun vc coroner SAYS 10SS SMITH USING STATE CARS a r Manager Hitt At Of Autos In Campaign Philadelphia May l General F Clair Ross and Judge Ralph H Pittsburgh rival candidates for Democratic gubernatorial nomination were charged today with state automobiles in their campaign s The charge was tleveled by H G Andrews campaign manager for Luther Harrf Uie Inird man in tha Andrews said thag stateowned rJ cars operated by slate employes I are burning rubber and conV sunrng gasoline inthe interest of Ross and Smith He also charged that Ross vas padding his pay roll to finance his primary cam patgn with public funds Meanwhile the Democratic city committee dodged a aland in the heated piimary fight 3 The committee held a brief ses slon yesterday some Continued On Page ejected former H Hersch as on Page   

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