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Gettysburg Times Newspaper Archive: August 23, 1948 - Page 1

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   Gettysburg Times (Newspaper) - August 23, 1948, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania                                Headen And Three Others Freed Today By Russians By EDWIN SHANKE Berlin, Aug. 23 (JP) The Rus- sians released today three U. B. mili- tary government officials they had seized In blockaded Berlin and in southern Germany. The British in turn set free Franz Erdmann, head of the criminal divi- sion of the Russian-controlled east- ern Berlin police. He was arrested at a boxing match Sunday and accused of abduction of western Berlin police and "presumption of author- ity" charges that still will stand. While tension was eased a little by the cross-zone deliveries, Rus- sian soldiers crossed into the Ameri- can sector of Berlin and arrested a German photographer. He was the tenth German seized since Thurs- day by the Russians and their Ger- man police either in the western parts of Berlin or along the border. THE URG TIMES Truth Our Public Good Our Aim ESTABLISHED 1902 With Honor To Ourselves And Profit To Our Patrons QoodEvenlnc Look at the trouble third party caused In the Garden of Eden. Vol. 46, No. 201 Adams County's Only Daily Newspaper GETTYSBURG, PA., MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 23, 1948 Leased Wire Member of The AModated Preai PRICE THREE CENTS TAYLOR BARN, CROPS OF TWO FARMS BURN Damage estimated at was done when fire resulting from a bolt of lightning destroyed a barn on the farm of Lester M. Taylor, lo- cated one and one-quarter miles south of Aspers on the Aspers-Oen- ter Mills road, Sunday afternoon at o'clock. Chester McKenney and his family occupy the house on the farm but the farm work is conducted by Mr. Taylor. All crops of hay, straw and oats from the two farms of Mr. Taylor _________ _ were stored in the barn and were released today destroyed. A new rubber tire wagon which had not yet been used was destroyed together with other farm Named Officer Of Irving Alumnae Mrs. Henry M. Scharf, Hotel Get- tysburg, was elected secretary of the Irving college Alumnae association at a reunion-luncheon held at Al- lenberry inn, Boiling Springs, Satur- day. Others in attendance included Mrs. H. C- Michael, Mrs. George H. Thrush, Miss Kdith Dorsey and Miss Ruth Koser, Gettysburg, and Mrs. Oscar C. Rice, Sr., Biglerville. Mrs. Scharf sang several solos, ac- companied "by Mrs. S. F. Snyder, West Lincoln avenue. were: Thomas P. Headen, deputy head of the American military govern- ment information services division in Berlin. He was abducted yester- day in Potsdamer Plate, where the Russian, American and British zones meet. It was not clear whether he had stepped across the vague boundary. Lt. Sherman Turner of Council Bluffs, Iowa, and Roland Myers of Brooklyn, American military gov- ernment officers who were seized ,18 days ago while on a border inspec- tion. They had crossed into the Russian zone at Mellrichstadt, 75 miles from Frankfurt, apparently by mistake. The Russians tried without success to force Turner and Myers to sign a receipt saying they entered the Russian zone of Ger- many "without authority" and took illegal pictures of the border. Toward dusk, the Russians re- leased Paul Hoppe, German police chief for the Berlin borough of Kreuzberg in the U. S. zone. Ameri- can officials said Hoppe was ar- rested Saturday when he sought to negotiate the release of several of his policemen the Russians had taken. The Soviets also returned a police jeep and its driver. Headen was held 21 hours. Ameri- can officials who questioned him said the Russians did not mishandle machinery. The Aspers fire company was summoned and succeeded in saving two small buildings close to the barn. Heavy rains which filled a nearby stream furnished an ample supply of water for the four lines used by the firemen. A number of firemen remained on duty until 2 o'clock this morning. The barn measured 40 by 50 feet. The loss is partially covered by in- surance. Littlestown PLAN PLAY DAY TO END SEASON AT PLAYGROUND The Gettysburg Recreation associ- ation Thursday will hold its first annual "Play Day" to mark the for- mal close of the current playground season. For the affair, scheduled to mark the clmax of playground activities, all of the events will be at the high school and all facilities there will be available, including the football field, use of which has been granted by the school board, the association announced. The day's events will conclude NAME PROGRAM FOR CONTESTS AT PLAYGROUND Clayton L. Evans, director of the playground activities, announced to- day that there will be prizes for the with a moton picture, a concert by the Blue and Gray band, and pre- sentation of awards to various youngsters for activities on "Play Day" and during the playground season. To Give Awards Among the awards to be an- nounced Thursday night will be those to the boy and the girl who have been most cooperative in playground activities this summer, to the boy and girl who have shown the greatest leadership ability at the playgrounds and to the boy and girl who have shown the most best decorated bicycle and tricycle in courtesy on the playground. Separ- WEAVERS HOLD OPEN MEETING THIS EVENING The llth session of the National Weavers' conference convened at 9 o'clock this morning In Brua Chapel at Gettysburg college with an ad- dress by Mrs. Helen D. Young, of Washington, D. C. More than 50 weavers are expected to attend the two-week gathering here under the direction of Mrs. Osma Gallinger, of Creative Crafts, Guernsey. The ses- sions will close September 3. The meeting at 8 o'clock this eve- ning in Brua chapel will be open to the public, Mrs. Gallinger said. This is an innovation in it is cus- tomary to restrict all sessions to weavers and registered members. "However, because of the wide- spread interest in our project we have decided to open tonight's ses- sion to the public and all are in- Mrs. Gallinger said. Dr. Hanson to Speak An address of welcome will be de- livered by Dr. Henry W. A. Hanson, president of the college, followed by a talk on "The Joy of Hand Weav- by Osma Couch Gallinger, of Guernsey. Demonstrations will include: "The Art of by Loraine Kessenich, of Milwaukee. "Weaving in the World of by Helen D. Young, Washington. "Bobbin Lace by Clara McNulty, Stockton, Kansas. "Weaving for Schools and Hos- by Florence E. House, of New York city. "Belts from Many Lands." by Jo- sephine Alice Couch, of Creative Crafts, Guernsey. Chamber music will be played by (Please Turn to Page Two) Last Man's Club Meets On Friday The Last Man's club of the Sgt. William M. Steffy camp No. 126, United Spanish War Veterans will hold a supper at the VFW home, Carlisle street, Friday evening at 8 o'clock. Members of the auxiliary are in- vited. Following the supper, nomi- nation and election of officers will take place. Present officers are: President, Charles T. Zeigler; vice president, John W. Zercher, Han- over; secretary, John A. Zimmer- man. Visiting Motorist Posts Forfeit Bond Paul L. Biggerstaff, Whitman, Mass., arrested by state police of the Gettysburg sub-station Sunday on a charge of speeding, posted for- feit bail of with Justice of the Peace Robert P. Snyder. William F. Swope, Aspers R. 1. paid a fine of and costs to Squire Snyder on a reckless driving charge. Borough police, who filed the charge, said Swope drove around Center square, cutting in and out of heavy traffic on Saturday night, August 14. AT PICNIC Approximately attended the annual Moose family picnic held Sunday at the South Mountain fair grounds near Arendtsville. Despite rain which drove early arrivals into pavilions for well over an hour, the members of the local Moose lodge, their wives and children turned out for the largest attendance in> the lodge's history. the contest to be held on the play- ground tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Other events listed for the afternoon are relay races, speed races, trick riding, obstacle races, a slow race, a candle race and also some tricycle races. The contests are open to children of all ages, and will be arranged according to the age groups. The Starr Bible class of St. Paul's Lutheran church will hold its August meeting on Thursday evening at the home of Mrs. Irvin Kindig, near town. Those attending the meeting will gather at the home of Mrs. Arthur Bair, South Queen street at 7 o'clock and transportation will be. provided. In addition to the hostess, who is chairman, the August com- mittee includes Mrs. Edna Fortney and Mrs. Augustus Study. Surprise Party Held A surprise party was held in ob- servance of the 69th birthday anni- versary of Mrs. Minnie DeGroft, Lumber street, at Geiman's Park, yesterday. A picnic lunch was en- (Please turn to Face ate awards for cooperation, leader- shp and courtesy will be made for each playground. Activities will begin at o'clock Thursday morning with a girls' dodge ball contest. At 11 o'clock a boys' volleyball game will be held. At 1 p. m, _a Jrack meetjfor boys will begin and- at o'clock a track meet for girls will start. While the track meets are underway, start- ing at o'clock, various novelty races, such as a three-legged race, kangaroo hop, elephant walk, po- (Flease turn to Pace 2) -GUEST PREACHER Dr. Harvey D. Hoover preached a1 two services at Calvary church, Bal timore, Sunday in the absence o the pastor, the Rev. J. T, .Bowers Dr. Hoover will' also preach at Baltimore church next Sunday. SEVEN DRIVERS ARE GIVEN FINES Payment of fines and costs on var- ious charges by a number of mo- torists were announced by the state PATS SECOND FINE George Worchester, no address, arrested Friday night on a disorderly conduct charge, was fined and costs Saturday night by Justice of the Peace Robert P. Snyder. It was His second arrest for this offense. He paid a fine of and costs Thurs- day. Borough charges. police filed both Campfire Program Sunday Draws 200 More than 200 attended the camp- fire program arranged by the Na- tional Park Service Sunday night on East Cemetery hill, at which slides of Ft. McHenry, Baltimore, were shown. The building of the fort, its part in the defense of Baltimore against the British in 1814. its Civil War days, and subsequent history, and the story of Francis Scott Key and the writing of the "Star Spangled Banner." were told by Harold Less- em, historian of the Ft. McHenry national monument and historic shrine. The final campfire program of the season wfll take place next week. Motion pictures in color and sound of the West Coast and the Hawaiian Islands entitied "Highways to Ha- waii." win be shown, through the courtesy of United Airlines. Brothers Pay On 3 Code Charges Frank Breckenridge, 225 -West High street, arrested Saturday night by borough police on a charge of driving a car without an operator's license, was fined and costs by MARTIN'S TIM WINS Martin's Tim, owned toy George R. Martin, West High street, was a Sunday in American Kennel Club license trials at Dubois, Fsu according to a telegram received by the dog's owner today. Tan" is be- ing taken on a tour of field trials across the state. Weather Forecast Fair and slightly wanner tonight and Tuesday. Local Weather Saturday's high---------------- Saturday night's tow---------- Sunday's high----------------- Sunday night's tow Today at 1--.30 p. m. Week-end rains------ police today. Chester L. Martz, Waynesboro, paid and costs on a charge of not having a current inspection sticker before Justice of the Peace Ellis Stine, Fairfield. Loca J. Caldwell, Gettysburg R. 1, paid a fine of and the costs on a no inspection sticker charge before Justice H. L. Harbaugh, Fair- field. Robert Hartdagen, McKnights- town, also paid and costs on a no inspection sticker charge before Justice Harbaugh. A. M. Nace, Hanover R. 3, paid and costs before Justice J. B. Bellinger, Hanover, for making a left turn in the face of oncoming traffic, and Mrs. Paul J. Leonard, Harris- burg, paid a fine and costs be- fore Justice Elton Myers, Idaville, on a stop sign violation. Roy Decker, York Springs R. 2, paid a fine of and costs before Justice of the Peace George Brant, Dillsburg R. D., on a charge of fail- ing to yield one-half of the high- way. Henry Sharp Mumma, Leidig, Fulton county, paid and costs before Justice R. P. Sonyder on an overweight truck charge. STUDENT WEDS IN WASHINGTON Miss Varina Claire Richard daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vernon I. Richard, of Washington, D. C became the bride of Walter Harban Snipe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Snipe, also of Washington, in Saints Church there Saturday. Th Rev. George F. LeMoine and the Rev F. E. Warren officiated at the o'clock ceremony. Given in marriage by her father the bride wore a gown of marquisette and Alencon lace. He veil of illusion was held by a Flem ish cap of Alencon lace and sh carried a bouquet of white orchids roses and lilies of the valley. Miss Barbara Rosson was the mai of honor and Mrs. John Kelso Shipe was matron of honor. The brides- maids were Miss Jeanne M. Schnnnpf, Miss Jean E. Gross, Mrs. Robert E. Bondy, Jr., and Miss Hor- tense Fitzgerald. Miss Patricia Cockey was the flower girl. John Kelso Shipe served his bro- ther as best man and the ushers were Robert S. Schaeffer, Edmund L. Henshaw, Donald K. Duvall, John T. E. Van Dausen, Paul Geier and John Morgan. Following a garden reception at the home of the bride's parents, the couple left for a wedding trip to the Adirondacks. The bride attended Westhampton college and George Washington uni- versity and her husband is attend- ing Gettysburg college where he is a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. Freed Thomas Headen deputy chief of the U.S. Mili- tary Government's Information Control division in Berlin, wbo was arrested in Potsdamer Platz by Soviet Military police, is shown as a U.S. Army captain in 1943. His release was announced today. Car Damaged When It Hits Barricade An automobile operated by Rob- ert Walker. Mummasburg, suffered a damaged right rear fender early morning when it ran into a SPRAINS WRIST Melvin Eisenhart, 26. East Berlin, received treatment at the Warner hospital for a sprained left wrist received while digging a ditch at his home Saturday evening. MISS BENNER, E, H, CARBAUGH WED ON SUNDAY Miss Treva Ruth Benner, daugh- ter of Mrs. Sarah J. Benner, 114 East Middle street, and the late Charles H. Benner, and Edward Harold Carbaugb, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold B. Carbaugh, 71 Stein- wehr avenue, were united in mar- riage Sunday afternoon at o'clock in the St. James Lutheran church. The double ring ceremony was performed by the Rev. Ralph R. Gresh to the presence of the imme- diate families and a large number of relatives and friends. Preceding tHe ceremony a 15- minute organ recital was presented by Prof. Richard B. Shade, church organist. Donald Bellinger sang "At Dawning" and "Because." The tra- ditional wedding marches were played for- the processional and re- cessional. The church was decorated with palms, gladioli and asters, Attended By Sister The bride's gown had a fitted bo- dice of white satin, with long pointed sleeves, and a high neck-line yoke of silk marquisette trimmed with a shoulder-line lace ruffle. The full skirt of silk marquisette, over net taffeta, ended in a long train. A lace-edged, finger-tip veil, trimmed with orange blossoms, adorned 'the head of the bride. She carried a colonial bouquet of white gladioli and chrysanthemums with white satin streamers, centered with a re- movable corsage of yellow rosebuds. Her only jewelry was a string of pearls, a gift of the bridegroom. The maid of honor, Miss Freda J. Benner, a sister, of the bride, was her only attendant. She wore a gown of dusty rose taffeta with matching mitts. She carried a colonial bouquet of rose gladioli and blue delphiniums trimmed with blue satin streamers, and wore matching flowers in her hair. The bride's mother wore a brown print dress with brown accessories, and a corsage of white chrysanthe- mums and yellow rosebuds. The bridegroom's mother wore a black Please Torn To Page 2 CRASH SENDS NEWLYWEDS TO HOSPITAL HERE A wedding party Saturday after- noon ended with an automobile ac- cident two-tenths of a mile west of Fairfield which sent six persons to the Warner hospital In the local ambulance. Florence Mae Berstler, 19, of Phil- adelphia, and Charles Thompson, 35, also of Philadelphia, were married Saturday morning at Hagerstown. Saturday afternoon the bride and groom and their wedding party were en route home on the road from Zora to Fairfield when, according to police, the Thompson car smashed head-on into a car being driven toward Zora by Richard White, 19, Fairfield R. 1. Damage to the two cars was estimated at Learning- To Drive Mrs. Thompson, who was operat- ing on a three-day-old learner's permit, was driving her car. She suf- fered a fractured jaw, severe lacera- tions of the throat and bruises. Charles Thompson was found to have a fractured left foot, lacera- tions of the face and scalp when brought to the hospital. Roy Kline, 20, Philadelphia, had a cerebral con- cussion and multiple lacerations of the face. Gail Brown, 17, of Phila- delphia, had a puncture wound of the left leg and minor bruises of the body. Edward Graff, 33, Phila- delphia, suffered a sprained left leg, lacerations of the mouth and several loosened teeth. All were occupants of the Thompson car. Richard White escaped with a cerebral concussion, a severe lacera- tion of the scalp and a puncture wound of the right knee. State police were continuing their investigation of the mishap which occurred on a slight curve. Pf c. Strang's Body Is Being Returned The body of Pfc. Harry Elwood Strang, South Mountain, who was killed in Italy May Is among the Americans who lost then- lives during World War II being returned to the U. S. from Italy aboard the U. S. Army transport Carroll Victory, the Department of the Army announced today. The remains of 155 Pennsylvanians were aboard the ship. A son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Strang, Fayetteville, was Included. Private Strang was in- ducted into the Army through the Gettysburg board in 1942. He was employed at the Pennsylvania State Sanatorium at South Mountain be- fore being inducted into the Army. Knoxlyn Reports Hail On Sunday While some sections of Adams county were hit by wind, rain and hailstorms over the week-end, Get- tysburg came off with little more than a half-inch of rain through showers on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. The Knoxlyn section reported gardens-and cornfields damaged by hail while limbs were torn from trees by strong winds that accompanied the rain and hail. Northern and western sections of the county experienced heavy rains with the week-end total at the Arendtsville weather station exceed- ing two inches. DR.WENTZAT AMSTERDAM FOR CHURCH SESSION Dr. Abdel Ross Wentz, president of the Gettysburg Lutheran Theolo- gical seminary, is one of four dele- gates from the United States at- tending the first assembly of the World Council of Churches, which opened Sunday in Amsterdam, Hol- land. Dr. Wentz is a member of the World Council's provisional com- mittee, and was elected vice presi- dent of the Lutheran World Fed- eration at its initial meeting in Lund, Sweden. Dr. Wentz was accompanied to Amsterdam by his son, the Rev. Frederick K. Wentz, who resigned his pastorate at Culver City, Calif., and ,is attending the Amsterdam conference as an accredited visitor. Dr. Gotwald There Also Dr. Wentz and his son sailed from New York city late in July, going first to The Hague. On August 2 Dr. Wentz went to Geneva to work in the offices of the Lutheran World Federation and the World Council of Churches. Later he went to Ut- recht for a meeting of the execu- tive committee of the Lutheran World Federation and went from there to Amsterdam. After the conference he will de- liver a series of lectures in Hann- over, Germany, and will attend a conference at Flensburg. His son will visit France and Italy. They expect to return September 14. Dr. Luther AT Gotwald, a grad- uate of the seminary here, is also attending the conference. LEWIS METZ IS FIRST ON TRIAL IN COURT TERM Mete was found guilty by the jury which reported at pjn, The case of Ijewls Metz, Orrtanna R. 1, on trial in county court here today on a charge of pointing a firearm, was scheduled to reach tho jury this afternoon. It was begun this morning. Testimony was com- pleted at noon and the Jury charged beginning at o'clock. Metz is alleged to have fired two shots at the home of Clyde Sloat, Orrtanna R. 1 on July 9. State policeman George Acfcerson testi- fied that one blast from a shotgun went through the front door and lodged in another door, and a second shot smashed a radio in the kitchen of the Sloat home. Metz said he went to the Sloat home to get his housekeeper, whom he believed was visiting there. He said he took the shotgun with him because, he said, Sloat had threat- ened to "blow my head off" if he went there again. "Wanted To Get Even" Metz said he had been drinking, and admitted the shots and said he wanted to "get even" with Sloat. The housekeeper only as "Pauline." was identified The defendant said the housekeeper was "always coming home and breaking my door and window." Prior to the start of the case Metz pleaded guilty to a charge of surety of the peace. Among those who testified at the trial. In addition to Ackerson, were Ernest Wilkinson, a lodger at the Sloat home, Mr. and Mrs. Sloat, and Mrs. Sloat's mother, Mrs. Fannie Shindledecker. Persons in the kitchen at the time of the shooting escaped injury by taking refuge behind a door and the stove. Attorney Edward B. Bulleit was appointed by the cumt to .represent- the defendant when Metz appeared without an attorney. The jury in- cluded Harry Walters, McSherrys- town; Mrs. Gertrude Winebrenner, Baltimore street; Charles Spon- New Oxford R. D.; Charles E. Raffensperger, Biglerville; Mrs. Ambrose Myers, Gettysburg R. D.; C. J. Wilson. Gettysburg; Roy Chap- man, Orrtanna R. D.; Guy Beamer. Aspers; Frank J. Eberbart, Gettys- burg R. D.; Francis X. Stevens, Gettysburg R. D.; Guy J. Smith, New Oxford R. D. and Herbert W. Miller, Biglerville R. D. BULLETINS WINDISCH-EYLER NUPTIALS READ The marriage of Miss Geraldine M. Eyler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Darwin Eyler, Biglerville, to Edward J. Windisch, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Windisch. Baltimore, took place Saturday evening at 6 o'clock on the lawn at the home of the bride's brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ebbert, Biglerville. The double ring ceremony was performed by the Rev. Edmund Welker, pastor of the bride. Bou- quets of mixed flowers were used in decorating the lawn. Preceding the ceremony Daniel Ebbert sang "I Love You Truly" and accompanied by Miss Barbara Klein- felter. During the ceremony the Bridal Chorus from. Lohengrin was played by Miss Kleinfelter. The bride, who was given in mar- riage by her father, wore a light blue suit with white accessories and a corsage of white rosebuds. Miss Dorothy Smith, Biglerville, the maid of honor, wore a light grey suit and a corsage of pink rosebuds. Charles Sauers. Baltimore, was the best man. On Wedding Trip The bride's mother wore a blue dress and a corsage of pink and white rosebuds. The bridegroom's foster mother wore a black dress and a corsage of pink and white rose- Note Of Regret Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Aug. 23 The World Council of Churches opened its first business session today on a note of regret at the absence of any official repre- sentatives from Communions of the Roman Catholic, the Russian Ortho- dox, the Southern (United States) Baptist, and the Missouri synod of the Lutheran church. The absence of these Communions was explained by Dr. W. A, Visser T Hooft, general secretary of the World Council. Invitations had stated that if official participation were not desired, unofficial ob- servers would be welcomed from the Communions. The Russian church's decision to decline was made at a conference of the eastern Orthodox Church in Moscow in July, Dr. T Hooft ex- plained. It was said at the confer- ence that unofficial observers af- filiated with the Russian church outside of the Soviet Union, were present. New York, Aug. 23 Babe Justice of the Peace barricade at North Washington and here. A second charge, of disorderly j conduct, was also filed against him, and he was released in bail for a hearing this morning. He pleaded guilty and was fined another and costs. His brother. George Breckenridge, Hanover R. 3. was arrested on a charge of permitting an unlicensed operator to drive his car, and paid a fine of and costs Saturday night. Both are Negroes. Stevens streets, borough police re- ported. Police said they did not know who placed the barricade. The investi- gating officer reported he moved it oat of the way. Another motorist reported almost hitting it. 80 60 78 65 77 0.62 FRUIT PICKER RELEASED Pat Arnold, 63, a transient fruit picker, arrested Saturday night on a disorderly conduct charge, was released Sunday morning from jail on the assurance of his emptoycrs that a fine of and costs would be paid. Borough police made the arrest. PATS STOP SIGN FINE Richard Laverne Kindsvatter. Hagerstown. paid a fine of and costs before Justice of the Peace Ellis Stine, FairflekL on a stop sign violation placed by state police. LIONS TO MEET Gettysburg Lions will meet this evening at o'clock at Sheffer's park for their weekly dinner meet- ing. A directors' meeting wfll follow the regular dab session. Rath set aside part of bis estate to be used for "the interests of the kids of his win showed today. The wiO provided for the home ran kind's widow and daughters and left 19 per cent of the remainder for -the kids." It was filed in sur- rogate's court for probate today. Athens. Aug. 23 OT) The Greek army turning north and east from the Grammes mountains, today rooted guerrillas wbo were moving toward the Vttsi area "with the ap- parent aim of finding a new home for Comnmnist "Free Greece." A commnnioue said the rebels en- tered Greece from Albania directly west of Kastoria. Government troops bhmted their advance and sent them scurrying toward the southeast. spokesman said this stopped their march toward VttsL Stockholm, Sweden, Amj. W TJhe Jews asserted today two ed Israeli soldiers were "killed and their bodies mutilated" while prison-j ers of Arabs in Jerusalem's Inter- national Red Cross zone. A third; Israeli prisoner, the Jews declared, or was killed." Mosfae Shertok, Israeli foreign minister, protested the incidents to Count Fdke Berna- dotte. Washington, Aug. 23 Con- gressional spy invesOsators said to- day Elizabeth T. Benlley fa ready to ten how a Soviet spy ring went after America's wartime industrial se- crets. One member of the House on-American activities committee said he fears the Russians may have been highly successfuL Following the ceremony a recep- tion was held on the lawn at the Ebbert home. A three-tier wedding cake featured the bride's table. Ap- proximately 125 persons were pres- ent. Following the reception the couple left on a wedding trip through Ohio. Upon their return the couple will reside at their home near Taney- town. Mrs. Windisch was formerly em- ployed as a telephone operator at the BiglerviDe exchange. Mr. Wind- isch is employed as an electric weM- er in the Baltimore shipyards. Youth Smashes Car; Passenger Is Cut Filmore H. Arnold. 19. Dillsburg R. 1. according to state police made a "flying trip" three miles south of Dillsburg along the Gettysburg road Sunday night at 11 o'clock which resulted in the destruction of his car. the breaking off of a utility pole, and slight injuries to Homer Vandevender, Dillsburg R. 2, a pas- senger in Arnold's car. According to police. Arnold's ve- hicle ran off the side of the road, struck a utility pole, knocked down the pole and dragged it 50 feet after tearing it loose from its wires, crossed a gully eight feet deep and 12 feet wide apparently by GUILTY PLEAS SHORTEN TRIAL LIST IN COURT Seven pleas of guilty and the ill- ness of another defendant this morning reduced to 15 the number of cases that will be heard by the current jury panel. District Attor- ney Daniel E. Teeter said today. Fleas, announced by the district attorney, were made by Ralph W. Starkey, Gettysburg R. 4, charged with drunken driving; J. Gerald Spangler, Dover R. 2, drunken driv- ing; James F. Pennington, Keyser, W. drunken driving; John W., George Harold and Richard E. Rock, all of Chambersburg, and all charged with aggravated assault and battery; and Stanley Boltz; Gard- ners R. 2, charged with driving after his license was suspended. Twenty-three cases were original- ly scheduled for court this week. With the seven pleas, the reported illness of Joseph W. SouthaU, Car- lisle Barracks, who was to be tried on a drunken driving charge, and with the two cases against Lewis Metz, Orrtanna R. D_ heard this morning, the number of cases re- maining on the docket is 13. Sooth- all, it was stated today, is now at the Valley Forge Military hospital A number of those who were to appear for jury duty have been ex- cused. Clerk of Courts Mrs. Emma Sheffer reported this morning. Those excused from serving daring the August term were Mrs. Alan Allamong. Fairfield R. Viola EL Green. Gettysburg R. D.: Mrs. straight across, since no tracks ted Evelyn Knox. Gettysburg R. into the gully, and finally Anna McCann. Hanover: iCss AT tJSWV John A. Zimmerman, commander of the Sgt. William M. sfeffy camp. No. 126. United Spanish War Vet- erans, is to Washington, D. C, at- tending ttie national convention of the USWV, which opened Sunday and will conclude Thursday. He is Uw delegate from the local camp. after smashing into a tree. Vandevender has a laceration of the left Up and chin. He was treat- ed by Dr. John Miller at Dillsburg. Arnold was unhurt. Damage to- talled and police are continuing their investigation. CHARGE IS WITHDRAWN Richardson. Jr., Carlisle arrested Friday night by Sheriff Dorsey J. Schultz and State Earl street. Maude WhiteJeather. Gettysburg and Miss Ruth A. Zeigler, East Ber- lin. Excused from service for today were George P. Black. Gettysburg, and George Steinberger. Fairfield. LEVTZ REUNION Sixty-nine persons attended the Lentz family reunion held Sunday at the St. Ignatius church grounds. Buchanan Valley. The following officers were ejected: President. Mrs. Report Theft At Bus Terminal Between and was re- ported stolen at the Greyhound Policeman James Walsh on an as- i Irwin Wood. Gettysburg: secretary, post house last Friday night, it was sault and battery charge filed Howard Kfane. Gettysburg R. learned today. The money was taken his sister, Catherine, was discharged from a cabinet, according to tile by Justice of the Peace John H. post house manager. A report was i Basehore Saturday night when the and treasurers. Kane. Biglerville. The game committee was composed at Mrs. Harry SoDenberg- made to borough police, the manager said. No further details were given. Hastes. Edwmrt sister withdrew the charge. Richard-1 er. Jr., and Mrs. Albert Stenger. son had been in jail pending a hear- i both of Cbambersburg. Next year tog Saturday night. He was assessed j the mmkm will be held at Caledonia the costs of the action. park to June. .NFWSPAPFRf   

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  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

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