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Gettysburg Times Newspaper Archive: May 5, 1948 - Page 1

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   Gettysburg Times (Newspaper) - May 5, 1948, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania                                Weather Forecast Clearing and cooler tonight. Thursday morning probably followed by showers Thursday night. THE GETTYSBURG TIMES Truth Our Public Good Our Aim ESTABLISHED 1902 With Honor To Ourselves And Profit To Our Good Evening All men are born free and equal but most cf them get married. Vol. 46, No. 108 Read by Nearly Everybody In Adams County GETTYSBURG, PA., WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 5, 1948 Leased Wire Member of The Associated Press PRICE THREE CENTS David Liiienthal, Atomic Energy Commission Head, GHS Graduation Speaker David Lilienthal, chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, will be the Gettysburg high school gradu- ation speaker, it was disclosed today by Principal G. W. Lefever. The Atomic Energy Commission head will deliver the commencement address from the stage of the Ma- jest'c theater Tuesday evening, June 1, on a national radio hookup. The Lilienthal address and its ra- dio broadca.se have been arranged by Paul E. Elicker, executive secre- tary of the National Association of Secondary School Principals ancTan acquaintance of Prof. Lefever who is a former president of the Pennsyl- vania branch of the national or- ganization. "Youth in the Atomic Age" National publicity is being given the Gettysburg broadcast which, will be heard, on the American Forum of the Air program, from to 10 o'clock on the Mutual network. The program will be known as The "Na- tional High School graduation" pro- gram and literature being sent by the National Association of Second- ary School Principals to high, schools throughout the nation will urge them to "listen in." Lilienthal's subject will be "Youth in the Atomic Age." Two members of the graduating class of approximately 125, one boy and one girl will have brief parts in tht ladio broadcast as will the Get- tysburg high school choir. Record- ings will be made of the Lilienthal Please Turn to Page 2 Y SERGEANT BADLY BURNED IN GAS BLAST At two o'clock this afternoon hospital authorities held little hope for. the recovery of Ser- geant Petee. DAVID E. LILIENTHAL Search Continued In Baby's Death Detective R. O. Parsons of the Pennsylvania State Police, who was here last Saturday to assist borough police in their attempts to unravel the mystery of the decapitated baby, returned to Gettysburg today, and checked further clues with Chief of Police Robert C. Harpster. "Everything is being done that possibly can be Chief Harp- ster said. Detective Parsons con- curred in this statement. Harpster said there had been no letup in the intensive investigation being con- ducted, and renewed his appeal to citizens who may have any informa- tion of possible leads to contact the police. The baby's head was found April body. has yet PURCHASES 66 ACRES NEAR "PEACE LIGHF Littlestown School Auditorium Filled To Overflowing For Last Session Times Cooking School Littlestown's first annual Gettysburg Times cooking school which closed Tuesday night met all far surpassed them. The enthusiasm of the women who came, saw and learned new things about cooking knew no bounds. A total of women filled the auditorium of St. Aloysius school on the two nights of the cooking school, Monday and Tuesday. The attendance opening: night was 714. Eight hundred and forty-two women jammed the large auditorium Tuesday night. Every chair was occupied. Women perched on tables at the rear of the hall. One woman used an upturned waste paper basket for a chair. Dozens who arrived late and were {unable to find chairs remained throughout the session, stand-1 0 tne ing along wall. Largest Gathering Of Women Preparations had been made for a large crowd, but ths number of Littlestown and vicinity women who attended the closing1 session exceeded all estimates. Additional chairs were brought in, but still the crowd could not all be seated. It was the largest gathering of women ever assembled in Littlestown. It was a tribute not only to a community service rendered by The Gettysburg Times, but to Mrs. Nancy Rowe, whose homemaking lectures and personality won her hun- dreds of new friends. Participates In Ursinus Pageant Miss Betty Leeming, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Arthur Leeming. Lit- tlestown, R. 1, will participate in the annual May Day festivities at Ursinus college, Collegeville. on May 8. Miss Leeming will take part in group dancing in the original pag- eant, "Spring written by an Ursmus student. A sophomore history-sociology major, Miss Leeming us an associate j editor of the college newspaper. The j Ursinus Weekly, vice president of J the campus branch of the YW.CA I and a member of Kappa Delta Kap-1 pa sorority. She is a graduate of Gettysburg high school, class of I 1946. Ohio Truck Driver Killed, Countian Is Badly Hurt In Freak Crash Tuesday Night CHILD WELFARE UNIT CONDUCTS ANNUAL DINNER The knowledge that he or she is j unwanted may sometimes do more j damage to a child psychologically i than the bombs of enemy planes or j engendered in advancing Sixty-six and one-half acres of land have been purchased by the National Park Service, U. S. De- partment of the Interior, to be added to the government-owned area of the Gettysburg Battlefield, it was announced today by Dr. J. Walter Coleman; local superintendent. The Government purchased 66 acres of land from Mr. and Mrs. Ray M. Hoffman and Mr. and Mrs. Leroy H. Winebrenner, for Light Peace Lawrence E. Eckert, for The Hoffman-Winebrenner prop- ry is the former Gettysburg Air- the_ delphia, executive secretary of the Children's Aid Society of Pennsyl- j Memoria vania, indicated Tuesday evening in Joms a talk given at the YWCA. Townsend was the speaker at a banquet meeting of members of the Staff Sergeant Robert Petee, 20. Monroe. Michigan, is in a critical condition in the Annie M. Warner hospital suffering, from third degree burns from head to foot received in an explosion of a gas radiator in one of the tourist cabins at Green Gables, Steinwehr avenue, at this morning. Curnal Butt, owner of the tourist court, said that Sgt. Petee ran from the cabin immediately after the ex- plosion without any clothes. The full force of the blast blew the door and doorframe a distance of 40 feet, while the cabin was bulged outward with most damage on the south side. A mattress was ablaze and extinguished by the Gettysburg Fire department. Lighted Gas Radiator Advisory Committee of the Adams County Child Welfare Services and foster parents of some of the 90 children under care of the child wel- fare unit in the.county- Cites .Experiences Townsend drew no conclusions but reported on two recent adoption cases carried through by the Chil- dren's Aid Society. In one case a Polish child was brought here. The youngster had been displaced, had (Continued on page 7) POLICE BLAME SPEEDING FDR MOST MISHAPS The lack of common courtesy on the highways and the taking of or- dinary safety precautions was at- Mrai tributed by state police of the Get- Sgt Petee. apparently, turned on'tysburg sub-station for the 15 acci- a gas radiator this morning to heat dents investigated during April. the cabin. He returned to bed and while there lighted a cigarette. Gas fumes were ignited causing the blast. Petee told Mr. Butt before retiring Tuesday evening, that he intended to get up early this morning and tour the battlefield. It is be- lieved that he hadn't left the cabin this morning. Sgt. Petee was Principal causes of these accidents, according to Sgt. W. Kurt Duhrkoff. were driving too fast for road con- ditions, failing to yield half the highway and similar offenses. Accidents, however, were fewer during the past month than in March or in April a year ago. accord- ing to Sergeant Duhrkoff. The total _ _ conscious and co-' investigated by the state police was herent immediately after the explo-l15. compared with 24 hi March and sion. He asked Mr. Butt to get in 122 in April. 1347. One motorist met touch with the commanding officer J death In a highway accident last at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, where month, but in March there were two he was to report today. fatalities, and in April a year ago Fire Chief James A. Aumen esti- mated the fire damage at S500. Dr. C. G. Crist, accompanied the ambulance, and reported that Sgt. Petee was critically burned. Appropriations The money for the purchase of the land comes from a federal appropriation for the Interior De- partment for the fiscal year ending June 30. The money was appropri- ated to purchase parcels of land for National Parks wherever the De- partment deemed it essential and could be secured to the best ad- vantage of the Department. The deeds to the properties have been sent to the Director of the National Park Service for approval and will then be sent to the At- torney General for final approval. Doctor Coleman said the land, when acquired, will be leased by the government to local farmers for agricultural and orchard purposes. This was also planned in the auth- orization bill. The purpose is to maintain the land so that it "will look as nearly as possible the way it looked in July 1863 when the three days' Battle of Gettysburg was fought. New York Company Seeks Factory Site The Chamber of Commerce has received an inquiry from a New- York city firm requesting informa- tion on available factory sites here. "We have been requested by a client, a very prominent garment manufacturer, to locate industrial space for him in your said a letter received from S. J. Cale- pin Associates. "We will require approximately 15.000 square feet of floor space and an approximate labor pool of 150 females." COUNTY NATIVE DIES SUDDENLY three were killed. Week-ends Most Hazardous Twenty-one persons were injured in April. 1948: 25 in March, and 17 in April. 1947. The total estimated damage to property last month was far below the figures for the other two months. compared with for March and for April. 1947. Week-ends continued to provide (Please Turn to Page 8) "The reception you have accorded j The Gettysburg Times cooking school has seen reassuring to all of us on The Times Carl Baum, manager of the newspaper said, at the conclusion of Mrs. Rowe's lee- ture. "We are definitely and sin- cerely interested in Littlestown. and for the past two years have been putting forth our best efforts to be j of service to this community. The starting of a cooking school of Mrs. Rowe s standard is no small under- 19 ARRESTS BY BOROUGH COPS DURING APRIL BISHOP LiUE OF GERMANY AT SEMINARY WEEK Two YMCA Groups Coming To 'Field A group of nine boys and two adults from the Syracuse, N. Y., YMCA will visit Gettysburg on May 30 and 31, and tour the battlefleid here, according to a letter received by the Chamber of Commerce. The group will reach Gettysburg Sunday evening, traveling by station wagon, on the return tnp to Syra- cuse from Washington, anrl__will spend the night here. They will tour the battlefield the next day. The Union Tour and Travel Bu- reau wrote that a group of 50 boys, aged nine to 16, from the downtown YMCA, Pittsburgh, will tour the battlefield on June 18. taking. It involves a lot of hard work and considerable expense not to mention the complete co-operation of leading merchants and manufac- turers and of the women of the community themselves." Award Many Prizes The Littlestown school closed in a juvenile. j There were 19 arrests made by Gettysburg borough police during April, the report of Chief of Police j j Robert C. Harpster presented Mon- j I day night to borough council dis- closed. Ten of the arrests were on motor -violations, eight were for dis- j orderly conduct and one was for a felony, with the case involving a There were nine auto accidents in- volvmg 14 can, and causing damage shower of gifts. 72 of groceries, food prepared by Mrs. Rowe, canned goods, food prepara- i totaling. Stolen property valued tions, coffee, etc., and the special awards donated by merchants and mauf given out. Those who received the food Bas- kets were: Mrs. Dennis Prince street; Opal Mays, Frederick street extended; Mrs. H. M. Badders, 41 Lumber street! Miss Kathryn Bortner, Littlestown B. 1; Mrs. C. W. Earner, 204 East King street; Mrs. Arthur Boyd, Littlestown; Mrs. Emma M. "Wilson, 106 East King street; Mrs. R- J. Eckenrode, 211 West King street; Mrs. John Staub, Littlestown R. 1, and Mrs. E. R. Bigelon, 17 East King street. Two large boxes of cookies went to (Continued on Page 7) COUNTY P.O.S.A, WILL INITIATE NEW MEMBERS Plans for the initiation of a class of 150 new members are being made by the Patriotic Order Sons of Amer- ica in Adams county. The initiation will be held at Littlestown May 21 with state and national officers in Dr. Gordon Kevin Rebert, erick. well-known educator and prominent in Maryland teaching circles, died suddenly in Baltimore Monday afternoon at o'clock- He had been suffering for some time with a heart condition and Marked 'Settled'! union townships. fQUR-SfltlfHERir COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICTS JOIN Four southern county school dis- tricts entered into a jointure Tues- day evening at Littlestown high school. The districts making up the newly formed joint board are Lit- tlestown. Mt. Joy. Germany and! attendance. The class is to honor George D. Sheely., New Oxford, active in POS of A circles here for many years and a former district president. The drive for new members is underway in the county under the direction of National Secretary Rus- sell L. Sandt. Tannersrule. Pa. State President Coming at S345 was recovered by the police during the month and returned to the owners. One hundred and seventeen minor complaints were received by police and one homicide investigation was begun during the month. In his re- port the Chief of Police promised "to do everything that is possible to bring the person or persons re- sponsible for the crime to justice." The case is that concerning the murder of a week-old infant whose severed head was found in the bor- ough disposal plant. Treasurer's Report The report of the borough treas- urer, presented at Monday's council session showed the balance at the beginning of May as Ex- penditures during, the month totaled j with the largest expendi- i ture being for tile. The outlay for j April was divided into: highway, j 71813: safety, finance, sewer, health, I and "utility, The ex- penditures .of the borough up to the beginning of this month totaled Income of the year so far totals including turned in during April. Income for the month included from meter collections in- (Please Turn to Page 8) BISHOP LILJE Rt. Rev. Bishop Harms Lilje, de- scribed as one of Germany's most outstanding spiritual leaders and a militant anti-Nazi during World War II, will deliver a series of three lectures during Seminary Week at the Gettysburg Lutheran Theologi- cal seminary. He win lecture Thursday at 10 a. m. 'on "The Dilemma of Man." At the same hour Friday morning he will speak on Church Speaking Today" and his final lecture will be at 2 p. m. Friday on "The New Humanism." Dr. Lilje, who was elected bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran church of Hannover a year ago, was im- prisoned several times because of his opposition to the Hitler regime. A native of Hannover, Bishop Lilje visited student centers on three con- tinents, including North America, as general secretary of the German Christian Students' World Union. From 1937 to 1946, Bishop Lilje (Continued on page 8) LEAGUE DIVORCEE HELD FOR THEFTS AT GIRLS' SCHOOLS A 33-year-old ash blonde divorcee arrested at Easton, near Chester- town, Md., Tuesday night for the larceny of money and jewelry from a girls' dormitory at Washington college, is believed to be the same coed" who stole approxi- mately in cash from two rooms in Stevens hall on the Gettysburg college campus April 28, and looted girls' rooms at Hood college, Fred- erick, Md., Dickinson college, Car- lisle and Wilson college and Perm Hall, Chambersburg. The woman arrested at Easton was driving a 1940 Lincoln Zephyr, and fitted the description given to boroiigh police here The one who visited both Stevens and Huber halls here was driving a similar car with California plates, police said. Chief of Police Robert C. Harpster was notified of the Maryland arrest to- day. A detainer will be filed in that state by local police, Harpster said. Maryland authorities gave the (Continued on page 6) Liftlestown new members of the Gettysburg. New Oxford and Littlestown camps of tht order will be State President Frank Doemnan of Reading. State Secretary Charles B. Helms of Phila- delphia and National Secretary Sandt. The degree team from Camp No. 401 of Craley. York county, will do the ceremonial work. Two automobile accident damage suits involving Adams countians were marked settled, and discontin- would have been 59 years of age on ued today on the records of Pro- Friday. Dr. Rebert was born at Littles- town May 7. 1889. the son of the late Samuel Henry and Laura Belle Hesson Rcbert. He attended Mer- cersburc academy in 1905-OS: re- ceived his A.B. degree from Frank- lin and Marshall college in 1910. his A.M. from the University of Chi- cago in 1925 and the Ph.D. in 1929. He attended Eastern Theological seminary. 1910-13. and Johns Hop- kins. 1918-21. He was an instructor at Franklin j record shows the and Marshall academy. 1912-13: minister of the Reformed church at (OnUnaea page 2} >r 65 48 53 ._v39 thonotary Arthur H. Shields at the court house. One action was brought by R. Sell, McKnightstown, against E. W. AC. Hartman, Gettysburg, and N. E. Shultz. Caf-htown, as a result of an accident March 1, 1947. in Mc- H. Allen Walker, of the Mt. Joy board, was named president of the new joint district, with Luther S. Hess, Germany township, vice presi- dent: Henry E. Waltman. Littles- town, secretary, and James Strevag. Union township, treasurer. The same officers were named both for the Joint board and for the executive committee ol the joint board. Paul E. King, supervising principal of the Littlestown schools, was nam- ROWE M, MARTIN IS LIONS HEAD Rowe M. Martin was elected presi- menl were not disclosed. The other suit was that broucht by Ryland Garretson. Bendersvjlle, against. Harvey Beamer. who died since the instituted. The in this action divided between Mr. Garret- son and the Beamer estate. this for ClHunbTobarR Clowd I May 7th joint district. Adopt Resolaiiom The meeting opened with County Superintendent of Schools J. Floyd Slaybaugh presiding after whjch Luther M. Lady, president of the county board, was named temporary chairman and W. E. Mackley. Lit- llestown, was selected as temporary Resolutions adopted by four boards to enter into a (Continued on Page Two) ML JOY WOMEN WILL BE GUESTS The Mother and Daughter banquet of the Mt. Joy Lutheran church will be held Friday evening in the parish hall adjoining the church at o'clock. The men of the church will pre- pare and serve the meal. The toastmistress will be Mrs. Robert Lohr. The following prozram has been planned: Group singing: Scripture reading. "Mother's Love." Mrs. Roy Hann; toast to the mothers. Patty omrai. to Jw redtottoiB. -MWlKrt Lillic Girl." Sally Reed: "In This Audience." Betty Maring: "Recipe for Baby Mary Jane Schwartz: "Good- bye." Susie Reed. "A Little Boy's Ma." Milrirrd Schwartz; readings. "When Motlvr Slavs In Bed." Mrs Percell Eckcr; "Ask Your Mother." Mrs. Edwin Benntr. Pantomomc and Songs. "My Hours of Memory In Songs" vri'h Mrs. Glenn Black as the reacr-r Prizes. viJ be warded to the old- est m tth.-r yo- mother wilh .1 ;r3 1h" mother si 
  • in Ml. Joy township. where the laicest meteorite ever Please Torn to 2 'i-. 9 i i.-. I'.-jre. la 110-i-j. of two pieces of prop- f at Arendtsvllle for a new fruit laboratory and experimental or- 1 chards was voted Tuesday at a meeting of the board of directors of the South Mountain Fruit Research Laboratories, and authorization also given for a bond issue j to pay for the property and improve- ments. Properties purchased include a. large dwelling owned by Katie Sheely and a farm owned by Amos Sheely. Cost of both pieces of prop- erty, the attorney for the labora- tories said, was The meeting of the directors was held in the of- fices of the National Fruit Product company. Peach Glen. The directors authorized the lease of the property to The Pennsylvania. Slate College for a period of 20 years, beginning July 1. They also authorized an option to the state college for purchase of the land when rentals have paid for the cos; and improvements. Seria! 20-Tear Bonds The bond issue will be in three per cent serial bonds. TO be retired in 20 years. The bonds will be sold to fruit growers of Adams. Franklin, Cumberland and York counties Officials of the Research Laboratoner, board of directors present at the meeting included M. E Knouse. president: R, C Lotl. secretary, and Harvey B. Raffwvs- perger, treasurer. The directors (Continued on Page 2) For Amy by Battfaoft. Soimpruf. Marr BarrcMi AIM] Daaaot. Abba SjMCjaJtj
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