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Adams Sentinel: Monday, June 3, 1844 - Page 1

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   Adams Sentinel, The (Newspaper) - June 3, 1844, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania                                At S- UU per annum, in Or S'- if not paid within the year. S____ AM) I'JROl'lUKTOK. per square for 'i weeks, y'> rents per for each continuance. "KKSt.-T WITH CARE TllK bl'HUT OF INNOVATION tTON TllC OF Voni HOWKVKK Sl'KCUU'S TllK I'KHTKVl'S. POETRY. SPIRIT WATCHERS. Arc they mar us. Spirit From their holy homes on higa. In our lone solemn Do they over hover iiitzh the care? of life enfold us, And the spirit Spirit art ihou near 1'iaying lor thy str.iL'uhng irii.lids'' When the worn heart almost broken. FeeU amulsi 01 piut .ind It-tier ol tho-o which H'ler to Mr. Win TK s character, (piahtius liie expulsion ol' our entire conctineniv. i'in the (.'uiiiiittiniciitltlt. Loco press arc transform this pviitliMnun into a lniliv. We know John in- timately, and we can most conscientious- ly declare that in the characteristics of a well hrcd politeness, sim- nger exceeded the largest j vily, forbearance, feeling, seen and his broad round j ;uul genuine amiability, all the qualities face, when turned toward us. striped tliat make up the character we both res- I v II i 't 11 f r m i xvuu ms nerce eyes, togetl'.er willi i pea and love, be is unsurpassed ny any 111 i i ,c. !iai-' "i'ankee trick. The money was taken poor man bowed assent. Prese with a promise either to refund it. or play came a reinforcement of stock, then loads mortal lie is peculiarly d in Kenlttcky for coolnessof I d ier ami respecnutuess Hut, ith the nio.-4 cautious pace nnagititi- j like every true Kentuckitm, he would he a (jood trick, and morning was selected j of manure at the proper time. seed, and I hie the tiovr approached the alligator as the time for an exhibition of the Yan- wood from th kee's skill. Pleased with each other. ;ii the plantations for repairing buildinos. The Puke rode over i m ,1 i SO lie his raised fool remained some seconds he ren aced H on the o-roumi, and he proceeded till he ,o boJ ia i "IK n n. nnfl secmi'H nut e vc troin n Ontt o i l came, the j and seemed quite relieved from a load of j Things assumed a ment: and when morning Yankee rose up with the first light, j care by the change. o-ently dressed himself with the clothes j new aspect. The crops and his slreno-th and bouiulino- from the earth, alli- as prompt to resent affront as slow to of- fer it. Wo certainly regret, as he has himself publicly regretted, the late occurrence in Congress. Ij'.il what could the meekest earth do, when struck in the the conflict lasted, each seemed to exert i he descended immediately upon the alli-j face, but return the blow Had he not gator's back, and seized il by the throat, j repelled his assailant, while, as a Chris- tian, we should have applauded his meek forbearance, there is not a woman in the land who would not have whipped him Trimming proper sea- son for this operation has been a subject of much discussion. Formerly the fash- ion was rather general to trim in winter when the sap was said to he down in the alongside of the flat-boat, where sat the roots of the tree or at least as eatly as Yankee perfectly composed, in quiet pos- Xew Orleans. The strangers soon awoke, and upon jreltino: up to dress, beheld the sad reality of a Yankee trick. Having much money in their saddle-bags, they ascertained which way the Yankee had gone, and obtaining a small skiif set out after him the skiff was light, and mo- g rapidly, an hour or two bronchi The Duke on his next visit said, '-Well. John, I think the farm does very well now. We will change again you its utmost strenoth. The tioer, however, had the advantage, for he had grasped March before the buds bcca.n to But many good orchardisls now doubt the propriety of trimming at this season and Judge BucI, of Albany, is decidedly session of their clothes and saddle-bags. With much apparent pleasure he arose, inquired after their healths, and asked how they were pleased with the of the opinion with those foreigners who The idea they then had of the Yankee is left to the imaofination of the recommended for this business the season between the first and second growth of the tree, that is, sometime in the latter part of June or the (irstof July. generally aorced that no limbs should be cut However, he soon delivered their saddle- bags, which had not been opened, and exchanged clothes. The strangers, hav- ing deposited their saddle-bags in the skill, very much dissatisfied, were about. >ve u m uiiaiit'u im i l l 11 i L t the a lio-ator in a part ol the neck, wincn shall be tenant once more as you have now your head fairly above water, 1 hope i Irom tnrnmg las you will be enabled to keep it Illead round to se.xe his an- 4-_ _ _ _ tllTMiri-li 'il'ilf off, but that a little trimming of the small j to leave, when the Yankee insisted upon their taking a parting glass together; twigs annually, such as interfere with each other, may be taken off to good ad- vantage and will prove sufficient. It has been indeed contended that trees should never be trimmed; that nature gave them no more than she in- tended they should keep, and that by robbing the tree of its natural branches, we inflict on them an irreparable injury. This doctrine may lead us too If we must not curtail the works of na- ture, we must suffer our nails to crow and while drinking, he stepped back, jumped into the skiff and pushed Amid the exertions of the crew, he plied his paddle, and the skiff darted away from the flat boat. Going up stream, pr.rsuit with the flat boat was Me was observed to land on the Arkan- sas shore, where there is little doubt be speedily doubled the money thus obtained. Irish, weaver, just out. But the question is asked, why j imported from the sister isle, took to his given j employer in Ivilmarnock, the other day, may i the first cloth he had woven since his ar- thcn have trees limbs and leaves in excess 1 The true answer be, that nature intended there should be, in general, an abundance, so that the tree might be provided against casual- rival. Ilis employer detected in the cloth two small holes, within half an inch of each other, and told him he must pay ties. The insects must be provided a fine of a shilling for a hole. for, and would be in want of their por- tion of foliage, and if the inferior ani- mals did not take from it their customary supply, it was then the duty of man to act as regulator and to take from the tree O i as much as it sometimes loses in the I the same price natural course of events. "And plazc returned Pat, "is it by the number of holes or by the sixe of them that you put the fine upon us I" the number of holes, to lie sure." "And a bi-r hole and a small hole is Yes, a shilling for each hole, big or liitl Plowing in Green j '-Then crive me a houkl of the plants contain in their substances not on-: replied Paddy and getting the cloth in- ly all they have drawn up from the soil j to his hand, he lore the two small holes but also a great part of what they have.! ;nto onc< ;11K} "By the hill of drawn down from the air. Flow in these i Ilowth. and that saves me a shilling tiny living plants and you necessarily add to I the soil more than was taken from l other words, make il richer in oro-an-} ic matter. Repeat it. and you may car-, ry it to the highest point of productive-; ivss. By pursuing such a coimo. with inn The duke rode offal his usual rapid rale, j The man stood in astonishment but a happy fellow he was when, on applying to the steward, he found that he was ac- tually re-entered as tenant to the farm, just as it stood in its restored condition; J will venture lo say, however, that the duke himself was the happier man of the two. Fidelity of u Norfolk Herald slates that James Seguine, Esq. merchant at Deep Creek, having a call of business at Portsmouth on Tuesday, :hich required his absence till the next day, ordered his trusty man-servant Charles, (an elderly negro) to occupy the room adjoining the store, during the night. Before breakfast, next morning, Charles was discovered busily at work currying his master's horse in the stable of the Crawford House, in Porlsmouth and being interrogated as to what brought him to town, laconically made answer that he "had shot onisl many severe w nigger id killed him, some time in the night, and had come down for massa to go borne and see about it." It appeared, upon fur- ther inquiry, that during the night, two stout negro follows broke into Mr. Se- guine's store to rob it but Charles be- ing wide awake, seized his master's dou- ble barrelled gun, and shot one of them dead with one of the charges, and pulled th e remaining trier upon t e se cond robber, but it missed lire, and he esca- ped. They were armed with knives and bludgeons, and would doubiedJy have murdered the faithful fel- low, if he had not been provided with the means of defence. Capital good nal'U'ed ha.- run around our village lat-'ly, Vom a story tha'. is too good'o confine you noi l borders. For several Edinhursr Courant says that an Irishman having accidentally broken a glass in a window of a house in Queen street, was making the best of his way lo g-'-t out of sight a, uell as out of mind but unfortunately for Pat. ihe proprietor stole a march on him. and having seized him by the collar, exclaimed -You broke my window, fellow, did i1' he blows were inflicted on the body of the tiger by its saw-like tail, the noble beast of the forest, when die battle was conclu- ded, shook his brawny sides, and seemed unconscious of any pain. Having over- come the alligator, he dragged it a little further on the shore, and sat over it ex- actly like a cat over a captive He then took the creature in his mouth, and gently walked off with it into the jungle. About ten minutes afterwards, we saw the tiger emerge from the. forest; and af- ter gazing at us for a few minutes, and perhaps imagining that we were almost too far from the shore lo allow him to add us to the number of his trophies of victory and blood, he slowly pursued his course in a different direction, and we with her o-.-irters. In eleven sessions of service, through the most exciting periods, White, though a most decided and linn man. has never had before the slightest col- lision with any one; but has made himself a great personal favorite with all ifcnlleiuen of both parlies. The misera- ble vipers of Kentucky cannot blur name. A recent letter from published in the York Post, mentions the immediate of the Inte of Mr. as Secretary of the Tiea.snrv. learn from a private source, on which xve have full reliance that ihe thus made is correct, and we therefore annex that portion of the letter, I'nr- iii.ihiiif( as it a lurlher development of ihe cxtiaoidinaiy pioccediiiics adopted hy the National I'l.veentm1. in connection u ilh the Tex- as annexation project. In carry ing out the preparations for the naval expedition againsi Mexico, ii be- came' necessary to procure the deposit of by way of secret aernier. ino- ne.tj, with a confidential agent at New York. As there could be discoverei saw him no more. In less than an hour i a ir 1111 act o Coii'M'i'SS trectmo- such a aliens ards the alhoalor, who had been i .stunned but not killed, crept out of the no jungle, and though evidently much inju- red, yet with .some difficulty reached the river, and escaped the power of his san- guinary foe. He, however, was loo much injured lo remain long in the water and soon came again to land, but look ihe precaution of exposing hut a part of his body, and keeping his bead towards the shore. lie continued but a very short time and again launched into the deep, repeating his visits to the beach almost every quarter of an hour whilst we re- mained. The sight was certainly dread- fully magniiicent, and one we believe which is very seldom witnessed. There appeared in the New York'j Courier anil Inquirer of Tuesday two very interesting communications, respec- ling the American Settlements on the Coast of Africa, written, it is .stated in an I'diiorial introduction, by an officer in the S. Navy, of great, intelligence and hiirh character, now attached lo our Squadron on the coast of Africa. The opinions fxpv.i.sed in papers tin; lion ol any part oi tin: public money, IVlr. Spencer, when requested by the. Presi- dent, declined giving the order, or to al- low it to be given, to his lie next, it is said, received a peremp- tory orilcr to transfer the money. Mr. Spencer, seeing the game was up, coolly wrote a second refusal, and with it sent in a note of resignation. I lo remain- O ed in the Department just twenty-four hours afterward, and having in that short space squared all the ends of his con- cern with off the dust of his feet against the place, in tin1 meantime, the probability is thai the has gone inlo the hands of the confidential agent of the Navy I and has been nfidentiully" applie But this is a small item in the funds which have been absorbed in the c.vpenililures of that de- partment, but of which there is no ac- count, and which have yet to be paid by for in England. i ,J bill has been introduced in the of Lords by Lord AUenhnni, ;ibol- d' ofan observer; and they "upn.-onmen, lor under any are the valuable 01I account. I circumstances. 1 n.s was loudly speech, and, as T I'M l'! jiio an.i unequivocal, lo the picM'til flourishing coti- i the prosp'-cls f lh  f-yi'lhiirsl, Urougham, Campe I hike of i'ichmond spoke in favor ass by an undoubted of their future, and importance i n i i fiJina-t unanimous are n ol a-, very ilalujruig ati'l the nee v, Inch they miisl ijvcn- acre, was 20 bushels; now failure of manuring and good cu is said to be not over 10 per acre The of never hear of the wandorinir Jew. per! or poorly aimed, have been not efH-ctual. in- placet! ai the bar, felt, quite, lo a! One day, no'. Ion? sine-, he was seen I when arraigned, and complained bnierly ;'ntUIymo; 1ealui ii upon a wall, a lew rods of i he shotiM be i-hir-l m Mich an j "lonixalion. n i i i... in checking tin; ti. -it ,ii, is considered as among In- iic in ino.sl -W :he and several ttmon'j.' "oar first young men" in ]iur.-uit. C'rc-epiiiLT wanly ward ,0 lur home. The Judge f bf'hind and bu-he.-', they would calm. oun-j man. thai to him, appear to n ou the Spirit of the Times) but we menially attain n ue.-irulil'j proxitnity and -It t fly." i.-. full hi don'- l'i _ -I i 1 inquire what was ihe sentence }iunishment Perh.aps it wa- ealrultiiifin. Perhaps he was told to walk the earth until he counted a trillion. Bui. will say ,-omo folks, he could soon that number. "We fear jlc .rrave and reverend president of the me yer honor, (innnncd i, j [u. however. ;o or three tim---, but the nreat; 11 olared unmove'i. hie murk'.-- j Id retire .-tMr-fied and and frar me man to count one in every nf day and mghl, wr.hoiu t.p ivst. to ea'. to drink or to it inke iliinv-two years to count a Inllnm. or years to count a trillion What a limited idea we rreneralh" entertain nf man wouu WOll! 1 The Teslll' Some came back bold! and others, .-linking in n a tnwl: TIL' p ft fei.v o a liii-nd v. 'hi- t -A Muffed owl had been made oi quit tin and then you 'he 'jun your-elf. St' by of a h: r.-t-r m ilj) wax moral and rclrnoi wri'er 'nrii f ca; not hut i'd1' aiid i niitii' n'lv i at tin-, failv pi ol a pour rl'd 'a modi ni a oini to t pimc.p ol i' )ll Tlie.S- llie wife of I Jr. Urantncr, of Ir-ft her infant child, I about i> mon'h.s old. ash ep in her cliatn- atid j j shc n the infant's near the child's nc' of tick in" ils Krom Baltimore American. al ''Hiig There appears to be nothing in all the means and appliances of the Whigs that so disconcert our Van Huron friends as the free and hearty songs in which the names of and FRKLIXOIIUYSKX are sounded from one end of the country to the other. There, are no elements of spirit of in the name- of VAN or his to excite the enthusiasm which finds vent in soul- stirring strains. His character is emi- nently common-place. It rouses no no sym- pathies. If any bard should attempt to put I'an Jiuroi'' into impassioned verse the whigs of fancy would fail into col- lapse, and the step which is said to sepa- rate the sublime from the ridiculous would bo passed in a moment. Song is the language of cheerfulness and hope melody is allied with good feeling the high impulses of patriotism, of all noble devotion by which heart and soul are inspired in a great cause, find an utterance in music commensurate with their exalted nature. The use of songs then in a political can- :ass, in place of violent invective and bit- ter reproaches, which often implant vin- dictive animosities ami cultivate bad feel- ings among citizens, is a good sign of the times. It is good not only as il prog- nosticates the triumphant success of the it is good also as constitu- ting a new feature in politics. People will not quarrel when their political dif- ferences are expressed in songs. Good humor is generated by singing. There is generally more or less wit in thesepolitical melodies of the something at all events to disarm partisan asperity of its sting, or to takeaway its poison. Let the songs go on then; let the chorus swell in full resounding tone- A ny cause which can be made the themeof song is not abaci cause any man whose name gives spirit to music, whose deeds can infuse life and melody. into odes and "ballads, has something ster- ling in stuff. When FUKJ.INUIIUYSKN was nomina- ted there was some fear that his name would not run well inlo verse. As for T IKNKY of the name hadbeen woven into all sorts of measure long ago. It had become a household to music for all instruments. We shall sub- join some specimens of recent acts to show that the name of ITRKI.I is not only an excellent one in all political respects, but a capital one for a song also. The first rhymes on the occasion of Mr. FUKLINTMIUYSKN'S nomination were made by Mr. Hardi'ii, of Illinois, who was on his way to this city in the Wil- mington train when by a train from Balti- more the news was brought of the nomi- nation to the. Vice Presidency. Here is I he stanza throw our banner to the breeze, Its ample inlds ulolt nre rising In u'ord.s il. there disjilays Tim nnnios of Clay and Krelinghnyscn." On the morning of ihe great Ratifica- tion Convention the Whigs of Vermont, as they inarched in procession, sung to a popular air a very animating song, in, which the foregoing rhyme was already embodied. We copy a single stanza Oh the1 '-Yankee boys'' arc wide awake, Tlipy conn' fioni lull, from valley and lake, And the they lioth night and day Is "clear tlu-lraclc for Harry flay'.'1 jliirrali hurrah! Vermont is rising. Ilinrah! hurrah! Vermont is rising, Ilnnali hurrah !_ Vermont is.rising. For HAIMU- CLAY and FIIJ-.HNUIILTSEX On the .same system of pronunciation, are the following from the Hartford Cou- rant: The {jreal Whit; army's organizing [fndfr flay and Fn-limihuyjen yen hear the blast? I'on't y0'1 -see tlio lianti'.'is fiy? 'I'll'' Wliijc army's driving llin rah lor Cl.iy and victory. lounil ;i laf.oj 'al lym j v.'iili head mouth, n-, ii' in the bp'a'.li. 1 'jion exaniiualionlhe child was ovcp-d br; having tnet its jrlea'h in this mor.textraordinary and hor- the i minonsity of number.--. fs. The nerve of a tooth. no: as large as the finest cambric i will drive a stronir man to  f '.vor. i. lihh that hve.s yi t il i- Mill F..-KI'.U U'liiTF. ii kn'.v.n l ol r. No ie Mi. experience ol good orchardist.s prove that the bi.-si for pruning trees i.s lhe latter port of I Juin: or ih': of Ji.ly. To kill briais, cut ilieni off m turn m sheep, and they are ?oon eMr'nnmated. Sorrn say cut thi.'in oil'in the old the moon, i when the i.s in the heart but we i have no faith in that- l in; i.ocoh now are i iVc.m ol Clay ami Freliniilmyseii. llmrali for Clav people shonl, And loo, So too the following from the New- ark' Our foes aie unsteady, for office they're aiming, Van Umi'ii i-.sinkinir, his parly disclaim him; I'ut mir union's onr hopes lealizing, Through liiidannted CLAY and true TUELISQ- nr Our h.unici on our creed nnrlisgiiisjinfr, laily 1'orCt.AV and true Fur.i.i.voiiuTSEN. Otlfr bards are snore ingenious 'flu- aident. intention. 'J'o out the national poison, [taxe fixed upon Clay, To pilot, the way jjooil I'rcliiiiihuyjcu. A has iho following r-p- iirrain It WOV( Mark, 1 say! Save Uemy Cl.iy, In our The star Th.it hi-.ini-i alar, Is Ficlinghuyten! is found that FKF.i.iNcniuysEN is a of-'exceeding jrooil word melodious and full of harmony. It will be sounded, along with that of ITKif- through every quarter of the land, and with his it will be heard in the chorus that shall celebrate the cl- of both to the high places of the Republic.   

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