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East Berlin News Newspaper Archive: May 23, 1930 - Page 1

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   East Berlin News (Newspaper) - May 23, 1930, East Berlin, Pennsylvania                               IF ITS NOT IN THE NEWS IT DIDN'T HAPPEN AROUND HERE EAST BERLIN NEWS: VILLE NEWS BVBUtt AMD VOL. 18. EAST BERLIN, PA., FRIDAY, MAY Re-Nominated GRUNDY, PINCHOT, BROOKS, SHEELY, WEIKERT NOMINATED Although JameB J. Davis, secretary of labor in the Hoover cabinet, ia conceded winner in the contest for the Re- publican nomination for United States senator from Penn- sylvania, Adams county grave Joseph R. Grundy, the present senator, a plurality of almost votes, the largest plural- ity accorded any candidate in this county. With 41 of the 42 voting precincts reported at noon Wednesday, the unofficial vote for, these two candidates is Grundy, Davis, 735. Gilford Pinchot, former governor of Pennsylvania, who ran an independent campaign for the Republican guberna- torial 'nomination, carried the county by a plurality of according to the official tabulation of votes in 41 districts. Finchot Gaining Early Wednesday Pinchot was reported cutting deeply into the early lead established by Francis Bhunk Brown, and final returns from throughout the state still to be heard from may give the fanner governor the nomi- nation he sought. About mid-forenoon, O. R. Thompson, who conducted the Pin- chot campaign in Adams county, received a telegram from the former governor stating that he had won and congratulated the local chairman for his efforts. The unofficial totals for Pinchot and Brown in Adams county were Pinchot, 2668; Brown, 820. In the fight for the Republican congressional nomination, Edward S. Brooks, former York postmaster, carried Adams county over Franklin Menges, the incumbent in congress, seeking election for the fourth term, but Menges' majority in York county was sufficient to carry him to victory by a margin of 2393 votes, according to the unofficial "tabulation in the two counties. The vote for the two candidates in both counties was Menges, 9358; Brooks, 7085. Menges' vote in York county alone, 7750, exceeded Brooks' total in the two counties. Adams coun-. ty's vote for the two men Was Menges, 1608; Brooks, 1970. Sheely's Plurality George D. Sheely, New Oxford, won the Republican nomination for the state legislature, with a plurality of 417 votes, in a three- cornered contest. The vote for the three candidates follows: Sheely, 1633; Emory B. Collins, 1216; Harry B Stock, 008. Sheely, the incumbent, IA seeking re-election for a second term in the lower house. Wilbur A. Geiselman, Adams county clerk of the courts, defeated Clarence Snytier, Straban town- ship, for election as chairman of the Adams county Republican com- mittee toy an unofficial majority of 101 votes. ccmnt being Geisel- mao, .IHfr; Snyder, 1414, with all but one district heard from and that one so small that its figures will not change the final standing of the two candidates. Geiselman, who had the backing of the Grundy organization in the county, was given a large vote In Gettysburg Snyder had the sup- port of the Pinchot committee in the county. Crushed To Death Under Road Roller Tabulated Vote in Adams County Few Wets Here Wet candidates for governor and United States senator made poor showings in On the face of incomplete returns, Edwartf-Ct Shannon, Lancaster, Re- publican candidate for lieutenant governor, "was nominated over Charles F. Armstrong, Armstrong county, who had the backing of Pinchot, by a narrow margin. with Charles Dorrance and Frank P B. Thompson, Philadelphia, trailing. James Flemming Woodward, Alle- gheny county, was nominated Re- publican secretary of internal af- iairs in a five cornered race, and George W Maxey, Lackawanna county, received the Republican nomination in the county judge of the supreme court over Albert Dutton MacDade, Delaware county. William B. Linn and J. Frank Crushed beneath the huge of a 14-ton steam roller about 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon while he was working on the rebuilding of a state highway between York Springs ana Hampton, Jerry H Harman. a res- ident of Hunterstown, was almost instantly killed Harman, at work__________ no his knees leveling stone with his back to the roller, is thought not to A ,wn nave heard it approaching until it was too late to save himself. He is Bendersviiie said to have been slightly deaf The Berwlck right side of his body was crushed Biglervillc and every bone in his head, which REPUBLICAN DEMOCRATIC I I o I 48 58 38 16 I was left imbedded in the loose stone of the road, broken An attempt was made to rescue Harman by Robert Dellmger, a fel- low workman who resides at New Oxford Dellinger yelled to the op- erator of the steam roller, Thomas Get many Hardman Gettysburg, to stop the Gettysburg, 1, 1 machine when he first caught Har- amn s foot and at the same time Butler Conewago 109 44 87 106 71 85 26 14 164 Gettysburg, 1, 2 185 Gettysburg, 2 185 Cumberland Erst Berlin Pairfield Fianklin Freedom attempted to drag Harman from I Gettysburg, 3 FRANKLIN MENG Wins by 417 under the roller He continued pull- ing until he had torn the sleeve from the shut Harman was wear- ing, a few seconds before he would have been drawn under the machine himself Back Toward Roller While a statement from Hard- man, the operator of the machine, was not available Wednesday night it was reported that he did not see the man working in front of him until the front roller of the ap- paratus ran over Harman's foot, when he found that he could not stop the roller Dellinger, who at- tempted to pull Harman from the path of the machine, said that he had yelled at Hardman and that the latter had attempted to work the controls of the roller, without stop- ping the machine, however Harman, who was 58 years old and unmarried, was at work leveling loose stones' on a section of the highway which is being rebuilt, pre- paratory to having the heavy steam roller roll the roadbed into a com- pact mass He was at work on his knees with his back to- the roller when Hardman, on the roller, began his part of the work It is supposed that both Hardman and Harman were unaware of the other's proximity until the roller caught the latter's foot At this time, Dellinger yelled and attempt- ed to pull his fellow employe from beneath the heavy wheels of the roller. By the time the machine was stopped, it had rolled over the entire right side of the body and was partially at rest on the head of the man Because of the loose- ness of the stones, each of which was about as 'We as a man's fist, the body was not mashed flat However. Harman's head was crushed almost beyong recognition and was imbedded among the stones on the road 134 19 79 3 -33 65 31 118 23 102 102 4 i McSherryst'n, 2 15 Menallen 224 Mount Joy 71 Mt Pleasant, 1 26 Mt Pleasant, 2 1 Mt Pleasant, 3 14 New Oxford 108 Oxford 22 Reading 21 Straban 75 22 Hamilton Hamiltonban, 1 Hamiltonban, 2 Highland Huntmgton, 1 Huntington, 2 Latimore Liberty Littlestown, 1 Littlestown, 2 McSherryst'n, 1 Tyrone, 1 Tyrone, 2 Union York Springs Totals 15 60 2711 9 12 9 4 36 16 9 48 21 10 31 15 2 64 44 77 69 2 13 9 2 10 Ifr 1 15 44 2 5 19 23 3 1 8 27 18 36 6 2 3 735 16 2" 11 4 23 11 7 40 62 8 36 14 3 73 71 99 73 11 13 10 3 10 1 29 21 12 12 26 13 8 1 7 17 17 38 3 2 15 820 34 71 33 14 108 116 37 101 83 78 90 31 13 140 166 159 159 22 86 5 32 64 39 124 23 81 87 2 8 229 78 33 14 97 10 25 78 28 15 55 34 42 'X 10 54 65 18 85 84 34 81 20 6 131 161 157 152 2 66 1 26 52 35 108 23 71 61 7 12 89 33 19 2 14 47 9 31 45 21 7 29 26681970 23 27 19 8 72 62 39 56 65 55 49 17 14 92 71 110 81 20 19 17 20 9 26 50 60 9 11 160 67 12 96 16 16 70 11 13 38 1608 38 15 7 7 6 20 19 59 81 5 50 8 19 96 88 73 83 2 24 1 19 15 7 25 2 108 98 4 7 60 54 4 2 10 7 2 16 29 1 18 27 1216 11 48 23 7 108 89 17 52 35 59 48 19 2 84 112 121 84 20 40 14 31 11 87 14 15 16 4 6 132 23 24 8 112 26 17 56 33 1 24 1633 6 5 13 6 20 16 11 21 13 10 29 5 41 21 57 49 19 1 10 25 24 14 5 7 9 7 9 44 12 5 5 28 1 11 28 3 1 12 603 40 29 17 8 50 27 27 46 81 11 59 19 5 126 125 146 109 2 20 1 19 29 18 23 .3 66 63 14 12 96 25 14 2 6 60 8 28 33 8 10 30 1515 17 27 17 10 64 88 10 57 28 70 52 12 4 63 85 82 99 16 00 19 28 15 98 20 1C 24 1 1 112 33 11 14 50 12 11 54 16 6 12 1414 16 3 4 7 5 5 28 12 3 15 1 4 7 6 U 6 13 2 4 32 12 21 2 15 9 35 59 3 3 2 26 6 9 13 12 13 13 10 33 481 20 9 3 2 7 4 12 22 7 13 6 8 6 8 9 13 11 5 4 3 1 2 2 1 23 10 4 9 2 54 1 I 7 28 9 9 8 2 9 3 357 15 16 6 9 22 16 11 24 16 26 4 9 47 46 48 74 4 9 5 10 5 7 2 6 17 17 8 19 3 8 3 6 66 19 13 6 1 15 3 13 653 8 4 6 2 8 17 9 4 11 3 6 6 10 9 5 1 4 4 14 6 8 3 10 5 32 44 1 14 6 30 0 2 7 5 1 7 10 8 336 32 18 6 5 24 12 18 29 18 22 3 12 43 54 73 11 10 2 6 13 11 11 2 22 34 12 45 4 19 4 13 17 40 25 10 23 1 9 12 19 744 Pinchot Victor In CHURCH NOfUCBft Fight For Governor ZZTL Gifford Pinchot, Independent Republican candidate for governor, on Sunday led Francis Shunk Brown, backed by! the usual hoar by the 14 24 6 14 16 11 4 20 3 3 7 4 6 12 4 8 5 6 4 4 4 13 8 1 1 3 18 2 8 19 16 6 7 314 the Philadelphia Vare organization, bv 10000 votes on the face of un- official returns from all but 212 dis- tricts in Pennsylvania in Tuesday's primary election Additional scattered returns from rural districts overcome Brown's lead and placed the former govern- or well in front for his party's nom- ination for another term The late returns swelled the over' whelming plurality of Secretary of Labor James J Davis over United States Senator Joseph R Grundy to more than 238000 Expect Greater Pinchot Gain The missing districts were scat- tered throughout the state and were expected by Pinchot leaders to in- crease his lead and to make little change to the Grundy-Davis totals. The totals for governor from 8 489 districts out of gave Pin- chot 618504; Brown 608.454 and Thomas W. Philips, wet candidate, 260.283. A total of districts gave for senator: Davis Senator Grundy and Francis H. Bohlen, running-mate of Philips, 233.877 Pinchot carried all of the 67 coun- ties of the state except Philadel- phia, Chester, Delaware, Lacka- wanna, Lancaster, Lenten and Erie whicch was carried by Philips. In, the upstate counties Pinchot received sufficient support in the unofficial returns to overcome the vote handicap he received in the City of Philadelphia Davis had the advantage of the tremen- dous Philadelphia vote and suc- ceeded In adding to it upstate, where Grundy's strength was prov- en far below that of Pinchot. V. Btrausbavfh. Cfcsmli Services Sunday Hampton. Latnuoro and Name Speakers For 3 Services Speakers for Memorial Day exer- cises at The Pines, Hampton and Heidlersburg were announced Fri- day by the Rev J. Harold Little, Gettysburg, in charge of the various services At Hampton, May 28, at o'clock, Joseph Beaverson, York, will be the speaker; at Heidlersburg, May 30, at 6-30 o'clock, the Rev. Paul Glatfelter, Abbottstown, and at The Pines, May 31, at 6-30 o'clock, the Rev Dr. A. R. Steck, Carlisle. GEORGE D. SHEELY ture in a three-candidate contest With D Calvin Rudisill also a ior- mer member ol the lower house, and Charles M Boyer running against him, Weikert polled 653 votes; Boyer, 481, and Rudisill, 357, with one district to be reported. Roy P Funkhousei Gettysburg was unopposed for Democratic state committeemaii Irom Adams county Graff were nominated m the county for judge of ihe superior court. Charles E. Deatrick, Blglerville was elected Republican state com- mitteeman from Adams county, de- feating Harry T. Stauffer, Gettys- burg. The vote, was Deatrick, 1849; Stauffer, 1416, with a num- ber of districts still unreported Democrats nf Pennsylvania had no contests for senator, governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of internal affairs, Judge of the su- preme court and judge of the su- perior court.. Nominated Harry L. Haines, burgess of Red Lion, was chosen by the Democrats, as their standard-bearer for the fall congressional campaign, with Congressman Menges as nls oppo- nent. The Red Lion burgess out- stripped Andrew J. Herthey by a plurality of about 2900 votes in a three-cornered contest The count in the two counties for the three wu Haines, 5061; Hersney. 2127, and Strtcknouwr, 1944 vote in Adams county WM Haines, 744; Strtekhouser, MB; Hershey, 914 Interest in the returns was at fe- ver pitch at the office of the county commissioners and the Pinchot and Grundy headquarters after the polls closed Tuesday evening Fairficld was the fiist 1o send in returns, Riving the figures in the Republican contests at 8 o clock, an hour after for jthe polls closed The three headquarters were thronced with easer spectators un- til they were closed early Wednes- day, the groups anxious to hear lo- Ezra Jacobs, who has been bed- fast for the past ten days, is ex- E A. Miller, coroner of Ad- i Pected to to be about again the latter part of the week The trustees of the Bermudian Reformed cemetery kindly request all persons having burial lots or friends buried there to see that same are cleaned and put in a re- spectable shape for Memorial Day Mothers' Day exercises were held in Red Mount Evangelical church. A number of exercises, recitations and songs were presented by the children and readings by some of the mothers. Mr and Mrs Stone, directors of music at the Evangel- ical tabernacle, York, were present and rendered several solos and duets A large audience was pres- ent The offering of the evening was presented to the Old Folks home at Lewisburg Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Gotwalt Sat- urday celebrated the fifty-fifth an- niversary of their wedding at the home of their daughter and son- in-law, Mr and Mrs Edwin Lefever, Thomasville Mr and Mrs Gotwalt were born and raised in York coun- ams county, was called and after an investigation, signed a death cer- tificate saying that in his opinion death was entirely accidental 1 Harman is survived by three i brothers, Henry, with whom he sided at Mummasburg; Robert, Mummasbutg, and Reuben, near Gettqsburg, and three sisters, Mrs Hall Thompson and Mrs. William Matthews both of Hunterstown, and Mrs. John Hostler. Gettysburg. The body was removed from the scene- of the accident Wednesday afternoon by Deatrick Brothers, Gettysburg funeral directors, and taken to their establishment, where it will be held until funeral serv- ices are held LOCAL NEWS Bdward L Weikert. Jr. Gettys- burg. former memMr of the legis- WM nominated by the Dem- party for the state tefMa- cal and state returns as weH Most of the judges had made their retuins to the cjrnmissioners' office Wednesday afternoon, but the board in Tyrone township failed to leave one of the triplicate return sheets outside the sealed envelope, thereby preventing newspaper men from securing the vote in that dis- trict. The official count of the ballots cast in Tuesday's primary will be- gin at noon Friday, in the office of the commissioners It cost Adams county 45 for each vote cast in the voting precinct of Hamiltonban township No 2 in Among this year's graduates at the Ctate Teachers' college at Ship- pensburg are- Romalne E. Deltz and Ruth Long, Wellsville; Almira Miller, R Frances Myers, Ruth E Shelly and Bernadetta Strayer. all of Dillsburg The number of grad- uates from York county number 30. Upon the hardening of the ce- ment the pouring of which has been completed upon the approach- es to the new bridge over the Con- ewago at the west end of East Ber- lin travel will be in order for quite a distance, the highway practically being completed to the C. B. Kauff- man farm Geo A Hull 'ocal farm machine- ry dealer, delivered nine pieces of machinery last week, consisting of 2 side rakes. 2 hay loaders, 1 bind- er and 4 cultivators Read his adv. elsewhere The Lyric Entertainers will give a free entertainment on the Hoov- er House lawn this coming Satur- ty They have nine grandchildren and children. 45 twenty-nine great-grandchildren Mr Gotwalt is a retired carpenter The regular quarterly communion service will be observed on Sunday, June 1. at 9 30 a. m, at the Para- dise Evangelical Lutheran church, the Rev. G W. Enders, Jr., D. D, pastor Letters testamentary on the es- tate of Aaron G Smith, Washing- ton township, have been granted to Portis A Smith Joseph C. March and wife trans- ferred to Homer H Smith and wife, a property in Warrington township Mrs. Harrison Kimmel, of West York, fell recently in the Latimore Valley fair grounds Mrs. Kimmel, with her husband and niece. Violet Tuesday's primary. Five Republi- dancing, etc Don't fail to see and cans and fourteen Democrats voted hear this entertainment in the district, and the election The hauling of stone for the two dav evening. There will be music, I Detter was leaving the grounds board's expenses were Marshall H Poff, Wrightsville, Is the Republican candidate for representative in the House of Rep- resentatives from the Second leg- islative district of York county. He has a sizeable lead over Chester H. GroM, present member. The result of the vote In the Democratic con- test for this nomination is aim mile stretch of highway through Davidsburg began Wednesday morn- ing, twenty trucks being employed. The work Is being done by the York Construction and Engineering Co "Aunt Kate" Myers. M usual this when Mrs. Kimmel tripped on a porch step and fell on the side- walk. She was taken to the West Side sanitarium, York, where an examination revealed a fracture of the left arm at the wrist and oth- er bruises about the body. She WM admitted as a patient with matches caused the spring is sending her brother. John death of Carl Grumbine. four and Stevens, of Kenesha. Wisconsin, a batch of sweet potato sprouts that seem to grow potatoes of a larger one-half year old son of Mr and Mrs Ira OrumMne, York, In the York hospital. week. The and better order In the soil out mother WM also admitted to the cloM, with Raymond H. Shettle there than in Adams county ground hospital, suffering from severely leading over John H. Hankie by a small margin. _ land seem to even beat the home- i frown of that locality. burned hands. Franklin towwhip, York oawrty, Fire Destroys Auto And Shed Fire believed to have started by a short circuit in an automobile Sunday afternoon destroyed one of the outbuildings on the farm of L V. McElwee, along the Conewago creek back of Dicks Dam together with the Contents of the shed, in- cluding an Oakland selan. a trac- tor, a binder and A number of tools The blaze was discovered at about 1.30 o'clock, and persons ar- riving first on the scene expressed the belief the fire had started in the automobile and spread to the building in which the car was standing. Neighbors gathered quick- ly and attempted to extinguish the blaze but were unable to save the building The farmhouse, barn and other structures nearby were saved from the flames through the efforts of the neighbors aided by the wind which carried the fire away from the other buildings Mr and Mrs. McElwee and other members of the family were away from home at the time the fire started and knew nothing of their loss until they returned after the blaze nad been quenched. shed and the automobile were cov- ered by insurance. PROPERTY TRANSFERS Jonas Gise, to W. H. sutler, a property in Jackson township. W H Stitler to Robert T Gise, a property in Jackson township. Jonas Gise to Stewart Senft, Sr., a property in Jackson township. Fannie M. March to James J Logan, a tract of land in Warring- ton township Fred Braebaum, by assignee, transferred to Jack Freedman, two lots in Warrington township Jack Freedman transferred to Edw N Reineberg and others, a tract of land in Warrington town- Ship. Jacob W Heilman estate trans- ferred to Wm H. Heilman, a prop- erty in Dover township. gained 21 inhabitants in ten years, the 1930 population being 739. Paradise township's 1930 popula- tion is compared with 11 10 in a loss of 85 Letters of administration on the estate of Joseph B. Oochenour. Wellington township, have been granted to Ann Gettys The Manufacturers Light it Heat Company having represented that it will be impossible for It to exercise the rights granted for the purpose of supply! nng gas to Dover. that borough has repealed the or- dinance granting the Manufactur- ers company a franchise to operate In Dover. The department an- nounced Wednesday that the civil service oommlSBton nan certified Mrs Ada 8 Holllnger M the only ellftMe candidate for the postmas- tershlp at Hanover. The annual ts Btrftn recently defeated Dr. CrtSt'S AJHMara, 11-10, E. Berlin Girl Awarded Prize Miss Helen K. Nell, East Berlin, was awarded the first prize, a check for for showing %he greatest improvement In her classroom work and nursing at the Harrisburg hos- meeting houses. Sunday monrinc at Aft- bottstown and at Bast BarUn fat eveninc. by the Rev. Paul Ot er. Hampton at M a. u. New Chester at 3 p. m. New Cheater Missionary society at 7-30 p. m. Sunday School lesson: the Future of The King- dom." Bermudian (Mt. Olivet) PERSONAL Mrs. Florence Mummert, of Har- rlsburg, spent several days with East Berlin and Abbottstown friends Mr and Mrs Samuel Baker, daughter, Mildred, and son, Irvin, near this place, spent Sunday with Mrs. Ellen Shrlver, New Oxford. Miss Margaret Young, who spent several weeks with her grandmoth- pital, Harrisburg, Friday where she er, Mrs. Alice Young, at York, re- was graduated along with four turned to her home here, on Mon- other Adams county girls in a class of 27. The other girls from this county to M given diplomas in the exercises at the William High school were Mary Elizabeth Kebil, Falrfleld; Dorothy Louise Neely, York Springs; Pauline Rulick Stock, Hampton, and Mary Evelyn Yohe, Abbottstown. Haines Sweeps His Home Town Harry L Haines, successful can- didate for the Democratic nomina- tion for congress from the Adams- York congressional district in the primary election, received 440 of the 455 votes cast in Red Lion, his home town. In Yoe, a nearby town, he received every vote cast. Haines polled 744 votes in -Adams county. The Bunds> school class of Otter- bein church. Hanover, taught by E. W. Bellinger, met Thursday eve- ning at the home of Tolbert Stern- er, near Cross Keys. There were thirty-six members at the meeting. A pleasing program had been ar- ranged for the evening A carp weighing 14 pounds, and measuring 30 Inches in length and 20 inches in girth, was caught by George F. Boyer, Hanover, Satur- day afternoon while fishing in the Conewago creek at East Berlin A battle of an hour and 30 minutes was required to'land the fish. Mr. Boyer was assisted in bringing his catch to terra ftrma by two of his companions on the excursion, Clair Thoman and Charles Harbaugh The East Berlin News extends its congratulations to Dr I. H ler, a prominent physician of York, on the occasion of his birthday The Gettysburg classis of the Re- formed church, which met in its 48th annual session at Dubs' church, near Hanover, adjourned on Wednesday at 4'35 p m and will again convene on October 28th in the New Oxford Reformed church The Rev Harry D Houta, pastor of Zwingli Reformed church. East Ber- lin, has been elected president. Saturday, June 14. Z E Craum- er, Exr, of estate of J W Albright, deceased, will sell the poultry farm, together with equipment and a lot of other personal property. John Rider, who makes weekly trips to Baltimore through his busi- ness as a fish and produce dealer, on Wednesday delivered at the Hoover restaurant, on the Squarr, Bast Berlin, a sixty-pound turtle from that city that was converted Into a fine onftr of soup by a chef brought for that pur- pose. The Bast Berlin band will go to Red Lion on tetvrday eveninc and J Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Chapman and son, Bermudian, were visitors on Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lerew. Mr, and Mrs. David Heddlng and Mrs. Theodore Wagner, of York, on Sunday visited Mr. and Mrs. Cor- nelius Keeney. Eugene Darone will return home this week, the spring term of the State Teachers' college at Ship- pensburg. having closed. Mr. and Mrs Charles Ream, Mrs Elizabeth Jacobs and daughter, Iva Mr and Mrs Lewis Kauffman anc son, Melvin, all of York; Emory Orner, of Arendtsvllle, and Miss Josephine Bosserman, of Abbotts' town, were all visitors of Mr. and Mrs. John Jacobs. Sunday. Mr. and Mrs Morris Detter, ol York, were guests on Sunday of Mrs Georgia Detter Mr. and Mrs. Burt Trimmer anc son. Roy, and Lucy Hoffman. Red Run; Merle Zeigler, of Wellsville; Guy Slothour, Abbottstown, and Clara Hoffman. York, were visitors on Sunday of Emanuel Sinner. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Kauffman and son, and Mr. and Mrs John Anthony, ot York, were visitors on Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Ollie My- ers Miss Maryida Mummert, who spent several days with E. A Brown and family, at Mulberry, has re- turned home Mr and Mrs Emory Fisher, Mr and Mrs Lewis Fisher, Mrs Emory Fisher, Sr. and Miss Lila Fisher all of Harrisburg, visited at the home of the Misses Sara and Beu- lah Leas Sunday afternoon The following irom this place at- tended the funeral of Mrs. Milton Rohrbaugh at Lischeys church, near Spring Grove, on Sunday aft- ernoon Mr. and Mrs Robert Shel- ter, George Moul, Mr and Mrs Washington Hoover and Mr and Mrs W H Sinner and family The following were guests of W A Sinner and family, Sunday: Mr. and Mrs Ross Rohrbaugh and son. harry. Clarence and Kenneth, of Millers. Md Mr and Mrs. George dren's Day exercises, Sunday Jmue 1st, at o'clock. The recital by Prof. K. A. desven occurred in the church on Thursday well-rendered and enjoyed audience. The Miototerlal association of Gettysburg classis will tgft Reformed paraonace at ville, Monday afternoon, at o'clock. The executive oommittee of the Fourth district Sunday School as- sociation met at the Lutfceran church, East Berlin, to arrangements for the next tlon to fee held In the church at Abbottstowu, on the- aft- ernoon and eveninc of The district in composed Of Berlin, Abbottstown, and Hampton. Emmanuel Reformed church, Ak- services: Chorda School a. Service of wonfclf a. m. Please note the in time. The church serriee. be held in the mormnv instead the evening because of an with new Oxford. Be at School promptly at nine m we em get into the church service at This will enable us to attand' baccalaureate services of bottstown school widen be held to St JitaVtatbsra. Sermon suWect; The refular monthly the Mlssiomry society bs bttd at the church on Holiday May 3Mb, at 1-M. Terk: Lower at a. m., preaehlnc a. m. York School at a. m, eatschlse at p. m, preaehlnc service at p. m. Chestnut School at a. m. Lutheran services Sunday: At Hampton at 10 a. m.. at "The Pines" at 2 p. m., at Heldlersburc at p. m. High School Commencement The annual commencement ex- ercises of the Bast Berlin high school will be held in Reformed church, Friday. Hay 20, at 0 o'clock, The program has been woven around one central theme, "Scenes of Romantic Interest In Pennsyl- vania." Salutatory Ethel M. Spanvler "Old Jesuit Mission of Buchanan Valley" Solo Mrs. Lavere Burgard Oration Merrill Wlsjer Of James Buchanan" Organ Solo Merton HUnes Valedictory Lucy Hoffman "The Church of the Roses" Solo Mrs. Lavere Burgard Address Dr. G. M. DUXenderftr "What Presentation of Class Day Frecram Class Day exercises will be held In the P O 8 of A hall at 8 o'clock this Thursday as follows: 1 Class History Piano Solo Class Will Reading Class Prophecy Presentation o George Roberta Dorothy WerU Ethel Spangler Merrill Wisler Dorothy wertt My- ers, Carl Jacobs Piano Solo Reading Dorothy Werts Lucy Hoffman Cramer and daughters, Effle and i Awarding of the Honor Key Beatrice, and Mr and Mrs Maurice Mantle Oration Kathryn Roberts Cramer, of Glenville. and Mr. and j Receiver of Mantle Lester Brown Mrs. Arble Shrlner and son, Ray- mond, of Hanover. Mr and Mrs. P. W. Kimmel. Mr and Mrs C A. Butt and Mrs. Louise Kimmel, this place, were guests of Edward Kinter and family in Dills- burg, Sunday Adjournment Two chestnut trees, out elcht feet and the other seven feat to dl> ameter. were removed farm of Mrs. Annie Mwtfc Miss Beatrice Cramer, Olenvllle.! township, York the week with Irene Harry and son. In spending Sinner ________________ a cross cut saw, they triad The Bast Berlin band will hold a mltlnt biff picnic and festival at Fanner's down Orove, near town, on Saturday evening. May 31. Tho Labott band will f uralab Mr UM   

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