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Clearfield Progress: Tuesday, November 8, 1966 - Page 1

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   Clearfield Progress (Newspaper) - November 8, 1966, Clearfield, Pennsylvania                                Today's Chuckle Mother: "Now, Junior, be a good boy and say 'ah' so the doctor can get his finger out of your mouth." The Progress Reader's Tip For more on today's election, turn to Pages 2 and 7. Vol. 60 - No. 264 Our 56th Year Clearfield, Curwensville, Philipsburg, Moshannon Valley, Pa.,   Tuesday, November 8, 1966 15,155 Copies Daily 40 PAGES TODAY RESCUED FROM ITALIAN FLOOD - Two firemen rescue an old man from the Alpago countryside near Belluno, Italy after the worst flooding in 1,000 years hit northern Italy. Officials fear 40 inhabitants of the area may have perished in the torrential downpour. Story Page 7. (AP Wirephoto by cable from Milan) 59 Million Expected To Vote By JACK BELL WASHINGTON (AP)-Balloting was reported heavy in a number of crucial areas around the nation today as the sovereign American voter turned out to elect 435 House members, 35 senators and 35 governors. The trend of the early-bird balloting indicated the total vote might be around 59 million, a record for a nonpresidential year. Mistaking the poll openine time, President Johnson turned up 39 minutes too soon to register his choices in the kitchen of the Pedernales Electric Cooperative at Johnson City, Tex. Considering his position, poll officials let him and the-First Lady vote right away, even though there had been brave talk about treating the chief executive as "just one of the boys." To the surprise of no one, Johnson announced: "I voted the Democratic ticket." In   New   York,   where   the weather was mild, a tight gubernatorial struggle between Republican Nelson A. Rockefeller and Democrat Frank D. O'Connor drew a heavy vote, at least in some places. The early-morning turnout was massive in New York City, where an issue with racial overtones was on the ballot. This is a referendum challenging a civilian-dominated police review board. On the other hand the voting was extremely light in Buffalo. Early returns in Michigan, where Gov. George Romney's political future is being weighed, also indicated a heavy turnout. In the suburbs of voteless Washington, balloting was reported extremely heavy in nearby Maryland counties and mod' erate to heavy in northern Virginia. Soon after the polls opened in these suburbs, officials noted heaviest voting in predominantly Negro areas. The Justice Department announced it had sent federal election observers to 27 counties in four Southern states, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Mississippi. Ramsey Clark, acting attorney general, said this was clone under the 1965 Voting Rights Act "to help ensure that local election officials are able to conform their practices fully with state and federal laws." The nonpresidential-ycar elections are almost as variable as the weather. Frustrations of the Viet Nam war, white rection to racial disturbances, high cost of living irritation and the impact of President Johnson's "Great Society" programs provide an uncertain background for th� balloting. Nowhere in advance of tonight's countdown of votes was there any evidence of a national trend on these or any other issues. Please Turn to Page 6, Col. 1 Curwensville Groups Pledge Support To $15,000 Park Drive CURWENSVILLE - Six organizations including Borough Council pledged their support last night to a $15,000 goal aimed at expanding and improving facilities at Curwens-ville's Irvin Park. Possible ways of collecting the needed funds also were discussed and Raymond L. Curry, general chairman of the park improvement campaign, said he would like to see construction start by May 1. Support for the fund-raising effort came from the - Woman's   Club,   Lions   Club, Methodist EUB DelegatesMeet, Ponder Merger CHICAGO (AP) - "No church can live unto itself," the Methodist Council of Bishops slated today in a message to the General Conference of the Methodist Church. The General Conference of the Evangelical United Brethen Church (EUB) opened a separate meeting at the same time in the same hotel. They planned it that way because representatives of the two denominations met to consider merger. Bishop Roy H. Short of Louisville, Ky., on behalf of the Methodist Council of Bishops, asserted: "The day has come when the churches of the world, sympathetically and actually, are bound up in a bundle of life together as never before in histo- Loyal Order of Moose, Women of the Moose and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary. Spokesmen for (he Moose, W.O.T.M. and the VFW Auxiliary said the matter had been discussed and approved by their respective organizations. Mrs. Kenneth Lezzer, representing the Woman's Club, said the plans have not been formally presented to club members yet but that she was sure of a favorable endorsement. Robert Blackburn, master of the Susquehanna Grange, said he would put the question before the grange board at a meeting Friday night. Frank Harzinski, president of Please Turn to Page 6, Col. 2 302 Reds Killed In Viet Action Toy Ninh Province Battle Resumed After Short Break By BOB GASSAWAY SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) - American infantrymen battled an estimated 1.000 charging Viet Cong for four hours in Tay Ninh Province today and reported 302 enemy bodies counted after the fighting ended. The battle resumed at 6 a.m. for troops of the U.S. 1st Division who lost contact almost completely Monday with the tough Viet Cong force that had battled American troops for four days. U.S. officers at operational headquarters told Associated Press photographer John Nance tonight that 302 enemy bodies had been counted after the fighting ended, thai large numbers of weapons, grenades and ammunition had.been taken and thai an 80-bed Viet Cong hospital had been found. Associated Press correspondent John Lengel reported from the battlefield that some American officers estimated 500 of the enemy were killed today. He reported one battalion of the 1st Division's 28th Regiment bore the brunt of the new fighting. American casualties were officially reported light. In other scattered actions: Please Turn to Page 2, Col. 6 Slain Woman Was Sister Of Bradford Coal Co. Faces Hearing On Mine Permit Move HARRISBURG (AP) - The State Health Department filed a complaint against the Bradford Coal Co., Inc., Clearfield County, Monday charging it with operating a deep coal mine without a mine drainage permit from the State Sanitary Water Board. The department said it has scheduled a hearing on the complaint for Nov. 10 in Curwensville. Curwensville Man Peterson Named To Please Turn to Page 2, Col. 5 Litterbugs Warned ALLPORT-The Morris Township Supervisors last night issued a warning that anyone caught throwing rubbish along township roads will be fined $100 and costs. Routine business was transacted during the board's regular monthly meeting. dred Kochik, 40-year-old Clar- County National Post ence resident who was allegedly shot to death by her husband in their home here Saturday night, was the sister of Paul Girardi of Curwensville. Her husband, Joseph W. Kochik, 43, is being held without bail in the Centre County Jail at Bellefonte, pending a hearing on a charge of murder. Mrs. Kochik reportedly died instantly as the result of a single bullet wound in the head. Please Turn to Page 2, Col. 7 Carl J. Peterson was named trust officer at Monday's County National Bank board meeting  at  Clearfield. He succeeds Howard M. Mc-Garvey Jr., who has resigned to accept a position as vice president and trust officer with the Fayette Bank & Trust Company of Uniontown. Mr. Peterson has been affiliated with the County National Bank for some time and was recently named assistant trust officer. Entries Lacking for Clearfield's Christmas Parade With tlie deadline for submitting entries in Clearfield's Christmas Parade less than a week away, parade officials are beginning to wonder if there will be a parade this year. The deadline is next Tuesday, Nov. 15, and so far only one entry has been received. Area churches and civic organizations are urged to return their entry blanks as soon as possible to Miss Joyce Hoffman, 111 W. First St., Clearfield, telephone 765-4709. The parade has been set for Friday, Nov. 27, at 7 p. m. A $50 prize awaits the first place winner, which best depicts the religious theme. Other prizes are: second, $30; third, $20; fourth, $15; and fifth, $10. Last year's parade was the largest in Clearfield's history, when 20 floats were entered. The Clearfield Junior Woman's Club and the Chamber of Commerce have sponsored the parade for tho pasl five years in an effort to remind Hie area of Please Turn to Page 2, Col. t> Grampian Councilmen Discuss Collection Of Delinquent Taxes GRAMPIAN - A lengthy discussion on ways and means of collecting delinquent wage taxes highlighted last night's meeting of Grampian Borough Council. The wage tax collector, Mrs. Elda Wise, reported that she had turned over to Clyde Nicholson, justice of the peace here, a list of all 1965 wage tax delinquents. He in turn was instructed to institute proceedings to colled the back payments or fine those who fail to comply. Street Commissioner C. E. Beck was authorized to place no parking signs on borough streets to facilitate snow removal. This applies to the hours from midnight until 7 a. m. Tax receipts received thus far amount to $598.06 and bills approved for payment came to $256.83. Present at the meeting were George Mobcly, president; Fahy McDonald, Thomas Ransic, Thomas llnrmic, Bertram Dan-vir, James Wise, W. G. CIipI-gron, secretary, and Mayor Roscoe Solley. Coalport Council OKs Wage Tax, New Street Light COALPORT - Coalport Borough Council last night adopted an ordinance which calls for the enactment of an earned income and wage tax of four-tenths of one per cent. Council also approved the installation of a street light at the corner of Filbert and Railroad streets to provide more illumination at the approach to Ihe Blain  Run  Bridge. James Krause, new borough patrolman, gave a report on his activities for the past month. The purchase of his winter uniform was approved. Cost of lighting connected with the new Veteran's Memorial in front of the borough building will be assumed by the borough, it was announced. The veterans marker will be dedicated at services this Friday, Veterans Day. In preparation for winter, the councilmen agreed to advertise for bids for snow plowing and snow removal. Rids will open Please Turn to Page 2, Col. 1 At Busy Council Session ... Philipsburg Buys New Police Cor PHILI.JSBURG - Borough Council last night approved purchase of a new police car, sale of a used fire truck, an allocation for mapping the borough's sewer systems, a payment on a new fire truck, and a reduction in the town's indebtedness by $10,000. The lone bid submitted for the police,car was from Ron Stoltz Ford. The bid price, for a car listing at $2,080 ____ less a trade-in of $806.40 for the present car, was $1,173.- Inside The Progress 30 " A single bid was received for Classified Ads   .... It, U (ne   Ford   high.pressure   fire Hints From Hcloise...... 8 |nlck  Qffered  {or  sale   The Com,c*...... $3,200 bid from the community News From Around World 6 rf Hunker   in  the  Pittsburgh s�*?rt� .10- l\ area, was accepted. Obituaries ............... 2 Council voted to   set   aside Hospital News ....... 3, 13 3] qoo toward mapping the corn-Editorial, Columns .... 1 munity-s sanitary and storm Social News       3, 8, 9, 16 sewers as required by lne State Today in History ........ 4 Sanitary  Water  Board.  There School News ............. 5 wgs g (jjscussjon regarding the Church News .............1 slate orc|ers on stream  pollu- Area Servicemen ....... 14 Uon   and   announcement   was More on Viet Nam ...... 5 made tnat a ^shannon Valley - sewer meeting would be held Three Clearfield �;;� i,'.,,"^ p-lhe _      , I             _ A   payment   of   $3,341   was AfflflPflfC I /fllCA authorized on the community's fllllUCIIIJ VH�� new fjre (n|ck and u was voted 
                            

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