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Clearfield Progress Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1966 - Page 1

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   Progress, The (Newspaper) - October 29, 1966, Clearfield, Pennsylvania                               today's reel problem of lelmre it bow to keep other people front it. THE PROGRESS Reactor's Tip "Viewing Hirrisburc" airs Happy Hour OB Page 4. Vol. 60 No. Our 56th Yoar CUiariMd, PhHipeburf. Meahannen Pa., Saturday, October 29, 1966 Daily 28 PAGES TODAY THE BEWITCHING HOUR Pretty little Kitty Johnston, a Grampian fifth grader, has some timely advice for you. Tomorrow morning at 2 o'clock Daylight Saving Time wfll end so that means turning your clocks back one hour tonight. And this little Halloweener, for one, is looking forward to that extra hour of sleep. Jbhnson Appeals Anew For Hanoi Negotiations By FRANK CORMIER BANGKOK (AP) President Johnson appealed anew to Ha- noi today to negotiate a Viet Nam he praised Thailand's government for rec- ognizing the Communist threat. Addressing a sedate academic audience at Chulalongkorn Uni- versity in Bangkok, Johnson de- clared: "I say to the leaders of Hanoi let us lay aside our arms and sit down together at the table of reason." Later the President conferred for an hour with Premier Tha- nom Kittikachorn and top gov- ernment leaders around a big horseshoe-shaped table at or- nate Government House. It was here that Johnson told the Thai chiefs that their coun- try was wise to recognize early the need to meet the threat of Communist infiltration and sub- version. The chief executive also laud- ed the Thai government for pro- moting a social reform program in rural areas, saying the Thai leaders know that the battle against communism is not a purely military matter. Thanom had told Johnson about plans for a multimillion- dollar five-year program for economic and social develop- ment to encompass health, edu- cation, electric power, highway and other development pro- grams. Reporting on his govern- ment's struggle with Commu- nist guerrilla forces in the northeastern part of the coun- try, Thanom said Communist activity had decreased in recent weeks while defections from their ranks have increased. "But the Communists have not given he cautioned. In his response, Johnson said South Viet Nam is only the first target of the Communists and that they are looking at South- east Asia as a whole. It is im- portant to ''stop them where they he added. The United States has about servicemen in Thailand, mostly Air Force men who use Thai bases to bomb North Viet Nam. During his address at the uni- versity, Johnson appealed to North Vietnamese leaders to "renounce the work of and take up instead the task of the living." ''Enough of this sorrow. Let us bring the work of healing, teaching, building and providing for the children of men. This is the purpose for which we were really made. This is what our age asks us to the Presi- dent said. Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 4 Federal DST Law Effective Next Summer NEW YORK (AP) The day- Hght-standard time switchover nags its way into your life again Sunday. If you live in any of 19 states or parts of 17 others, the clock must go back an hour at 2 a.m. Sunday. This is the last year in principle, at least for time- gerryniandering. Under the Un- iform Time Act of 1966 that President Johnson signed April 14, all states must go along with fast time next summer unless the state legislature forbids it. That, anyway, is the princi- ple. An Associated Press survey shows, however, that the confu- sion isn't over yet. Most states, including many divided into strange little time fiefs, haven't decided which way they will go next April when clocks get pushed ahead again. In a state like Indiana, where Indianapolis is on Eastern Standard; the northwest part of the state is on Central Stand- ard; and Vincennes, Terre Haute and Washington are on Central Daylight, legislators haven't made up their minds. In Kentucky, which also has a series of time splits, they proba- bly won't even get around to talking about the problem in time. The legislature isn't scheduled to reconvene until 1968. It wasn't clear either what would happen to an enclave like Butte. Mont. It likes daylight time, but the rest of the state Grand Jury To Consider Murder Case A charge of murder brought against Mrs. Be mice Woods D'Amico of Clearfield will be among the 10 indictable cases to be brought before the November grand jurors next week. 39-year-old Mrs. D'Amico is charged with fatally shooting her invalid brother, 49-year-old Howard Woods last Aug. 31, at the home they shared at 616 McBride Fatal Accident Probed Near Reynoldsville REYNOLDSVILLE State police from the DuBois Substa- tion are continuing their inves- tigation of an accident early this morning which claimed the life of a Reynoldsville R. D. man. The victim was Ivan Miller who was dead on arrival at the Please Turn to Page 2, Col. 6 St. Mrs. D'Amico has been held in the Clearfield County Jail since she was arrested less than an hour after the shooting oc- curred. If she is indicted for murder she will go to trial the week of Nov. 28. The grand jury will begin its sessions at 9 a. m. Monday. Other cases to be brought be- fore it include: John D. Shifter Jr., Clearfield R. D. 2, fornication and bas- tardy; Mrs. Rose Gelnett, 108 S. Franklin St., DuBois, assault and battery; James E. Keller, 139 W. Frederick St., Millers- ville, fornication and bastardy; Walter Fink, 1004 Bald Eagle Ave., Tyrone, operating a mo- Brookville Hospital. Police said tor vehicle while under suspen- he was in his late 20's or early sion. 30's. He was struck by a car driven by Brian E. McNamee of Brook- ville. The accident occurred on Route 322 about three miles west of here at a. m. The police said Miller was apparently standing outside his car when he was hit. His car and one driven by Frederick J. Gelnette of Brookville, R. D. 1, were found stopped in their own lane of traffic. Persons involved in the ac- cident had left the scene when the police arrived. It could not be determined immediately if Gelnette's and Miller's car had been involved in an accident just before McNamee came along, or if they had stopped-on the Malaysia Prepares For LBJ Policemen Guard Capital After Demonstrations By BOB POOS KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia policemen guarded the streets of Ma- laysia's capital today to make it safe for President Johnson after three anti-American demonstra- tions, including the stoning of a hotel occupied by U.S. troops on leave. Police were posted at head- quarters of known leftist and pro-Communist groups while other police carrying rifles stood outside the U.S. Informa- tion Service office and' other possible targets of anti-Ameri- can mobs. A police official said, how- ever, one of his biggest prob- lems was expected to be keep- ing enthusiastic crowds from the presidential limousine as Johnson arrives p.m. EDT the 13th day of his Asian tour. The security operation was one of the largest since Ma- laysia was formed as a federa- tion from former British colo- nies three years ago. About 70 persons believed to have planned anti-Johnson dem- onstrations have been arrested and police' have 'confiscated stacks of anti-American pam- phlets and some anti-Johnson posters and banners. Police carrying walkie-talkies patrolled the streets. All police leaves were canceled. In addition to the regular Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 8 Gives Comprehensive Picture of Situation General Has No Doubt About Winner in Viet Willfcim, ft, with Charles H. Krey, 'Wft, 'who under him'irt O. S. S: Detachment 101 in Burma, during World War II and who it now Harbison-Walker assistant district superintendent for mining at Clearfield, and T. Jack Norris, commander of John Lewis Shade Post 6 of the American Legion, at on informal dinner in the New Dimeling Hotel last night prior to his talk on Viet Nam at the Clearfield Area High School. (Progress Photo) James B. MacMillan, Drift- Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 6 Perm Professor IVJff Speak At Cancer Institute Mostly cloudy and cool- er through Sunday with oc- casional showers. Showers mixed with snow flurries extreme north tonight and Sunday. High today low 50s to 60. Low tonight 26- 34. Sunrise Ctearfield River Level Friday 7 p. m. 4.95 feet Today 7 a. m. 4.95 feet Clearfield Weather Friday low 30; High 64. Overnight low 36. Mid State Airport Friday low 25; High 64. Overnight low 48. Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 7 Glendale District Seeking Applicants For Teacher Aides COALPORT Glendale School District is now engaged in obtaining state approval of a new ESEA Title I program. This program, to start immed- iately if approval is obtained, will involve use of teacher's aides on both elementary and secondary levels. In order to be ready to im- plement this program if ap- proval is received, the school district is now accepting ap- plications for jobs as teacher's a'des. All applicants must meet certain qualifications and appear before a screening com- United Fund Drive Nets Goal Just Away With several reports from workers still outstanding, the two-day "Whirlwind Windup" of the Clearfield Area United Fund Drive produced to boost the Fund's total to just short of the goal, UF officials announced today. "While we wish we could re- port that the two-day clean-up solicitation was a complete suc- said Chairman John H. Jackson and Vice Chairman Ralph J. Kane, ''we are pleased with the results obtained thus far and are still confident that the goal will be reached. Sever- al workers have still to report and we are hoping that their returns will close the gap corn- Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 2 At Alientown Office, Airport Shapp, Shafer Slug It Out By VINCENT CAROCCI ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) The two major gubernatorial candidates. Democrat Milton Shapp and Republican Lt. Gov. Raymond P. Shafer, slugged it out Friday at two heated face-to-face confrontations in Allentown. The first came at the offices of the Allentown Call-Chronicle newspaper. The second was an hour later, at the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton Airport terminal. Neither exchange produced any significant news since both stuck to previous stat- ed positions, charges and challenges. It did, however, put both men on display for local and travel- ing newsmen under obviously strained conditions. Shafer, who like Shapp was campaigning in the Allentown area, had a noon visit sched- Child Welfare Unit in County Airs Yule Project Space Officials Plan Moon Crash Of lunar Orbiter William E. DeMuth Jr., M.D. above, will be the kevnote speaker at the Cancer Institute for Nurses next Thursday at Clearfield. The all-day institute will be conducted in the Ritz Theatre with a noon luncheon in the New Dimeling Hotel. Dr. DeMuth is assistant pro- fessor of surgery at the .School of Medicine, University of Penn- sylvania. institute is to be Football Scores By The Associated Presn Lock Haven 42, Danville 0 Central Dauphin 13, York 6 Cedar Cliff 27, Reading 18 Gettysburg 27, Big Spring 0 Hanover 54, Littlestown 27 Pottsville 27, West Hazleton 13 Our Lady of Lourdes 14, Le- banon Catholic 13 Lower Dauphin 14, Susque- hanna 7 Johnstown 28, Altoona 25 Northern Cambria 60, Cone- maugh Valley 14 Mount Lebanon 27, Baldwin 6 Cambria Heights 25, Windber 7 Berlin 13, Northern Maryland 6 Hollidaysburg 39, Huntingdon 7 Claysburg 0 Bedford 0 (tie) Initial plans for the Clearfield uled at the newspaper. By JOHN D. MCCLAIN County Child Welfare Services' Shapp was also invited by the WASHINGTON (AP) Space annual Christmas project were newspaper and quickly revised officials planned to transmit a reported on yesterday during the his schedule to visit it. signal early today designed to monthly luncheon meeting of the Shapp arrived first and ex send Lunar Orbitcr 1 crashing agency's advisory committee. changed cordial but brief greet- into the moon's hidden back- Mrs. Sara B. Jones, director ings with Shafer when they ac- side. of the Services, said that let- cidentally met m the circulation A spokesman for the National ters have been sent to county department. The cordiality end- Aeronautics and Space Admin- organizations and church groups ed there. istration said the craft's self- asking for their financial sup- Both made their separate destruction is necessary to elim- port. Each child under the agen- ways to the newsroom and inate possible interference with cy's care has also been sent a posed for pictures. the second Lunar Orbiler to be card asking him to list his first, A suggestion was made to launched Nov 6 The signal second and third choices for a hold a news conference and was to be flashed officials of Shapp quickly concurred. But Shafer appeared by the surprising turn of events and refused "I refuse to be a part of this grand stand he declared Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 1 Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 4 Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 1 Turn to Page 10, Col. 6 Please Turn to Page 2, Col. 5 Houtzdale Man Heads County Bank Group DUBOIS William Arnold Jr. is the new president of the Clearfield County Bankers' As- sociation, succeeding Ph i 1 i p Kearns Mr. Arnold, of the Bank, was named at the group's fall meeting held in the DuBois Country Club Thursday night. C. Wayne Bumbarger of the County National Bank of Clear- field was elected vice president and D. Edward Chaplin of the DuBois Deposit National Bank was named treasurer Guest speaker at the dinner meeting was W. K. Ulench, pub- lisher of The Progress, who spoke on Otocsin, the vast rec- reational complex planned in the Elliott State Park area. Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 7 FREE FOOTBALLS! SEE PAGE 4 FOR DETAILS County Democratic Rally Set Tuesday A Clearfield Countv Demo- cratic rally will be conducted in the Elementarv School Tuesday night Torn Con- ners, program director of WCPA Radio, as guest speaker. Mr. Conners will speak on the subject of "Democrats 66" al the 8pm meeting, accord ing to Ed L. "Pete" Fisher county Democratic chairman. The rally is being sponsored by the Bradford Township Dem ocralic Club Refreshments will be served the club Also slated to speak briefly are two of the candidates in this fall's campaign Edmund J. Zitzelbergsr of Clearfield. General Assembly, and Jo Havs of State College, State Senate. By GEORGE A. SCOTT Editor, The Progress "There's never been a doubt in my mind that we will win in South Viet Maj. Gen. William R. Peers, USA, told a, Clearfield audience last night as he presented a broad and comprehensive picture of the situation in that Asian nation and the United States' involve- ment there. The General, special assistant to the Joint Chiefs of Staff for counterinsurgency and special activities, addressed a disap- pointingly small audience at a meeting in the Clearfield Area High School auditorium sponsor' ed by John Lewis Shade Post 8 of the American Legion. Fewer than 250 persons, including Le- gionnaires and members of area Reserve and National Guard units, turned out for the pro- gram. Those who did attend, how- ever, were given a detailed and interesting picture of South Viet Nam, including its terrain, its people, governmental structure, the Viet Cong or communists, and the military forces that are fighting for South Viet Nam's freedom. The General showed two films, one dealing with fighting by the ground forces and the other by the U. S. Air Force, and answered questions from the audience. Although admitting that some of the criticisms of Americans concerning the conflict in South Viet Nam are true "to a degree but not to the extent indicated." Gen. Peers said emphatically that "the situation, both mil- itarily and on the civilian side, is vastly improved over what it was a year ago." He pointed out that a similar situation of unrest, political change and disagreement be- tween factions, along with an economic problem "exists in other emerging and indeed historically has been true Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 2 Inside The Progress Classified Ads g, 9 Hints From Hcloise 9 Comics 11 News From Around World 2 Sports 6, 7 Obituaries 10 Hospital News 2, 3 Editorial, Columns 4 Today in History 4 School News 12 Church News 5 World's Week 3 House Moving fosy for Him Trying to move a house? We know a powerful guy who can do it for you He's Mr Want Ad His latest feat of strength was per- formed for a Clearfield resident who told us- "I thought the phone started ringing before the paper even came out 1 had 20 more phone calls, and the ad ran only one dav." Clparfield: House, 4 rooms and hath. Race Strrct Ex- tension. Call 765 70fi3. To Bny, Sell, Rent, Trade, Use The Progress Classified Ads Phone Clearfield 765-5535 Or Tour Nearest Progrest Office. Beliefonte 28 Curwensvllle 12 DuBois 60 West Branch 33 Laurel Valley 19 Punxsy 43 State College 14 BEAHigh 25 Lewistown 21 Clearfield 7 Mo Valley 6 P-OHigh6 Bucktail Area 20 Purchase Line 0 Ford City 20 Tyrone High 6 Penns Valley 12 Chief Logan 7 SPAPFRI   

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