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Clearfield Progress: Wednesday, October 26, 1966 - Page 1

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   Progress, The (Newspaper) - October 26, 1966, Clearfield, Pennsylvania                               Ve-jCK- 43 Killed in Fire on U. S. Aircraft Carrier Ship Out Of Action Near Viet USS Oriskony Swtpt by Blaze In Tonkin Gulf By ROBERT TUCKMAN SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) Fire swept the U.S. air- craft carrier Oriskany off the North Vietnamese coast today, killing 43 of her officers and men, and putting the ship out of action, an American spokesman announced. Sixteen other men were injured seriously. The fire started a few hours before President Johnson made a flying visit to the big U.S. base at Cam Ranh Bay, 180 miles northeast of Saigon. Then he flew back to Manila. The fire broke out shortly aft- er dawn in a locker containing flares used for night illumina- tion and rescue work. The flames erupted on the hangar deck, just below the flight deck, and then spread, the Navy said. Two helicopters were de- stroyed by the blaze and an un- disclosed number of A4E Sky- hawk jet fighter-bombers were damaged. The Navy also reported exten- sive damages to ceilings and bulkheads of the car- rier, in the Gulf of Tonkin with two other U.S. carriers to launch strikes against North Viet Nam. Today's Chucltk If you can't get a lawyer who the. one who the judge.' THE PROGRESS Reader's Tip Tips for dter hunters Page 13. on .Vol. 60 No. 253 Our 56th Year Curweruville, Philipiburg, Moshonnon Valley, Pa., Wednesday, October 26, 1966 Copies Daily 28 PAGES TODAY Johnson Visits Viet Nam By FRANK CORMIER CAM RANH BAY, South Viet Nam (AP) President John- son, who likes surprises and drama, made a top-secret flight to this war zone bastion today and told the American fighting men here: "We depend on you." Johnson spent two hours and 24 minutes on Vietnamese soil. He capped his historic visit by exhorting Gen. William C. West- moreland and his top field com- manders to "come home with that coonskin on the wall." The President got closer to an actual battlefield than any pres- ident since Abraham Lincoln. Johnson ate with the troops, visited with the wounded, pinned medals on the brave, signed scores of autographs, shook hundreds of hands and delivered an emotional speech. Several thousand of the 000 U.S. troops in Viet Nam are based here. Men in battle dress grinned broadly and cheered lustily as Johnson moved among them both on foot and standing erect in a jeep, grasping a roof brace to steady himself in the vehicle. The soldiers, who got almost no advance notice of Johnson's visit, sometimes appeared at a loss about how to react. Some seemed to think he should be treated like a general until he extended his hand. Then they rushed forward, al- most like any street-corner crowd back home. But, there was an undertone of discipline and decorum. On his arrival the President said: "I came here today for one good reason: Simply because I could not come to this part of the world and not come to see you. "I came here today for one good purpose, to tell you and through you to tell every sol- dier, sailor, airman and Marine in Viet Nam how proud we are of what you are doing and how proud we are of the way-you are doing it. "I came here today with only one regret: That I could not begin to personally thank every man in Viet Nam for what he is doing. I wish very much that I could visit every battalion, ev- ery squadron, every bhip." The President continued: "You know what you are fighting for: To give the Viet- namese people a chance to build a kind of nation that they want free from terror, free from intimidation, free from fear. "I do not have to tell you that this is a tough battle. But from the first day you have shown that you are up to the job. "Make no mistake about it: The American people who you serve are proud of you. There are some who may disagree with what we are doing here, but that is not the way most of us feel and act when freedom and the nation's security are in danger. "We in America depend on you, on the young and on the brave to stop aggression before it sweeps forward. For then it must be stopped by larger sac- rifice and a heavier cost." Johnson left Manila secretly in midafternoon, and headed rack there after dark. No offi- cial announcement of his trip was made until he was back in the Philippines. A fighter escort accompanied the presidential jet part of the way from the Philippines to Viet Nam. While Johnson was here he was guarded by only eight Secret Service agents an unu- sually small number. When one agent tried to get into a jeep with Johnson and Gen. Westmoreland a routine Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 1 Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 5 Time Changed For Parade at Houtzdale HOUTZDALE A change of time for the Halloween Parade to be held here tomorrow has been announced by the Houtz- dale Businessmen's Association. It was originally planned to start at but has been chang- ed to 7 o'clock. Along with floats, there will be four bands. Treats will be given to youngsters of the area at the Fire Hall after the pa- rade. Large Turnout Urged for Viet Program Friday "As president of the Clearfield Chamber of Commerce, I want to urge the people of this area to take advantage of the op- portunity given them by the Clearfield American Legion to see and hear the outstanding program on Viet Nam that will be presented in the Clearfield Area High School auditorium at 9 o'clock Friday Robert B. Myers said today. "It is through such programs that, we can keep informed on important worldwide events, and particularly one as vital to America as Viet he stat- ed. "The Legion is very fortu- nate in having a man like Maj. Gen. W. R. Peers come to Clearfield for this presentation. His experience and background qualify him for this subject. We hope that the American Le- gion will have the complete sup- port of the people of the area in this Houtzdale Man, 72, Held for Murder Steve Beseda Charged Of Howard Crowley Steve Beseda, a 72-year-old unemployed Houtzdale miner, is in the Clearfield County Jail charged with the fatal shooting of Howard Crowley, 50, of Bris- bin. Beseda was arrested by State Police yesterday a little more than 24 hours after Crowley's body had been found lying on the livingroom floor of the home. An autopsy revealed that Crowley had been shot through the chest. He also had a wound on this head which appeared to have been caused by a blow cording to Deputy Coroner Wil- liam W. Strange. District Attorney John K. Reil- ly Jr. said this morning that Be- seda made a statement to State Police following his arrest. He declined, however, to say wheth- er or not it was in the nature of a confession. Beseda was arraigned last night before Justice of the Peace Harry Ganoe at Clearfield on a charge of murder. A hearing is scheduled for late Monday after- noon. The defendant is being rep- in Slaying at Brisbin from a blunt instrument, ac- resented by a court-appointed attorney, Thomas F. Morgan of Clearfield. It has not been revealed when the murder took place, although it is known to have occurred several days before the body was found. The victim, who was estrang- ed from his wife, lived alone. Police broke into his padlocked house about noon Monday and found him dead. They had been called to the scene after neigh- bors had failed to see Crowley for several days. As Drive Hears Goal... Crash Cleanup Started by UF An all-out "Whirlwind Windup" campaign will be stag- ed tomorrow and Friday in an effort to reach the Clearfield Area United Fund's goal of and thui strengthen Clearfisld's claim for "All American City" honors. This was decided yeiterday at the final official report luncheon of United Fund workers in the New Dimeling Hotel ot which a total of in new pledges and cash con- tributions was reported. This boosted the overall fund total Bruised Waring Group Resumes Annual Tour By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PITTSBURGH, but not battered, musician Fred Waring hopes to gather his troops here today and resume the annual six-month tour of the famed "Pennsylvanians." Waring was hopeful of keeping a scheduled date tomorrow night in Chambersburg, Pa., even though 12 of his perform- ers were left in hospitals from a bus accident Tuesday on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. A state trooper surveying the accident scene about 14 miles east of Somerset, Pa., and some 70 miles east of Pittsburgh, said: "They were pretty lucky. No one was killed." But Waring, celebrating his 50th year in show business, was hardly phased. "Mr. Waring is in real fine shape and taking things real to just short of the campaign goal. The volunteer solicitors have a double objective in their cam- paign windup effort to secure the full amount needed to fi- nance the 1967 programs of 13 vital health, welfare and youth organizations serving the Clear- field area and its citizens and to add another important argu- ment for consideration of Clear- field as an All-American City by the judges of Look magazine and the National Municipal League. It was announced a week ago today that Clearfield is one of 22 communities in the United States in the running for Please Turn to Page 18, Col 3 ACCUSED MURDERER State Police Detectives Edward Kerr, at left, and Kenneth Bundy, take 72-year-old Steve Beseda of Houtzdale to the Clearfield County Jail after state police arrested him yesterday for the murder of 50-year-old Howard C. Crowley of Brisbin. Beseda is scheduled for a hearing Monday. (Progress Photo) AT MURDER SCENE Authorities check the window through which the body of Howard C. Crowley, 50, of Brisbin, was spotted by Woodward Township Police Chief Earl Vogle Monday afternoon as a probe of the murder continued yester- day. From left are Houtzdale Police Chief John Kashtock, Deputy Coroner William W. Strange and Chester Hill Police Chief Lyle Fowler. (Progress Photo) Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 6 Winners Announced For Economy Days The lucky holder of orange ticket No. 11440 is the winner of the awarded by the Clear- field Merchants Association dur- ing the three-day Economy Day Sales that ended Monday. Cash awards of each will also be awarded to shoppers holding these tickets: Yellow: ?92920, 276873, 294981, 269112, 294918; White: 070203, 072346, 071330, 066041; Orange: MH527, 142W: Red: 85477, M598; Green: 126023, Gray: 54942, 54639; Purple: 057943; Brown: 074531. Winners of the cash prizes have until Nov. 30 to claim them in the Clearfield Chamber of Commerce office. Fair and cool with scat- tered frost tonight, low 28 to 35. Sunny and season- ably mild Thursday. Sunrise Clearfield River Level Tuesday 7 p. m. 4.90 feet Today 7 a. m. 4.90 feet (station- Clearfield Weather Tuesday low 30; High 70; Overnight low 32. Mid State Airport Tuesday low 25; High 59; Overnight low 23. Shafer Lists His Goals For Pennsylvania HARRISBURG (AP) Re- publican gubernatorial nominee Raymond P. Shafer outlined his goals for Pennsylvania Tuesday night while the man he hopes to succeed ran interference against the opposition. "I want to lead the most comprehensive program of mar- shaling human resources ever undertaken in any Shafer told enthusiastic Republi- cans at a -a-plate dinner Gov. Scranton, who roused the crowd of to a stand- ing ovation, devoted much of hi.-, speech to making his Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 8 County COP Cains Ground In Registration Republicans are continuing their slow but steady climb toward voter supremacy in Clearfield County but the Demo- crats still will go into next month's election clinging to the lead by the slim margin of 176 voters. The GOP narrowed the gap from a spread of 565 last spring while at the same time the Democrats were increasing their over-all strength from members to Reg- istered Republicans now num- County Group Backs Plan On U. S. Contest Shapp Charges GOP Smear Campaign By VINCENT P. CAROCCI PITTSBURGH (AP) Demo- crat Milton Shapp flew into Pittsburgh today, charging that a "smear campaign against his credibility and reputation was all that the Republicans had left "The Republican campaign from here on out will be one of fear, smear and hysteria in an attempt to attack my credibility and vilify my Shapp said as he prepared for another grueling day of campaigning. "They started it Monday night on television and they'll keep it Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 7 Inside The Progress Ads 1? Hints From Hekttae 21 Comics 27 Prom Around World 18 Satwrtg 12, 13 Obituaries is Hecpital 2 Editorial, 4 Setlal 3, M ber Both parties made substan- tial gains in new registrations during pre-election membership drives that found the GOP pick- ing up 533 new voters and the Democrats 335. Figures released recently by the County Board of Elections show the total number of coun- ty voters to be up slightly over the pre-primary With the support of the Clear- totals, field County Development Coun- Republicans and Democrats cil the borough of Clearfield is combined account for all hut producing a film to present its 316 of this total. The balance story at the final judging of the is comprised of: Probitition 25. Ail-American City contest. Socialist 4, Independent 146 and At a Council meeting held at Non-ParUsan 141. Clearfield last night a motion Meanwhile, statewide was passed to increase the in- tration totals show the Demo- dusrrial budget by to crats holding a slight voter cover production of the film. edge, to A The Clearfield Chamber of complete county by county Commerce will contribute breakdown: to ,the Council and rest of the County Rep Dem Other money will be provided by the Adams 393 state in its matching fund pro- Philipsburg-Osceola School District Tax Due Before Tuesday PHILIPSBURG Residents of the Philipsburg-Osceola Area School District area were re- minded this week by Charles B. Mills, receiver of school taxes, that the occupation tax for each employed resident is in force and should be paid be- fore next Tuesday to avokl pay- ment of interest and penalties. The local school district is Pleast Turn to Page 8, Col. 3 Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 4 Page 8, Col. 4 School Board Airs Proposed Salaries AMESVILLE The Moshan- non Valley School Board held a special meeting last night to discuss the salary schedule pre- sented recently by the faculty- After airing the proposed salary schedule at length, the board took action to seek fur- ther information from the teach- ers regarding years of service and other items. Announcement was made that the regular November meeting will he held Nov. 9, one day lat- er than usual because of Election Day. Progress Filmstrip Studies 'Cities, U.S.A.' During the Senate hearings on big city problems August, Los Angeles Mayor Samuel Yorty glared across the table at Sen. Robert F. Kennedy of New York and snapped, "I don't need a lecture from you on how to run my city." It was a tense moment in the proceedings during which Kennedy and Chairman Sen. Abraham Ribicoff of cut questioned the leaders of eight U. S. cities on their most pressing urban problems. ----------------______________. Susquehanna Basin Compact Progress Noted By JOHN KOENIG JR. AP Regional Service WASHINGTON (AP) De- spite some opposition, an inter- state compact for preservation and development of the Susque- hanna River Basin should be ready for presentation to Con- gress next year, an official said Wednesday. If the compact is acted upon favorably next year a Susque- hanna RLver Basin Commission could be staffed and made ready to start operating by 1968 said William Voigt Jr director of Hie Interstate Advisory Com- Pleasc Turn to Page 18, Col. 4 FREE FOOTBALLS! Clearly, our cities are in trouble. Urban problems run a full gamut in nearly every me- tropolis: slums, crime, air and water pollution, overcrowding, over-taxation. And if current population predictions come true, our problems are going to set worse. This situation is spotlighted in "Cities, U S the second pro- gram in the Special Report filmstrip series being made available by The Progress as a public service to the junior and senior high classes of the Clear- field, Curwensville, Glcndale, Harmony, Moshannon Valley. Philipsburg Osceola, West Branch and St. Francis schools More than students already have seen "Cities U.S A." in the Please Turn to Page 18, Col. 1 Flushing of Wafer Mains Announced WOODLAND The Woodland- Bigler Area Authority announced today that water mains in the Woodland and Mineral Springs areas will be flushed beginning tomorrow at noon and again possibly Friday at noon. The flushing could result in cloudy water to customers in these areas. Planning Program In Curwensville Area Outlined for Lions CURWENSVILLE Progress toward a long-range planning program for the CurwensvUle area was outlined before the Cur- wensville Lions Club Monday night following a dinner meeting in the Methodist Church. O. Clifford Terbush, planning consultant for Clifton M. Rodg- ers Associates, a Hamsbursc firm, told club members of his firm's accomplishment's thus far in formulating recommendations over an 18-month period for the continued social, economic and recreational development of the community. The annual Lions Club Hallow- Please Turn to 18, Coi. 7 IN FW SPA PERI SEE PAGE 21 FOR DETAILS NEWSPAPER!   

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