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Clearfield Progress Newspaper Archive: September 28, 1966 - Page 1

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Publication: Clearfield Progress

Location: Clearfield, Pennsylvania

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   Progress, The (Newspaper) - September 28, 1966, Clearfield, Pennsylvania                               Today's Chuckto you hear about the Hol- lywood youtif who was very proud because he bad ihost at the P-TA meeting? THE PROGRESS toacfor's Tip 'The Way It Must Have Been' is tonight's editorial heading. Read it on Page 4. Philiptburg, Moihonnon Volley, Pa., September 28, 1966 Copies Daily 36 PAGES TODAY NEARING COMPLETION This is new Route 153 in Lawrence Township as it passes through the valley toward the Rockton Mountain. This stretch of the four- highway leads into the old intersection of Routes 153 and 410 in the background. Almost all of the construction work has been completed but crews still have to fill in the medial strip with top soil. Good wea- ther permitting, it is expected that the new road will be open to traffic in November. The new highway starts at the intersection of the Front and Nichols streets at Clearfield. (Progress Photo) On Consumer Credit, Menial Health... Two Key Bills Near Final Vote in Senate By VINCENT P. CAROCCI HARRISBURG (AP) The Senate moved toward a final vote today on what op- Testimony Begins In Yount Trial By BETTY HAMILTON Progress SUM Writer The horror-filled screams of a bereaved mother filled the Clearfield County courtroom this morning as Mrs. Douglas Rimer of Luthersburg R. D. faced Jon E. Yount, the accused slayer and rapist of her 18-year- old daughter. The emotional outburst by the slender, attractive Mrs. Rimer came, shortly after she had ta- ken the witness stand as the Commonwealth's second wit- ness. As she described the concern she had experienced when her daughter, Pamela Sue. failed to return home immediately after school on the evening of April To Curwensville Rotary Report Given On Planning Progress CURWENSVILLE A thought-provoking presentation on the progress being made in preparation of a far- reaching planning program for the Curwensville area was given to members of the Rotary Club last night. Addressing the group was G. Clifford Terbush, a plan- ning consultant for Clifton M. Rodgers and Associates, the Harnsburg firm that has been employed by the Curwens- ville Planning Commission with the sanction of Borough nation. Also in position for a final vote is a comprehensive mental health plan proposing the establishment of regional mental health centers to care for persons suffering from minor mental problems. The fiercely contested consumer credit bill, an amended version of one passed by the Democratic controlled House, was reported back from the Senate Banking Com- mittee late Tuesday night. Guardsmen Help To Quell Riots In California By JACK SCHREIBMAN and AUSTIN SCOTT SAN FRANCISCO censed because a white police- man kiDed a Negro youngster fleeing a stolen car, rioting Ne- County Agency Planned For Care at Home Council. The 18-month program will be completd by November 1967 Sidelights Of Trial Prothonotary Archie Hill was surprised Monday morning when he called the roll of pros- pective jurors to have a male voice answer to the name of "Mae Weaver." The owner of the voice said the name was "Mac" not "Mae." When Pro- thonotary Hill insisted it was "Mae Hoover" who had been called for jury duty and that she lived at 714 Maple Ave.. the reply came back, "That's where I live and I've never seen her." The matter was straightened 28, Mrs. Rimer looked in the di- rection of the defense table and seeing Yount, burst into hysteri- cal screams. A recess was immediately called and as state police start- ed to assist Mrs. Rimer from the courtroom, she fought them off crying, "I won't walk past him No, no." Yount, who sat quietly through- out the outburst, was led from the room and Mrs. Rimer was removed through another exit to an anteroom where she was quieted. She resumed the stand about a half hour later but was trem- bling and fighting off tears as she completed her testimony. Yount also appeared affected by what had happened in the courtroom. Although he main- tained the same calm appear- ance he has had since the trial opened Monday, he kept his head lowered and rubbed his hand across his forehead sev- eral times. The Commonwealth opened its case this morning with District the beginning for Curwensville, Mr. Terbush said. He emphasized that continuous planning will be necessary to make the master plan worth- while, but even more important will be public acceptance. "The success of any plan depends on ing the argument. It was for- tunate Mr. Weaver wasn't dis- qualified because of a typo- graphical error for he be- came the first juror accepted for duty. A new Clearfield County agen- the support of the people who cy is in the process of being or- are guided by he declared. A ganized to help homemakers With the use of various maps, one of its and persons needing home he gave Rotarians a picture of The Yount trial is attracting more attention throughout the state than past murder trials. has munity Action in Clearfield County Inc. at Clearfield yes- plans were discussed for semi-public, multi-use and mul- The borough is comprised of acres of land 766 acres Twenty-one persons represent state or 51-8 Per cent of which vacant. Of and heard an ex- planation of the program from hripkTnp m s sa e bricks Tuesday night m two San Mrs. Hannah Geisel, program Pattern is not really bad al- specialist, Economic Develop- though at present there is no U y V C III UCl 1.ITO I IF im but, in reality, it will just be ?ut with Prothonotary Hill los- Attorney John K. Reilly asking LU- incr T. tne jurors iast o{ wnoni were selected yesterday after- noon to find the 28-year-old DuBois Area High School teach- er guilty of both first degree murder and rape. He said the Commonwealth will prove that Yount offered Pamela Sue one of his pupils in an accelerated math class Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 7 28 Vietnamese Are Killed In Bombing Error By ROBERT TUCKMAN SAIGON, South Viet Nam U. S. Marine bomb- trial from start to finish and other city newspapers and wire are on the case. If bets were laid on how it would take to pick a there must have been a 1, losers. Judging from the two murder trials it was c the be time, Debate Costs, Financing... Candidates Clash Over Education By LAWRENCE MARGASAK PHILADELPHIA (AP) The Democratic and Republican gubernatorial candidates spoke and debated from the same ________ platform Tuesday night, with their conflicting views on cost ard c- president of Wana- -f makers Department Store. there ha_s no racial vio- ment of Commerce.' In spite of an eleventh-hour knee, andjumped hours later Those attending generally fight by prominent Philadelphia five across the city to the agreed on the need for such a retailers, the measure contained Fillmore District, where a near program and tentatively set an- provision limiting the maxi- was suppressed last sum- other meeting for Oct. 20, at mer after a Negro patrolman which time a rough draft of a stopped Negro youths from rob- program will be worked out bing two white couples. Gov. Edmund G. Brown called up National Guardsmen 0 however, there opposed to However, he did :urors .was that many of them err H Particularly mothers of teen- lag Please Turn to 10, ag.e daughters said a mum interest charge on any credit sale to 15 per cent a year. The 15 per cent limit was strongly objected to by the A committee was named to work on preliminary proposals for the program. It consists of tailers who wanted an 18 per Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 2 Please Turn to Page 10, Col. S "This bill is toughest of any _ bill for retailers in the United TOIIIOrrOW dt States to live said Rich- County Man Named HARRISBURG The State Senate has confirmed unani- mously the appointment of Dan i _i R. Morgan of Houtzdale, Clear- mSiaC 1116 their UP ou d Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 7 and methods of financing education a prime topic "We will be able to handle most of the cost within the present tax said Republican Raymond P. Shafer. But Democrat Milton Shapp disagreed, contending that Pennsylvanians are "already overtaxed, based upon their earnings." Ttte candidates an s w e r e d then rebutted each other's an- swers, before some 500 persons at a dinner meeting of the Golden Slipper Square Club here. Earlier, both men spoke individually to the group. Shapp, during the question- and-answer repeated his Safe Will Mark Event At Raub Store Enlargement of the Thrift Bargain Department and com 'What will happen is that we'll give less and less he told newsmen. The complaints, however, were not enough to prevent the bill from reaching the floor. "The caucus has instructed PIDA Presents Reports Due On Check For United Fund Drive Target Share Sen. Rowland B. hi t f u tirst reports of campaign workers are Mahany. R-Crawford, chairman n P a Dutch TreaV' luncheon in of the Banking Committee, told Hotel. The luncheon is scheduled for noon. Bond. Campaign Chairman John H. Jackson and Vice Chair- o e Mahany said in a statement: mon RalPh J- Kane are hopeful that last Thursday's ad- of Commerce, for part "The amendments reported vance gift and pre-campaign solicitation report of 758 f th on the addition the Senate Banking Commit- wi" be more than doubled at tomorrow's lunch ,Target plant ______ __ Pennsylvania Industrial Devel- opment Authority has been pre- sented to the Clearfield Founda- tion, financial arm of the Chamber of Commerce, for part were capital leading reasons for rejecting dropped 500-pound bombs by them error Tuesdav on a friendly vil-_ ti _, jiage jjy Vietnamese forces and their families. A U.S. military spokesman said the mistake bombing killed 28 soldiers and civilians and wounded 17. The bombs also wrecked about 100 huts in the village in the northern province of Quang Ngai, 350 miles north of Saigon. The U.S. Command also dis- closed that American troops have launched four new search- and-destroy operations and are operating in the Mekong Delta for the first time in the Viet Nam war. Until now the huge delta rice bowl much of it now under deep flood waters has been an area of operations solely for South Vietnamese troops. Only light contact with the enemy was reported in the four new operations, which were launched earlier this month but were not announced until today. In other war developments, a SPORTS EDITOR Fred Kavelak has chat with area football coaches. Read Kave- lak's Korner on Page 16. Classified Ads 22, 23 Hints From Heloise 25 Comics 35 News From Around World 10 Sports is, 17 Obituaries g Hospital News 8, 18 Editorial, Columns 4 Social News 3, 6, 11, 14, 24, 26 Today in History 4 School News 35 Church News is State News Briefs ..7... 5 For Radio Operators 34 Harrisburg News.....8, 19 Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 3 bv the Senate Banking Commit tee flrmly establlsh the ceiling sale days in the J. S. Raub announced today by Al store manager. Shafer contended would cost miUion in interest in the first vear shapp shot back (Q buying at the the nation." took th( which called which kicked off the iqn of 092 for a snapp snot back that to reach Pieasp Turn in pacrP in rni i Free souvenirs will be given the million figure cited by 4 to each person visiting the store during this special event, which begins Thursday and continues through Saturday. Attractive and valuable free gifts will also be given with every purchase made during Shafer, a billion program would be required for one year. He said his program would cost from billion to billion over the next 10 years. In his speech, the Democratic nominee called Shafer the Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 3 Please Turn to Page 11, Col. 3 Trade Magazine... Operation ESTAK Gets Nationwide Publicity Operation ESTAK (Educational Supplies to An Khe) which was sponsored by The Progress and Radio WCPA re- ceived nationwide publicity last week through an article in Editor Publisher, national trade magazine of the news- paper industry. Under the headline "Pennsylvania Pencils In Viet School writer George Wilt of Editor Publisher devoted a column and a half to the project through which area resi- dents contributed cash and school supplies for a school for South Vietnamese children. The project was suggested as a result of an article written for The Progress by Captain Rob- art M. Sheriff of Chester Hill, .-----------------------------..._________ U. S. advisor to the South Vietnamese at An Khe. Mr. Wilt's article related how money was raised by children holding carnivals, collecting money door-to-door and celling merchandise, by the high school Key Club's car wash and the Both Sides File Briefs in Rail Merger Plan NEW YORK rep- resenting both sides were filed Tuesday on the deadline for ar- guments in the controversy over the proposed merger of the New York Central and the Pennsyl- vania Railroad. level in tions and major sions and represented sclici- tations in advance of the kick- tf "All of the campaign divi- sions have been hard at work since last Thursday and we feel certain that they will come up with a good increase in the campaign total tomorrow." Messrs. Jackson and Kane said today. "We have been hearing t A should glve us a big toward our goal tomol> bv Bob ,rtWe ciSn ta -iT r. x crash, and JF story is being carried directly to employes of major The merger was supposed to arfa' lake place Sept. 30, but a three- Prcsenting the UP story have judge court last week lemporar- bcen bue.fore emPIo-ve ily restrained the merger pend- a.1 Walker ing a study to determine if an Co. by Georfie A. injunction should be issued ri Hammakcr. against the plan. Clear-Don Manufacturing Co. Opposition briefs against the y Theodore Thompson injunction were filed by Connecti- cut, Massachusetts and the city of Philadelphia. Those in favor of an injunction were filed by the smaller eastern railroads and cities and town- ships that claim they would be harmed by the merger. Meanwhile, in Washington, the Justice Department said it was neutral in the court attempts to delay the proposed merger. A department spokesman said, "Since the merger has already been the subject of lengthy pro- ceedings, beginning in and since eventual approval of the merger was unanimous, the de- partment is taking no position on the pending requests for fur- Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 7 FREE FOOTBALLS! Please Turn to Page 8, Col. S Pkase Turn to Page 8, Col., a SEE PAGE 34 FOR DETAILS Partly cloudy and cool tonight, low in the 40s. Considerable cloud iness with occasional light rain and a little temperature change Thursday. Sunrise Sunset Clearfield River Level Tuesday 7 p. m. 5.25 feet Today 7 a. m. 5.35 feet Clearfield Weather Tuesday low 44; High 64; Overnight low 50. Mid State Airport Tuesday low 33; High 49; Overnight low 46. Five Day Forecast Sept. 29-Oct. 3-. Tem- peratures are expected to average eight to 11 de- grees below normal highs of 67 to 70 and lows of 47 to 50, It will be very cool throughout the period, with only minor day-to-day temperature changes. Rainfall will average one- half to three-quarters of an inch as showers Thurs- day and again during the weekend. project, which more than dou- bled the size of the plant. The addition cost In addition to the PIDA funds, the three area banks (Curwensville Slate Bank, County National Bank and Clearfield Trust Company) shared 50 per cent Please Turn to Page 11, Col. 1 Liquid Fuel Payment OK'd for Rush Twp. PHILIPSBURG A liquid fuel tax payment of was authorized for Rush Town- ship Monday by the Centre County Commissioners. The Commissioners, during their regular business meeting, also voted to seek bids for fur- niture for the reception room and the secretary's office in the Judge's chamber. The furni- ture is part of the original order authorised by the board for Courthouse furniture. In Clearfield County Brochures Promote Fall Foliage, Bridge In conjunction with its fall promotion program the Clear- field County Development Council is distributing two bro- chures designed to attract tourists. One is the annual Fall Foliage brochure, a four-color folder which invites visitors to "see Clearfield County's mil- l.on acres of spectacular foliage." The brochure con- tains a mop of the county with special emphasis on ten tourist attractions. Two Cars Damaged PHILIPSBURG Damage totalled yesterday when two cars collided at 9 a. m. at the intersection of Maple and Water streets. There were injuries. Police Chief Victor Fleck re- ported that Mrs. Ali< 64, stopped at a stop then pulled out. Her car col- Catnphill, 27, of Osceolt who was headed east on Maple Street. These attractions include the state parks, the McGees Mills Covered Bridge. Bilger's Rocks, the county Historical Museum, the Cherry Tree Monument, and Lake Rene. The second brochure is a special one on the McGees Mills Covered Bridge. This four color folder is being distributed now to coincide with Pennsylvania Cov- ered Bridge Week, Oct. 8-lfi In other matters at the month- ly Council meeting held last night at Clearfield, tho board was told that a matching fund agreement for industrial promo- tion has been approved by the Department of Commerce. Lar- ry Anesco of State College, a no department representative, told the board that the state has al- lowed the Council in match funds for 1966-67. to current tourist proj. by Dr. Walter P. Thorp of Clear- field on his Otocsin Forest Ride. The three-day event, conducted by Dr. Thorp during the Moun- car at Clearfield Kiwanians Elect David Gallaher As 1967 President David Gallaher was elected president of the Clearfield Ki- wams Club for 1967 at the an- nual election of officers held during the club's regular dinner meeting in the New Dimehng Hotel last night. He will succeed John K. Rcilly Jr. in January. Other officers named were: Jack Lanagcr, first vice presi- dent; Robert Baum, second vice president; Harry E. Mann, treasurer; and William Haz- zard. Dr. John Kennard, Jay Master and Joseph MoHica, di- rectors. The club heard a talk on the current United Fund campaign by Gilbert Frame. President Reilly announced that the club's annual spaghetti supper at the S.O.I. Hall to raise funds for Please Turn to Page 8, Col. 8 15. INEWSPAPERif NEWSPAPER!   

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