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Clearfield Progress Newspaper Archive: August 9, 1966 - Page 1

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Location: Clearfield, Pennsylvania

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   Clearfield Progress (Newspaper) - August 9, 1966, Clearfield, Pennsylvania                                Today's Chuckle "Just a trim," the teenage boy told the barber. "You can even it up a little around the .shoulders." The Progress Reader's Tip For a report on activity at Harrisburg, turn to Page 9. Vol. 60 - No. 187 Our 56th Year Clearfield, Curwensville, Philipsburg, Moshannon Valley, Pa.,  Tuesday, August 9, 1966 15,155 Copies Daily 36 PAGES TODAY Totals $1.53 Billion... Late NeWS ^ore *'M", ^ Aircraft Fly Missions... Bulk of Pa. Budget Due for Approval HARRISBURG (AP) - The House unanimously adopted a conference committee report today proposing a $1,259,035. 436 general appropriations bill to finance 90 per cent of regular state spending in the new fiscal year which began last July 1. The vote was 202-0. hitch, the Republican Senate and bulk of a $1.53 billion state budget HARRISBURG (AP) - Barring an unforeseen Democratic House are expected to adopt today the for the new fiscal year which began in July. A conference committee report, proposing a $1,259,035,436 general appropriations bill to finance 90 per cent of regular spending, was submitted to both chambers Monday,   thus   ending   a   stalemate   on   the budget that has lasted more than three ----------- months. The dispute began when House Democrats, instead of accepting the tradtional single appropriation bill to cover spending, introduced 200 - odd appropriation bills. This, they claimed, would give them more control over executive spending. The budget report was approved by the Democratic majority caucus in the House and Republicans in the Senate. Leaders said they would call it to a vote today. In addition, another $120 million in appropriations to universities, hospitals and other state-aided instititulions were advanced Monday into position for a final vote in the Senate. Senate Democrats, however, threatened to hold back the necessary votes for passage of these measures unless another $8 million was provided for the college scholarship program. Senate Minority Whip William J. Lane, D - Washington, said the Democrats would caucus on their course of action before the session. At least six Democratic votes are necessary for passage since the money for the schools and other state - aided institutions requires two - thirds approval of the 50 - member chamber. Republicans have only 28 voles. In addition to the general appropriations measure and the $120 million in non - preferred appropriations, the six - man budget conference committee proposed to allocate $7,083,334 this year for the community mental health retardation program, now before the legislature. The budget settlement weathered a last - minute threat Monday when House Appropriations Chairman Martin P. Mullen decided to forego another prolong- Improvements Under Way ... Curwensville Council Gets Irvin Park Report CURWENSVILLE - Weather permitting and with the right amount of volunteer labor, improvements to the dam at the Irvin Park swimming area should be completed within the week. In a report to Curwensville Borough Council at a special meeting last night, Councilman Harry Fye said the dam has been reinforced and repaired from the beach to the concrete - pier. Work was to resume today on the other side of the pien Councilman Fye also reported that WASHINGTON (AP) - President Johnson said today that in Viet Nam "I don't see any change for the worse at all" and at home things arc going "reasonably well" on holding the line against inflation. Johnson told a news conference that weekend plane losses and casualties in Viet Nam were not unexpected. 3 U. S. Planes Down As Air Activity Intensifies Airline Strike Pact Prospects At 'Zero' Level By EDMOND LE BRETON ^ WASHINGTON (AP) - The House Commerce Committee calls top union and management negotiators as witnesses today, confronted by a "ceiling zero, visibility zero" forecast on prospects of settling the month-old airlines strike at the bargaining table. The committee has before it a Senate-passed resolution that would order the 35.000 striking members of the AFL-CIO International Association of Machinists back to their jobs on five major airlines for up to 180 days.' Committee members predict some form of, the measure will be sent to the. House floor by the end of the week. Scheduled to testify today were Union President P. L. Siemiller and chief airline negotiator William J. Curtin. At the urging of the committee, negotiators met for nearly eight hours Monday in the first facc-to-faee session since the strikers rejected 10 days ago a tentative settlement reached under White House auspices. When Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz adjourned the talks Monday night, he said he had no present plan for further a portion of the beach was extended upstream and the new part eventually will be covered with sand. At his suggestion Council approved the installation of a three-inch concrete capping over the main walkway on both sides of the pier. The sloping ramp will be covered with limestone. Volunteers will be welcome every evening this week from 6 to 8:30 o'clock. Mr. Fye said, in expressing hope that the project could be completed by Friday. A matter which has been hanging fire for some time - codification of ordinances - also came in for considerable discussion before Council decided against having the work done by a publishing house for a sizable fee. Instead, Council decided it could undertake the project itself since it is merely a clerical matter and complete it over a period of time at a minimum expense. Some time ago Council was informed that roots of trees along Meadow Street were .getting into sewers and causing water problems in basements in that area. A contract was awarded recently to a firm to remove the trees but since has met with DuBois Council, Highway Dept. Pact Predicted DUBOIS - Negotiations between the City of DuBois and the Pennsylvania Department of Highways regarding construction of a filtration plant in the DuBois watershed may produce an agreement by the end of this week. DuBois City Council last night instructed City Solicitor Edward Cherry to request a continuance inary objection of the city toon a court hearing scheduled Thursday to discuss the prelim-wards a declaration of taking filed in March by the Highway Department. The declaration was filed to acquire right-of-way for Sections 25 and 26 of the Keystone Short-way through the city watershed. In filing the objection, Council maintained that a filtration plant had to be built on the site before Shortway construction began. Mr. Cherry said today he was instructed to contact the Highway Department and arrange a By PETER AltNETT SAIGON, South Vict Nam (AP) - North Viet Nam's antiaircraft defenses knocked down three more U.S. planes Monday as American jets pounded the Communist north with a record 139 combat missions. Ten American places have been lost over North Viet Nam since Sunday. .More than 300 planes probably took part in the assault, since a mission may involve three or four planes. But a U.S. spokes- man said there had been other days on which more planes had been sent against the north although on fewer missions The three planes lost Monday were all Air Force Thimderchief fighter-bombers, the U.S. command said. Two were shot down 60 miles northwest of Hanoi. The third was hit 55 miles northwest of Dong Hoi. Only one pilot was rescued, and two are missing. Five of the seven planes lost Sunday were Thunderchiefs. Six are missing from those pilots raids. As the North Vietnamese brought the number of U.S. planes lost above the J7th Parallel to 329, the ground war picked up in South Viet Nam. US Marines battled a North Vietnamese company through the night near the demilitarized zone and other American troops tracked a battered Communist battalion in the central highlands after it mauled a U.S. 1st Cavalry (Airmobile) Company. Reports from the highland battleground said the cavalrymen counted at least 85 enemy dead and estimated at least 100 more were killed by U.S. air and artillery fire. The fighting was accompanied by a sudden spurt in helicopter losses. Nine U.S. Army and Marine choppers were casualties Monday. Two crashed and burned west of the highland town  of  Plciku,   while   seven Please Turn to Page 10, Col. 2 SlT!!Pr09re8s! Jacobs Resigns Hints From Heloise ____ 12 . � � Sw".^.,vor,i.:? ^S Technical  Obituaries ........ ...... 2 f f     f-v  I asT,.. i Schoo  Director Social News        ........ 12 � � w w �       --   �      
                            

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