Clearfield Progress, February 21, 1966, Page 23

Clearfield Progress

February 21, 1966

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Issue date: Monday, February 21, 1966

Pages available: 24

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Publication name: Clearfield Progress

Location: Clearfield, Pennsylvania

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All text in the Clearfield Progress February 21, 1966, Page 23.

Clearfield Progress (Newspaper) - February 21, 1966, Clearfield, Pennsylvania THEMOGRESS, CWltld, Curwensvill,, Phillpshura. Meshonnen Volley, Pa., Monday, February 21, 1966 PAGE TWENTYTHWI STEVE CANYON 00 HOT FEApJI ma'am! this 15 aw house.' san-Ho is aw wipe' By MILTON CAN IFF 5an-rl3 HAS TKAINBP^^ VOU UEZO NOT VOU WEt-L, WT a5-I SPEAK j WHEN APPROACHES I HEAfifP MY WIFE AND VOU MUTTE* -IN J CHIUP CC?ME IS BWOLISH lAflS^/iL enough TALK, MICKEY FINN By LANK LEONARD COULD/ '4 BLONOIE By CHIC YOUNG 4 rtO-'I always ao owlins RlSMT aftm work; OM MONPAiV, 3J 2-: By CHESTER GOULD 1 WHAT WAS\thats maav THATF ) AND His NEW CAR f "St* JACKSON TWINS By DICK BROOKS ARCHIE By BOB MONTANA mi BEETLE BAILEY By MORT WALKER LI'L ABNER By AL CAPP "How do moms know the I-don't-want-to-go-to- school cough from the real cough ?" Hatlo's They'll Do It Every Time  Whbh AW T�4CM�R cIVES AM ASSIGNMENT FOR THE NEXT PAV THE KIPS CRV TMAT THEVffE O/ERLQAPEP- _ OM, MO / VVE'VE fi 4 � �K9T V A 8 5 4 2 4103 4S52 4K73 4 10 965 SOUTH 4 K75 f QJ63  AKQ84 + 2 The bidding-: South West North East 14 Pas* 2 4 Pass 2 4 Pass 2 4 Pass 2 NT Pass 3 4 Pass 3 4 Pass 4 ae Pass � Opening lead-jack of spades. This hand occurred in the Jlnal round of the masters team of four championships played in Washington, D. C, in 1961. The Kantar - Miles - Root - Gabrilo-vitch team, which won the event, gained 1,470 points on this one deal against the Crawford  Rapee - Stone-Roth-Kay-Silodor ^aggregation. Marshall Miles (East; had to make a good play to defeat the slam reached by Stone-Roth on the bidding shown, Kantar led a apade and Roth wort the jack in dummy and returned the ten of hearts. Miles played low and Kantar won the $ HANDS trick with the king. Kantar returned a spade, which Miles ruffed, and South went down one. Miles' duck of the ten of hearts was both courageous and effective. Had he taken the ten with the ace, Roth undoubtedly would have made the hand after ruffing two hearts in dummy. The slam was also bid at the other table, Here Gabrilovitch became declarer at six diamonds on a different sequence of bids and received a low heart lead. Gabrilovitch had used Blackwood at one point in the auction, and East had doubled the Ave heart response. Gabrilovitch then bid six diamonds over the double. The heart lead simplified the Play greatly, and declarer had no trouble making twelve tricks for a score of 1,370 points, The slam was actually below par on tha combined North-South cards, though it was far from being a terrible contract. It was the kind of hand where any slight variation in the bidding or play could-and in this case did-result in a catastrophe. Probably East should not have doubled Ave hearts at the second table, because the double instructed West to lead a heart and East could not possibly be sure that a heart lead was best for the defense. East should have kept quiet throughout. (c 1966, King Features Syndicate, Inc.) CROSSWORD PUZZLE cript (abhr.) 14Vapid 17-Re(reta 20-Faca of watch 23-Bona 24-Conjunction 25-Falsifier 27-Small children 30tet fall 32-Fondlea 35-Quietcent 37-Partner 38-Pertainin( to cheeki 39-Piecet of dinnerware gran Rinnan rann no HQCiaig aano UfMOafi iaTJQQLJfJM ?SB anraaa ana iSmgaa(iH anaa, 4l-Entranca 43-Maiican dish 44-Tautonic deity 46-Latin conjunction 48-Placa in line SI-Sewing case 53-Wlfe ef Oerilnt S7�ea eagle SS-6anaral Manager (abbr.) 0-Babylonian god C2-Symbol for tantalum 64-Eiiet THE LITTLE WOMAN i Kint F.ilur.tl^l^u, Inc., iVlf^irff iiiC� HwrvtJ. "Now if only I can convince him that men make thi best housekeepers too!" rJunior Editors Quii on- ATMOSPHERE 1 W�dw**�Uy D��r.l5; 1965" j THE S|��BST I MOAAEMT IM SPACE. QUESTION; Since there is no air in outer space, how can the atmosphere be hotpr-cold? a   ANSWERi Resides answering, we decided to illustrate the moment of man's greatest adventure in space, when Frank Borman and James Lovcll in the Gemini 7 spacecraft (left) manoevered their ship close to the Gemini 6 spacecraft (right) which had Walter Schirra and Thomas Stafford aboard. It was a triumph for America In space. If, as our questioner rightly says, there is no air In space, there can be no atmosphere there either, for air is atmosphere. The sun's rays can travel through space, but they do not heat it up, because there Is nothing in space itself to get heated; it is a vacuum.. When there is something there, however, such as a planet or moon, the sun's rays will heal it very much. On the moon; sunlight would boil your blood unless you were protected. In the shadow of .a big rock, you would freeze. This is because there is no atmosphere around the moon. Our atmosphere around the e.-\rth protects us by absorbing , sonic of the heat by day and preventing the warmth from radiating out at night, If we journey outside our atmosphere, we must carry some kind of heating apparatus with us, such as the Gemini capsule* had on their historic rendesvous flight. a  a FOR YOU TO DO: This picture and article will help you to re> member some of the facts about the rendezvous flight. Clip them out and put them in a scrap book. 221 (The Fifth Grade of the Houndtree School, Springfield, Mc, wins this week's grand prize of a 15-volume set of Campion's Pictured Kncyclopedla for this question. Mail yours on a postcard to Junior feditors in care of this newspaper.) WISHING WELUf^. Registered U. S. Patent Office. 4 A -?t- 8 G 5 A 3 Y 7 Y 6 A 2 M 8 K 2 A 3 O 7 O 6 Ij 4 s / U 4 T 2 N 5 L 3 U 6 L 8 M o Y 8 L 7 R 5 I 3 R 4 E a F 7 N 4 P 3 E 2 L 8 r 6 E 7 E 8 K 2" o 6 N 4 Y 5 A 7 W 3 C 5 K 4 O 6 D 1 s 2 V S E 3 H 5 o 4 U 7 � u �" T 7 N 5 F 2 E 6 N 4 Li 6 & 7 S 3 H 4 O 5 P 2 G 6 I 3 E 5 R 8 E 7 H 8 W N 3 B 2 I 4 V � I a j 3 E 2 F T I 7 N S D A S 6 O 2 T 7 E 4 E 5 E 6 ' Y 2_ s 3 T 7 S 1' a HERE la a pleasant little game that will give you a message) every day. It is a numerical- puzzle designed to spell eut your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the number of letters is � or more, aubtract 4. If the number is lata than 6, add 3. The result is your key number. Start at tha upper left-hand corner ef tha rectangle and check every ant of your key numbers, left to right. Then read the message the letters under the checked figures give you. 2.-21 C !�*. �r WiUlira J, MUltr. Dlatrttmtto, toy King mtum Syndicate, lae, ;

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